Arizona Republic's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 983 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Descendants
Lowest review score: 10 The Legend of Hercules
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 983
983 movie reviews
  1. Blackfish is a disturbing movie, one that will make you rethink parks like SeaWorld and their value.
  2. Make no mistake, Daniels is gunning for awards here; the movie has that sheen, that Big Important Feel. But the performances keep it grounded. Let someone else decide winners and losers. Just enjoy “The Butler” for the sometimes-moving experience it is.
  3. The world Bell creates in In a World ... is so agreeable and inviting you’ll enjoy the visit.
  4. A mix of comedy, science fiction, nostalgia, adolescent wish-fulfillment and beer, beer, beer, its parts shouldn’t fit together as neatly as they do. But somehow Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg have again managed to make a movie that is knowing, touching and hilarious.
  5. Although at times maybe not enough happens, it’s still a satisfying homage to a golden age of American film and an original achievement in its own right.
  6. These characters are more than willing to risk their lives to further advances in science. That’s a passion and dedication that fuels Europa Report, and Cordero makes the most of it.
  7. The directors (Lapeyre also wrote the film) have gathered a terrific bunch of young actors for the film, which plays at times like a “Lord of the Flies” knockoff but also has something original to say.
  8. What makes Drinking Buddies so compelling is that feeling that these are real people, behaving in real ways.
  9. The Patience Stone largely functions as a one-woman play, with Farahani’s character soliloquizing over her husband’s body.
  10. Mulloy’s only other directing credit is for the documentary short “This Morning.” She brings a documentarian’s objective eye to Una Noche, yet the actors — non-professionals — convey exactly the emotions she is looking for.
  11. A delightful look at the public career and mostly private life of the ultimate professional amateur.
  12. Oh, and the title? It could be an apt description for almost any character in the movie at one time or another. The satisfaction is in finding out who, if anyone, will be set free.
  13. A sharp turn on the romantic comedy, a movie about flawed people doing flawed things, often in funny fashion.
  14. Picks up where the first film left off, literally, and offers at least as many laughs (if not more for adults), retaining the goofy attitude. Cameron and Pearn throw a lot at the wall, just like their predecessors, and most of it sticks.
  15. Moors is neither showy nor exploitative in his telling of the story. He just lays out the details, making “Blue Caprice” not just a story of horror, but of tragedy.
  16. An engaging film that’s head and shoulders above the average talking-head parade.
  17. Captain Phillips is a voyage well-worth taking.
  18. The love the two have for each other, particularly she for him, is obvious and moving. So, too, is not just the desire to create, but the need to.
  19. It’s well-staged, well-acted, all the right people die in the end. It comes down to, well, Romeo and Juliet, really, and Douglas Booth and Hailee Steinfeld prove capable in the title roles.
  20. It’s a powerfully sensual movie, gorgeously lensed colors and textures conveying its characters emotional states while thoughtfully exploring the range of human sexuality through Adenike’s experience.
  21. With its lush look, uniformly excellent acting, slow cadences and unhurried unspooling, We Are What We Are rewards your patience without skimping on the goods.
  22. The movie is more a collection of cool people telling great stories than it is a structured documentary (despite Camalier’s attempts in that direction). But in this case, that’s enough.
  23. Checking in at nearly three hours and so full of passions and appetites, it’s impossible for it not to exhaust you.
  24. One reason the movie works so well: Writer-director Malcolm D. Lee returns from the original, so the characters feel true to the first film. Secondly, most of the cast is back, and they have the kind of comfortable chemistry you can’t fake. It’s easy to believe these people have a history together.
  25. Catching Fire is a great leap forward for the franchise. Seeing as it’s all about hope and what it represents, here’s hoping the next two are just as good, if not better.
  26. To call Armstrong’s story a tragedy is probably an overblown notion. But it does involve sadness, not just with its depiction of a fallen idol, but with the necessary acknowledgment that some of our own hopes and dreams fell alongside him.
  27. Nebraska is as cold and unforgiving as its setting, yet just as stunning.
  28. Philomena could have been a sappy movie, but it’s not. Instead, with such assured performances, it’s proof that sometimes a laugh makes swallowing a big dose of outrage a little easier.
  29. Gondry’s illustrations are as fascinating as the chats. Sometimes they look like markers on a napkin. Other times they are reminiscent of something made on the old Lite-Brite toy. They’re always delightful.
  30. It’s a Fellini-esque carnival of humanity on display, a more debauched phantasmagoria reminiscent of “La Dolce Vita.” But “La Dolce Vita” created the paparazzi; The Great Beauty takes place in a world where the paparazzi have existed for decades.

Top Trailers