Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,509 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Yellow & Green
Lowest review score: 20 Rockferry
Score distribution:
1,509 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Not since the maniac thrash of 1986's genre-eclipsing Reign in Blood have these SoCal wastrels managed music that sounds so frighteningly out of control and yet wholly, idealistically pure of intent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Ben Kweller is breezy and buoyant, hallmarks of grand pop albums. And this is indeed a grand pop album.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A haunting disc that lingers long after the laser dies.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Crane Wife could be the best Robyn Hitchcock album made in several years; the lyrical marriage of whimsy and death bear the fruits of a master class led by the former Soft Boy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    How a band from such an incestuous scene produced an album with such keen pop instincts that nonetheless stops well short of ripping anyone, local or national, off continues to boggle the mind.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A near-perfect sonic snapshot of London under Blair's blowback blitz.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    If Richard Swift isn't on your radar yet, time to adjust the antenna.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    We Were Dead sounds like Modest Mouse, only better.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Thirty-six minutes of a detailed, agonizing shot in the arm, a veritable buffet of musical stylings, each song bettering the one before, from a band that just as easily could've released a new version of "Gimme Fiction."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Shinsian popsters rejoice. Here's another dreamsicle caked with sugar sugar.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Chicagoan West innovatively samples Elton John ('Good Morning'), imports Coldplay's Chris Martin for the 'Homecoming' hook, and plays to Young Jeezy's ad-libbing ability on 'Can't Tell Me Nothing.' Lyrically, West sticks to his "I'm so self-conscious" tip, but unlike 50, he knows his rhyme schemes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Oakland quartet, now on Jack Johnson's Brushfire imprint, has a greater sense of urgency, sharper edges, and a more mature sound overall.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    It's a slow-motion ballet immortalized on album.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    "No revelations in the water, no tears into the booze," Bridwell imparts in closer 'Window Blues,' but Band of Horses keeps demonstrating both.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    In the Vines is a spare, unhurried blend of raw instrumentation and experimental electronic noisemaking serving as a chronicle of crippling depression and death's imminent domain.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Make no mistake, The Cool's stuffy and its plot a bitch to decipher (only four joints detail the story), but every 16-bar verse is stuffed, even the glitzy Snoop collab, "Hi-Definition," with zingers garnishing crates of encrypted metrical compositions that demand critical analysis from student groups of no more than four, no less than two to a table.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    As if on cue amid the recent critical hemming and hawing over indie rock's cultural appropriations drops Vampire Weekend's official debut with enough justified buzz to render the entire debate moot.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A huge cast of supporting players like Ben Gibbard, John Roderick, Sean Nelson, and Juliana Hatfield add yet more depth to what might be Nada Surf's best work yet.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    For Emma is a paradigm of uninhibited closure, a gentle touch on a sad day.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Badu's brave New Amerykah is a liberated land, a wild embrace of experimentation, and a gleeful if occasionally paranoid freak-fest.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Jangling Jack's back.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Intense doesn't begin to describe Midnight Boom, but loop the Russian roulette sequence from "The Deer Hunter," splice in some grainy security-cam voyeur-porn, pop it in the Videodrome VCR, and you'll at least get the picture.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Devotchka's captured the sound of a new world order.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Highlight and opener 'First Sight' consciously cops Postal Service pulse, but Elliott's emotion lies in the shading dodge that dances ever on the periphery of his poeticism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    From the opening preface, "The Sundering," it's apparent that Gods transcends the Sabbath worship of its contemporaries, a clearer sense of control and pacing underscoring the biblical tales of wrath and retribution.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    In such stories, McMurtry locates again and again an element of humanity that saves his angriest screeds from easy pigeonholing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    II Trill but never too trill, the second solo swagger from UGKer Bun B spins triumphant, Houston hip-hop ripped both in celebration of properly executed gangster prophecies and passed partner-in-slang Pimp C.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Here's a couple that turns in a strong fifth LP. Kori Gardner (keys, vox) and Jason Hammel (drums, vox) keep their cheery, indie rock, boy-girl harmonies intact while simultaneously exorcising any relationship-related demons that may lurk in their Connecticut home.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Where Rufus' work is fabulously bedazzled, Martha's remains earth-hued and loamy--rich, deep, complex--making Married well worth the wait.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A number of contemporary indie bands attempts to strip-mine mountain ballads in the service of indie pop, but none has melded the impulses as effortlessly and captivatingly as Fleet Foxes manage on "Blue Ridge Mountains" and "Oliver James." Sublime.