Welcome Oblivion - How to Destroy Angels
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 18
  2. Negative: 0 out of 18
  1. Apr 5, 2013
    100
    Welcome Oblivion confirms that the music world needs a band like How To Destroy Angels, too. [2 Mar 2013, p.50]
  2. Mar 14, 2013
    88
    Welcome Oblivion tracks like techno-folk haunter "Ice Age" and the doom-pop jaunt "How Long?" make uncredited cameo appearances in your nightmares until you go insane and eat your own hands.
  3. Apr 3, 2013
    80
    Even though it falls apart towards the end and could stand to cut a few songs, Welcome oblivion is a powerful record, both musically and thematically.
  4. 80
    Only the overlong ‘Ice Age’ disappoints on a solid, often stunning record.
  5. 80
    Confident, unselfconsciously weird and always engaging, Welcome Oblivion is a strange world that will draw you back again and again. [Mar 2013, p.88]
  6. Mar 4, 2013
    80
    Welcome Oblivion is not an album that comes on forcefully, and by many measures, it's the most measured record of Reznor's career, yet it's also his most melodic, showing that this former angry young man has a design to grow old gracefully.
  7. Mar 5, 2013
    75
    Reznor still manages to extract melody and an occasional hook from all the noise—a trait that goes all the way back to Nine Inch Nails’ first album.
  8. Mar 18, 2013
    70
    There’s a distinct band lurking here and there, although it may never escape Nine Inch Nails’ shadow.
  9. Mar 5, 2013
    70
    The ace in the hole should be Maandig, so foreign is a female voice in the macho world of NIN's industrial muscle. But her vocals are too often drowned out, often intentionally, by the music.
  10. Mar 22, 2013
    65
    Reznor's undeniably present, but Maandig provides a strong focal point. [Mar-Apr 2013, p.92]
  11. 63
    Unlike Nine Inch Nails' big radio hits, the majority of the songs here don't brandish catchy hooks or compact slogans designed to grab you in passing. They start out quiet and often stay that way, forcing you to lean in and immerse yourself.
  12. Mar 6, 2013
    62
    At its best, Welcome Oblivion is undecided and unfocused, with moments of intrigue scattered through songs that wander on an album that rambles. At its worst, Welcome Oblivion is passé and redundant, suggesting recent successes by Salem, Burial, Laurel Halo, Purity Ring, Gold Panda, and a litany of others without improving upon them.
  13. Apr 2, 2013
    60
    Welcome Oblivion might have worked with some edits, but ultimately fails as an LP.
  14. Mar 7, 2013
    60
    The aspirations here are lofty, as always, if less reflective than your average NIN lament; the songs swell, bobble, and even leak from the seams under the pressure.
  15. 60
    In the end, Welcome oblivion is really just three stitched-together pieces used to create a living, breathing, albeit disjointed creature.
  16. Mar 14, 2013
    50
    Whether you look at this as Reznor, Ross and Maandig’s “first” album or not, Welcome Oblivion depicts How to Destroy Angels as a little adrift, mixing road-weary maturity with rookie mistakes.
  17. Mar 5, 2013
    50
    Much of Welcome to Oblivion feels like a 65-minute placeholder akin to a remix album rather than a major new direction for Reznor to pursue.
  18. Mar 4, 2013
    40
    It’s a nice, low-key respite from NIN’s angry catharsis, but 65 mid-tempo minutes with little variation (the sparse acoustics of How Long? aside) make it a slog.
User Score
7.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 37 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 13
  2. Negative: 2 out of 13
  1. Mar 7, 2013
    3
    While I do appreciate that this album contains good and well made music, it is not something I can sit down and enjoy over and over again. IWhile I do appreciate that this album contains good and well made music, it is not something I can sit down and enjoy over and over again. I hate to say it, but it is boring. I get the gist of it after the first couple of songs; it's all so similar. Everyone in this band is so much more talented than what is shown here, and it's a bummer that this turned out so basic. Full Review »
  2. Mar 5, 2013
    4
    Basically Trent's soundtrack work. Terrible head shaking lyrics with a disney cruise vocalist. Won't excite 99% of NIN fans, won't gain anyBasically Trent's soundtrack work. Terrible head shaking lyrics with a disney cruise vocalist. Won't excite 99% of NIN fans, won't gain any new fans. We get it, it's "not" NIN, but sounds exactly like what you've been doing for the past 6 years with vapid NIN-lite lyrics from a very cold and boring vocalist. If if weren't for the vocals and lyrics it would could be a decent instrumental album. Full Review »
  3. Mar 6, 2013
    9
    I get people not being able to let go of preconceived notions of what Trent should be sounding like based on their usually pretty shallowI get people not being able to let go of preconceived notions of what Trent should be sounding like based on their usually pretty shallow knowledge of the Nine Inch Nails catalogue. That's understandable. It's dumb, but understandable. But don't let that stop y'all from seeing that this is a solid album by a band that themselves live in the shadow of NIN, probably quite consciously. They've put together an album that ranges from ethereal to jarring sometimes within the same track while maintaining a sense of cohesion. Full Review »