BBC collective's Scores

  • Music
For 150 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Panic Prevention
Lowest review score: 40 Yours Truly, Angry Mob
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 150
150 music reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is one of those rare albums that makes you wonder how you ever got by without it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s not just the recurrent meditations on mortality that makes Ma Fleur even more heart-rendingly beautiful than 2002’s Everyday, it’s also how The Cinematic Orchestra’s new album actually feels.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Experimental yet poppy, awkward yet unforced, Panic Prevention is a minor masterpiece from a truly bar-raising new talent.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s exciting stuff, simple yet deadly effective.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though it still errs toward a languid late-60s template, Cabic’s songwriting is now crisp and effortlessly melodic.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Essential listening.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Much of Hissing Fauna… dances in the face of its depressing subject matter.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is music that hits the head, heart and hips all at once.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An album as rich as it is strange.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is not a bunch of old blokes looking to recapture their youth; rather, Grinderman sounds like a freshly hewn and rudely vigorous chunk of leftfield rock.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Excellent Italian Greyhound is vintage Shellac: stark, razorous and blackly comic, lurching into whatever time signature happens to possess drummer Tod Trainer.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    M.I.A. and co-producers, including Switch, straddle more styles than you’d find in most music collections, let alone on the same disc.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    it's great to hear Banhart playing outside of type, and the swagger and muscle occasionally at work suit him surprisingly well.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In Rainbows really does present Radiohead at their most full-blooded and confident.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    When Cease To Begin rocks out it's euphoric, but there's a mournfulness shadowing each of these insistent melodies that will have you crying even as you smile.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The songs on Comicopera rate amongst his very best--emotionally complex, politically charged but never short of beautiful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Throughout, monster riffs abound. Perhaps this monochrome-clad cartoon combo are as great as singer Howlin’ Pelle always said they were.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Upon starting Soft Bulletin--you’re instantly whisked off into the universe the Flaming Lips have created. The musical journey that ensues is nothing short of imaginary genius--simple as.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A textbook lesson in sublime but understated country soul.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Possibly their best and certainly most joyously eclectic album yet.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Filling the gaps between Prince and !!!, this is for those who spent the last two decades shaking their hips rather than banging their heads.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This mini album sometimes feels as if it’s thrown together like quickly-packed luggage.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An addictive and immersive debut album.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sensuous, subtle but emotionally overwhelming dreamscapes, whose luminous beauty makes pigeonholing nigh on impossible.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Preposterous, touching and brilliant.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This will end up flying off the shelves for sure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Together, they’re a marriage made in musical haven.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s clear that chemistry was in the air.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Short answer: it’s good.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The best thing about Garden Ruin is the way they look beyond country borders to engage with the wider world, both culturally and musically.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re after dark, bloody romance with a twist, look no further.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Warm and quirky. Pleasantly bizarre. Sophisticated and daft. Herbert at his best.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their second album continues in a similarly delicious vein, melding wonky electronics, pillow-soft soul and lyrics that manage to weave strange violence into gorgeous soul songs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Eraser’s sound lies somewhere between the roiling beat soup of Amnesiac and a poppier sensibility.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An ultra-sensuous experience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The translations offer many witty surprises.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ward’s band kick back with a looser, rockier feel than previously, yet his dusty, wistful voice still inhabits an age all of its own.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A less angular, more grown-up album - something that won’t rattle your nerves.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At 77 minutes it’s no sprint, but YLT’s mellifluous serpentines are never less than involving.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a winning combination, with the Prince’s shambolic charm still intact but lent clarity by the new additions that make this infinitely preferable to previous efforts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Meek Warrior’s seven tracks form a sprawling tapestry where every guitar pluck, clarinet wail or joyous shout seems part of some euphoric cosmic plan.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [Finn's] smart, poetic, unashamedly adult lyrics... almost guarantee this is the best arena band that’ll never play an arena.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bewildered newcomers will soon be entranced, old fans won't be disappointed.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ys
    It’s to her great credit that Newsom (literally) plucks artistic triumph from the jaws of cloying whimsy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As exciting as it is original-sounding.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This only occasionally matches the breathtaking splendour of last year's …Illinoise! but with its modest price and immodest extras only Scrooge could fail to have his heart warmed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Now every track is an intensely creative pop gem, like those brilliant pockets scattered throughout previous releases, refined and condensed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At their best, on Yankee Go Home and Five Easy Pieces, their sound becomes less indie rock than ecstatic chanting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dip
    As lush and expansive as his former work was taut and aggro - only the quality remains.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are off-centre, post-hardcore workouts and plenty of edgy but polished, pop fusion pieces, which suggest The Futureheads transplanted to 70s West Coast America.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are missteps... and the production is sometimes frustratingly muddy, but Neon Bible very nearly delivers on impossible expectations.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s dark title belies its artful balancing of psych pop’s sweetness with head-down, rock riffing and the emotional power of the blues.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overblown orchestrations, searing choruses, a demonic self-help tape pastiche and odes to Tom Cruise’s private life are tempered by sparse melodic interludes and tender songs of souls battling against grim routine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    El-P's uniquely, beautifully harsh vision remains undiluted.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sort of euphoric, sweetly intentioned indie pop that, despite occasionally making Belle & Sebastian sound like Da Lench Mob, nevertheless manages to stay the right side of cloying.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As fun and full-on as it gets right now.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Turner’s sharp narrative ear is still tuned to the revealing banalities of everyday life, the whole band admirably responsive to emotional nuance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is less cohesive than Vespertine or Medulla but the fun’s in the exuberance, the jolting between musical styles.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He’s an acquired taste, perhaps, but a distinctive and extraordinarily talented songwriter.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The influences may be antediluvian but the spirit is timeless.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While their sound might have progressed in an even more bizarre – if sadly less atmospheric – direction, it's still surprising, full of invention and totally unique.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than play catch-up, the Chems are accentuating the difference, digging deeper into melody instead of piling on the noise.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, The Sun feels like three men taking things at their own leisurely pace but without wasting a second.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If there is such a thing as music with a hairy chest, this is it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their debut has a great deal of shadowy appeal: there are lyrics about ghosts and secrets, set to drowsy washes of guitar.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a real richness here, and raw venom beneath any fey first impressions, as gentle finger-picking bursts into free-jazz fuzztone guitar blasts and bloodied lyrics.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's brilliant: Broder's twisted tales are better than ever, this time underpinned by urgent guitar riffs, off-beats and perfect pacing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Don't let the seductively pleasant drift of the tunes fool you: this is sharp, dark stuff.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even by her own unsettling standards, however, her seventh album is disturbing, a collection of smudged and spectral laments that appear to have been written before the invention of penicillin.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a folk album so rich and intricate that, in scope, it's comparable to Van Morrison's "Astral Weeks."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An ambitious, filler-free, modernist-sounding beast which laughs in the face of underachievement.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new album conjures something of Condon’s own imagination, more deftly-etched romantic fiction than dry travelogue, and is all the better for it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a bewildering jumble on first gaze, but Harte's little fingerprint-smudged slivers, so lovingly composed, are precious things, and you'll fast find yourself addicted to his sweet, glum love stories.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frank is an honest, refreshingly personal record which, though very occasionally strays into easy jazz, has Gucci bags of personality.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A fine album for autumn.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the permutations, Amiina's fragile magic can't fail to beguile.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burial has concocted a noir-ish sound that’s as powerful as it is atmospheric.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Give it a bloody good stereo and your full attention.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His vivid, scattershot rhymes are clever without being cryptic, and his techno-tinged beats never veer off into tuneless arhythmia.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is cathartic, psychically haunted fare; pleasing and troubling in equal measure.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their sophomore album is surprisingly world-weary, but brims with an almost brutal rawness and betrays the pair’s striking talent for storytelling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are few dynamic surprises here, and no serrated edges, but this disc's strength lies in its building mass of lumbering, decelerated funk, its textures gluey and thick.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This anthology of new and previously released 7” singles is inevitably somewhat dishevelled as an album, but then this extraordinary band has always worked best in bite-size.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Love Travels At Illegal Speeds is good stuff that doesn’t drive you round the bend. It doesn’t pack any surprises either.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The incessant hooklines cloy a little after repeated listens, but that’s hardly the most damning criticism of a pop band.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a step backwards for sure, but a worthwhile one.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The freewheeling garage bangers of Original Pirate Material have receded into the distance and we’re left with stabbing high-range synths... resulting in an album that’s charming and witty, but not as exhilarating as it might have been.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Five albums in, The Coup have just made their best since their debut.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Waterloo To Anywhere is more pro and muscular than former endeavours, chiming more with labelmates Razorlight’s ambitious professionalism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A complex yet controlled fourth album of astonishing beauty and perfect strangeness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not all of Dangerfield's maverick ideas work - he should steer clear of under-accompanied singing for a start - but when they do take off, Guillemots really soar.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A welcome reminder of the Brummie art-poppers’ lighter, brighter past.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The confessional micro-detail of Darnielle’s minimal indie-folk songs – and haunted whine of a voice – remains stoically unchanged.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a one-trick pony album sure, but what a trick.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Heartfelt but sometimes overly polite.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Shot through with attention to detail and the lush production typical of Dunkel’s main concern, Darkel might have its moments of archness but it knows how to shake it’s booty, too.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This may not measure up to The Hour Of Bewilderbeast, but it does boast a batch of sweet and deceptively unfussy, scruffily heartfelt tunes dealing with love, loss and the messiness of life that help redeem his unarguable songwriting talent.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The lyrics are often sublime, of course, but there are big, stupid choruses too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a beautiful record; so wistful and reflective when it finishes it’ll make you feel instantly nostalgic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The production is smoother, but when Sleeping Lessons morphs from an opiate dream to a riffing stomp with such exhilarating economy, or Red Rabbits wraps drunkenly swaying strings around yet another firmament-bound chorus, you can forgive an occasional excess of slickness.