Waiting For You - King Midas Sound
Waiting For You Image
Metascore
81

Universal acclaim - based on 7 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 5 Ratings

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  • Summary: The project consisting of The Bug, Roger Robinson and Hitomi releases its first album together.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. 90
    The album overall shines with Martin’s production, with chills provided by filters, reverberation and the sense of shaken souls crying out each track in the album.
  2. Over half of the album's songs are filled with Robinson's bittersweet longing, brilliantly paired with some of Martin's most detailed, creative, and accessible production work.
  3. 80
    Waiting For You echoes something of The Bug's brooding, echo-drenched pressure, but where London Zoo felt dense, the likes of "Meltdown" have a beautifully spectral, washed-out quality, Robinson's sweet, soulful vocals weaving through the night in search of salvation. [Jan 2010, p. 118]
  4. Every strength this record holds draws off the symbiotic relationship between Martin's beats and Robinson's voice, which adapt to each other in a way that the last two people in a barren environment might.
  5. Waiting For You is hardly the kind of record that grabs and demands your undivided attention. Instead it offers gems buried deep amongst its cityscape’s gently fluorescing streetlamps and slow-moving traffic, crafting a distinctive, defiantly twenty-first century urban soul music that, given due care and attention, leaves an afterglow simmering long after the CD spins to a halt.
  6. Limitations can be freeing, but King Midas seems to tip-toe around a great deal of Martin’s artistic inspiration. The album successfully shows off an under-heralded side of his work, but it’s a shame that the sonic violence was deliberately repressed, rather than skillfully incorporated.
  7. 60
    Attention wanders as the album slips into a lazy mid-pace skunk groove and Robinson falls back on 'one love' lyrics, but when the duo are joined, on three tracks, by the spider-baby vocals of Kiki Hitomi the effect is unnerving, like modern urban folk tales whispered by a disembodied duo of night bus wraiths. [Jan 2010, p. 96]
Score distribution:
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