Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,577 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Earth Is Not A Cold Dead Place
Lowest review score: 20 Visitations
Score distribution:
1,577 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Abandoning "another album with a rhythmic premise" according to So Beautiful's deluxe edition DVD, Paul Simon nevertheless injects echoes of Graceland and The Rhythm of the Saints in "Dazzling Blue" and "Love Is Eternal Sacred Light," respectively, feeding their author's master class mixtape of varied musical mattes (the Moby-like spiritual sampling on "Getting Ready for Christmas Day") like There Goes Rhymin' Simon and Still Crazy After All These Years.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Garbus is a "new kinda woman," declares closing track, "Killa," and it's about damn time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Follow-up Take Care, Take Care, Take Care largely forgoes the wide-screen expanse of the band's Friday Night Lights film soundtrack (2004) if favor of a more insular experience, casting intrigue in the minute details.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With Stone Rollin', California's vintage soul man is doubling down on the classic R&B while drawing from a deeper well and muddying up the water. Hitsville is still part of the formula, but so now are Howlin' Wolf and Sly Stone.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    While hit single and opener "Helena Beat" suggests that Foster the People has mastered the sunny-but-bitter concoction, "Waste" and "I Would Do Anything for You" provide a sweet balance on the palate.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With support from Geffen Records waning, Young retaliated with a crack country outfit in the International Harvesters and dug his boots into the outlaw sound with conviction.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A 25th anniversary minibox stuffs poster and postcards in with a mother lode second disc of 19 "Athens Demos," from punky ("Bad Day") to finished ("All the Right Friends").
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    1993's Icky Mettle thumps Warp's warpath between lo-fi sad sackery ("You and Me") and shitstorm post-post punk ("Sick File"). The Archers of Loaf vs. The Greatest of All Time EP ignites a bonus disc as anthemic as 1977 Clash ("Bathroom").
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Tassili's more acoustic than previous efforts but entirely transfixing, filled with haunted pleas about solitude ("Asuf D Alwa"), faith ("Ya Messinagh"), and drought ("Takest Tamidaret").
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    FSHG continues this wheelhouse effect, drifting from Smile session bounce on opener "Honey Bunny" into the heavy-psych wind tunnel of "Die" and sprawling anchor "Vomit."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Singing sometimes borders on yelling, but the promised heights reach their summit.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Metals is darker, more contemplative, heavier, a heady, atomic blend of folk-pop and emotional menace.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Though Waits holds a reserved seat in the small club of artists who don't put out bad albums, the whiff of wild youth hangs around Bad as Me as if it was recorded in back alleys, behind churches, and in bars after hours.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This John Dwyer-led, San Francisco collective's jagged psych-punk has always been ear catching, but this ups the ante.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With the CD mix the same as the 1996 remaster, plus a poster, 7-inch single, replicas of Townshend's handwritten notes and drawings, a DVD of 5.1 mixes, and a hardback book packed with photos and creative musings, this Director's Cut earns its indulgence.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Roots are the best hip-hop band today and ever, no questions asked, and Undun is Black Thought's greatest mark.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    From cow-punk ("Killed a Chicken Last Night") and DIY metal ("Dontcha Lie to Me Baby") to gritty classic rock ("Wind up Blind"), Biram proves the ultimate outlaw.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Lion's Roar lacks gravitas, but that will come with time and heartbreak. The soul, candor, and the way they sing "darling," that's the hard stuff, and it's scarcely sounded more gorgeous.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This is dirty, dusty, disintegrated bay-music at its best.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Sequenced hopscotch-style between the two principle composers, Old Mad Joy barely drops a beat ("You Must Not Know").
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Heartless Bastards return not as they started, but as an undeniable and tightly controlled force of nature.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Its debut gets a lot of traction out of being crisp and clean.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    New Multitudes is a resilient tribute to Woody Guthrie based on the folk pioneer's unpublished lyrics.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    May be his best yet.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Wrecking Ball spins Springsteen's most focused work since 2002's The Rising and most defiant and hooky since 1984's Born in the U.S.A.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The band's third album, Milk Famous, returns to the twitchy dance-rock that made this Brooklyn group such an unstoppable opening act, folding in dashes of Talking Heads' jitter-pop and some blackened post-punk tautness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    By going back to adolescence, Fite's made his most mature album.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With material like this, he may even find a way to add a chapter to the Great American Songbook.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Broken never sounded so divine.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    It's Ray Wylie Hubbard at his best, candid, shrugging, unapologetic, and dispensing rock & roll philosophy in words that matter.