Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,802 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Ramones [40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 Luminous
Score distribution:
1802 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Like Arcade Fire's Funeral and The Suburbs, there's a thrashing catharsis in childhood emotions, but Sheff balances raw moments with a more mature filter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Free of the confines of the band that made her famous, Friedberger flourishes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Tony! Toni! Toné! has done it again!
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    [151A] offers a carpe-diem blend of silliness and surrealism, pathos and ethereal melodies layered like a quirky aural mille-feuille.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    It's almost unimaginable, but they continue to render sounds that swirl and dissolve into something deceptively and gloriously American.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    After the acerbic, introspective detour of Mutations, Mr. Hansen has decided it's time to get his freak on.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    You're inclined to not like the too-self-aware man of I Love You, Honeybear, rejecting his moodiness because you can't stand another white man taking himself so fucking seriously. Then again, making fun of him is just falling into his trap.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    His fifth LP ties it all together with ethereal jazz-soul in summer colors, bolstered by the nimble swing provided by members of Bob Dylan's band and New Orleans horns orchestrated again by Tin Hat Trio's Rob Burger.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    With seventh LP There Is No Enemy, leader Doug Martsch fully embraces Young's mid-1970s songwriter mold--the songs are a bit slower, with a reflective urgency and pop polish that garners strength in every repeat listen – and on that ground alone the album succeeds.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The funky "Eastside," the snap and bop of "Green Light," and the honeyed coo of "Sweet Little Messages" all stand out on an effort that gets extra points for trying something different and succeeding beyond anybody's dreams.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Throughout, there's a sense that the band lives to let it all hang out--beg, scream, and shout.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Delbert McClinton tears up the blues circuit, but the easy saturation of Prick of the Litter serves up its own satisfaction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Whereas 2004's epic completion of "Smile" allowed the Beach Boy to rewrite (and right) history, his follow-up plays like the ultimate product of that self-examination.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    A most welcome comeback.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    As always, the contrast between Adam Franklin's smooth pipes and his and Jimmy Hartridge's strident six-strings provides the sonic setting, enabling Swervedriver to put the brawn back in beauty.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    In a certain light, bandleader Grey comes across as Springsteen from the Florida swamps – in love with his roots, yet literate enough to make his message a universal one.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    'Bodysnatchers' exhibits the electioneering energy of The Bends with a monstrous riff that explodes into a spiral galaxy of guitar, but the remainder of the album flows like an extended Soma holiday.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    A noisy fun house bouncing around Nirvana, the Replacements, and Guided by Voices, the Whigs' sophomore slam is just as likely to push you up against a wall as whisper pillow talk.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    In Time is the best kind of band reunion, honoring and expanding the Mavericks' legacy rather than exploiting it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    There are a few 10-second temper tantrums--chief among them the heartfelt "Your Kid's an Asshole"--but Iron Reagan's genius remains injecting angel dust into songs you'll sing along to even after they whip your ass.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    It's a kick in the teeth from start to finish.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Chock-full of crowd-pleasers plus a mystifying tale of Townes Van Zandt's "If I Needed You," Clark and his band once again weave a beguiling spell.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Titling your major label bow Marry Me builds certain expectations. Thankfully, everywhere on her full-length debut, Annie Clark makes the title's request impossible.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Like its predecessor, Give is edgy, irreverent, and yes, fun.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    No bad news here, just more headline-making from an innovative, ever-maturing group of musicians.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The maniacal conviction with which the Hives tear nonsensical pop songs to shreds on Tyrannosaurus is no shuck 'n' jive.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    These love songs aren't the kind that make you giddy, but Johnston's ability to articulate the naked foibles of human emotion and Linkous' somnambulant soundscapes elevate Fear Yourself beyond easy platitudes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Big K.R.I.T.'s the metalloid conglomeration of the Dirty South ideal, a fiery rapper who recognizes the appeal for dousing an 8Ball & MJG collaboration with a hot vat of molasses.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Jeffery redefines what trap could be going forward.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The Loon is an exercise in heavy-lidded ballsiness.