Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 To Pimp A Butterfly
Lowest review score: 20 Luminous
Score distribution:
1,611 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The combination of Roth's deft touch, Hunter's gritty vocals, and the band's skilled musicianship makes Minute by Minute one of the best of the year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    He's the finest true soul voice of his generation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Aural adventurers, the mothership has landed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Ready to Die finds the quintet on Fat Possum, making them indie artists for the first time, and they give their new label the best produced, loudest, and slickest--without sacrificing any primal grit and drive--Stooges disc yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Sing to the Moon is a bold and beautiful debut: airy and dense, soul and jazz, dark and light. Head in the clouds, toes in the dirt.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    On the London quartet's debut Silence Yourself, the group whips up a storm of aggressive rhythms, strident vocalizing, and six-string sheen as if the succeeding pop trends never happened and Gang of Four and Siouxsie & the Banshees rule the charts.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    RAM has the immediate appeal of disco, but never overstuffs with candied hooks, even when we want it to.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The National reveled in self-effacing jokes between the heaviness of their songs, and Trouble finally finds that balance on disc.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Bandleaders Phil Cope and Laura Pleasants show off five LPs worth of development, coming into their own on "Unspoken," "Quicksand," and "Grounded," all lessons in following the muse down a path of riff-ripened enlightenment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Like Clockwork: great for rock & roll, great for culture, great for the world.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Sure, they're not very hip, but Portugal the Man are anything but slouches, and Evil Friends is proof that some bands get big for being good, nothing else.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    He's become a master craftsman on the order of Guy Clark and John Prine.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The freshest, most exhilarating rap album of 2013.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This is the Octopus Project you've witnessed a million times, the one you've been waiting to show up on your speakers.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Pushin' Against a Stone showcases a stunning and unique new voice.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Destruction Unit appreciates chaos, as their guerrilla bridge show a few SXSWs ago demonstrated, but Deep Trip proves they know how to play their instruments even if ducking behind a wall of squall.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    All the studio LPs are augmented with bonus material, while three discs compiled exclusively for this box are where the treasure resides.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Combined with illuminating outtakes and demos from less-troubled follow-up New Morning, they make Another Self Portrait a far more rewarding listen than its predecessor.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A pair of trad-style instrumentals, "Snake Chapman's Tune" and "Pacific Slope," underlines Fulks' sublime stylistic mastery.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Challenging, enigmatic, and melodic don't always go together, but coupled with Case's sleek vocals, they make The Worse Things Get ... a marvel.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Made In California's hefty price tag won't endear it to serious fans, but it's the first release to encompass the Beach Boys' entire inspiring, frustrating, contradiction-laden tale.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Scottish trio aren't trying to subvert anything on debut long-player The Bones of What You Believe, churning out hard-driving and utterly undeniable electro-pop, and the hooks arrive absolutely relentless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With every release he proves his idiosyncrasy. Nobody else in the world knows how to make an Oneohtrix Point Never album.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Build Me Up From Bones calls on the same whimsical picking that earned her an early Grammy nomination for Best Country Instrumental Performance, while diversifying to great effect.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Gentle outlaw Cass McCombs luxuriates in sunlit California landscapes, weaving offbeat tales of carousing and yearning on Big Wheel and Others.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Eccentric, eclectic, and brilliant.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    San Diego triangle Isaiah Mitchell, Mike Eginton, and Rocket From the Crypt propulsionist Mario Rubalcaba hurtle third studio LP and first since 2007 into the void atop a gloriously earthen pachyderm crunch on four tracks.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Rosanne Cash caps a trilogy of reflection with poise and insight, a complex cultural legacy moved distinctly forward.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Indian throws a temper tantrum on From All Purity that goes beyond petulance and into an appropriately pure state of sanity-stomping anguish, purging the demons with sulfuric acid and a nail-studded baseball bat.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    There's sex, drugs, crab cakes, and people you've never met and never will, including James Gandolfini and the children of Newtown, Conn., but their presence devastates nonetheless.