Armchair DJ's Scores

  • Music
For 49 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 90 Kittenz And Thee Glitz
Lowest review score: 20 The Impossible Thrill
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 36 out of 49
  2. Negative: 2 out of 49
49 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each song drifts in and out of focus like snatches of street noise on a half-awake Sunday morning - no need to get up, just lie there and listen quietly.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The most consistently lovely album of his career.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's easy to dismiss crossover hits as a dumbed-down version of an underground sound. But damn it, this is a phenomenal album.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This back-to-basics approach gives dynamic focus to Harvey's lyrics, which tantalize with their taut, elliptical precision.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A masterful bricolage that revisits the crossroads of early-'80s clubland without ever settling for cheap pastiche.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The secret to Garnier's accessibility lies in his ability to locate fresh specific sounds and organize them sparsely atop the existing framework of electronic dance music.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A polished, classy album whose retrained elegance and melancholy resonance more than compensate for its lack of rhythmic and instrumental restlessness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This sort of thing may be n steps removed from the dancefloor, but it's also thrillingly physical, even while it tantalizes the mind.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unabashedly beautiful tunes like "I Don't Believe in the Sun" and "Come Back from San Francisco" provide provide ample payoff for the arduous process of listening to the collection in total.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A perfect overview for new initiates and packs plenty of surprises for hardcore fans.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The group's most consistently rewarding album since 1993's "Very."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "So ..." is one of the most innovative albums of the year, stretching the gamut of every musical genre that melts in your head, not in your mouth.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining state-of-the-art sonic trickery with inventive rhythms, gorgeous melodies and - most importantly - solid structures, these 19 tracks represent Handley and Turner's most satisfying collection to date.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Academics and readers of The Wire may sniff that "Idiology" marks a step backward for this duo, but for my money this is the best thing they've done since 19997's "Autoditacker."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If refining one's vision rather than foraging for new sounds is the mark of emerging artistic maturity, then it appears that techno's jester genius has finally decided to grown up.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From start to finish, "Midnite Vultures" is a total party romp of an album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those expecting another helping of stand-up comedy and skewed dancefloor firepower clearly won't find what they're looking for on "Whatever," but the LP certainly hangs together better than any previous Green Velvet CD.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The first album from The Sixths was a dirge-like affair, but the new one's delightful.... The maturity of Merritt's songwriting lends emphasis to the singers' voices and interpretive powers; more often than not, they avail themselves capably.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beaucoup Fish isn't a huge step forward for Underworld, but it is a refinement of their sound.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    First Album is proof that embracing a cliche with style can be just as powerful as running away from it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The year's most enjoyable piece of agit-pop.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Saint Etienne retain their stature as a great, if unsung, singles band who have a way with a killer b.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album as life-affirming as its predecessor was bleak.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Now if only the duo could deliver an LP that's consistently rather than merely frequently brilliant, we could stop fast-forwarding through the second-string tracks and soggy ballads that clutter up side B.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Geogaddi" improves on "Music Has the Right to Children" by taking the Boards of Canada sound into darker, more disturbing and fragmented directions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not since Bomb the Bass's "Clear" has a British production team re-interpreted aging African American tropes so persuasively.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Detroit techno artists Juan Atkins and Carl Craig rub shoulders with back-to-basics rappers The Roots and electro-folkie Beth Orton (on the Watt-produced "Stars All Seem to Weep"), creating a distinctive chillout vibe out of disparate genres.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    "Mosaic Thump" still suffers many of the weaknesses of its genre. Like most rap LPs it's overlong and features too many guest stars.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Occasionally, as on the gurgling electro-pop of "Short Circuit," the album actually manages to disappoint. But more often it provides the kind of intelligently produced yet universally likeable floor-fillers that keep even devoted hipsters from killing themselves when their relatives drag them to suburban dance clubs.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This disc may lack its predecessor's immediacy, but rarely has sophomore slump sounded like such success.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    That The Aluminum Group is an acquired taste becomes more true with every album, but each outing provides at least a few tracks like these ("Satellite", "Tom of Finland") that truly captivate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The very qualities that annoyed me about it at first - the "proper" musicality, the lack of rough edges - are what draws me to it now.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    These 13 dusky ditties almost always enchant.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite initial misgivings, "The Contino Sessions" has a hypnotic effect that does shine through and is one album that improves upon repeat listens. While not perfect ... "The Contino Sessions" is a dark, mysterious album that will leave you with more questions than answers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    "Ghost" marks the welcome debut of a more body-oriented brand of user-friendly experimentation - crisp and cool, yet dionysian at the same time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The overlong LP... reveals an artist who could use some discipline, but there's enough melody, wit and funk hidden among these 14 tracks to brighten any R&B fan's Christmas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The lushness of 1992's "Love Deluxe" has given way to an understatement so pronounced it's almost jarring; this LP sounds like it was recorded in zero gravity.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The entire LP takes on a sort of plodding sameness even as the overall sonics soar.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    "Central Reservation" is a decidedly grown-up pleasure and Orton is an artist who succeeds splendidly on her own modest terms.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's as if there's an optimal number of musical ideas per song, and the album falls apart when the number spikes too high - or dips too low.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    New treats for established fans and a quick overview for the newly curious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Much of the music's electronic undertow has receded, leaving Laetitia Sadier and Mary Hansen's airy melodies and counter-melodies stranded in gassy lounge-pop compositions that sound merely retro instead of retro-futuristic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What once sounded like a compelling dance-pop concept now seems genial, verging on retro.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Oh, there are moments of pure wonder, to be sure, but they're sandwiched between tracks that either retread old ideas or execute less impressive new ones.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    When you string them all together and play them to the bleachers, "Cups" and "Push Upstairs" and "Shudder/King of Snake" sound remarkably interchangeable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the melodic acumen Merritt displayed on last year's Magnetic Fields opus, "69 Love Songs," is largely AWOL on "I'm Lonely and I Love It."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In the year between its European and its and U.S. releases, "Movement" lost four tracks and gained four others, but these dubious "improvements" turned the disc from a decent dance-pop LP to a blatant, though scattered, crossover bid.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The LP comes off like a gently melodious but ultimately odorless fart. That is to say, it's practically invisible and it's easy to forget about once the moment has, ahem, passed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    An LP full of nothing but compromises and dried-up creativity.