BBC collective's Scores

  • Music
For 150 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 From Here We Go Sublime
Lowest review score: 40 Yours Truly, Angry Mob
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 150
150 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Not all of Dangerfield's maverick ideas work - he should steer clear of under-accompanied singing for a start - but when they do take off, Guillemots really soar.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A welcome reminder of the Brummie art-poppers’ lighter, brighter past.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The confessional micro-detail of Darnielle’s minimal indie-folk songs – and haunted whine of a voice – remains stoically unchanged.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a one-trick pony album sure, but what a trick.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Heartfelt but sometimes overly polite.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Shot through with attention to detail and the lush production typical of Dunkel’s main concern, Darkel might have its moments of archness but it knows how to shake it’s booty, too.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This may not measure up to The Hour Of Bewilderbeast, but it does boast a batch of sweet and deceptively unfussy, scruffily heartfelt tunes dealing with love, loss and the messiness of life that help redeem his unarguable songwriting talent.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The lyrics are often sublime, of course, but there are big, stupid choruses too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a beautiful record; so wistful and reflective when it finishes it’ll make you feel instantly nostalgic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The production is smoother, but when Sleeping Lessons morphs from an opiate dream to a riffing stomp with such exhilarating economy, or Red Rabbits wraps drunkenly swaying strings around yet another firmament-bound chorus, you can forgive an occasional excess of slickness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Godin and Dunkel are peerless at conjuring a mood, and sonically this is typically impressive, but it needs more foreground, more focus.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Don't expect the gumption of Super Furries, instead bask in the mellow psychedelic ramblings of Gruff unplugged.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Klaxons serve up Day-Glo pagan ritual and pop silliness on toast, and kids get sick on it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A cannily considered, thoroughly de nos jours mix of punk, skiffle and music hall-bred power pop which fizzes with energy and affects a brash charm, but adds little to Barat’s and Doherty’s original blueprint.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's perfect for passing down the crown of Malian desert blues.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s gold here but you need to dig deep.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While still lush in its own grimy way, Ruff Draft represents the harsher, more experimental end of Dilla’s palette.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a fun mess, and although heavily indebted to 60s psyche folk and acid rock, Astronomy For Dogs has a verve and colour that saves it from derivative pastiche.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Coming in 2007 it sounds oddly fresh, but nothing here’s as full-on as their early stuff or as lovely as Feel The Pain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Even the most melancholy moments... have airy jazz arrangements that let them breathe.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At the heart of this album is a trio of absolute killers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Having eschewed the over-earnest knob-twiddling of erstwhile producer Steve Albini, Verity Susman’s vocals and Mia Clarke’s guitars now sound crisp and urgent, and when the envelope gets pushed... the band’s detached cool melts into a pleasing joi de vivre.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite flashes of unexpected vigour, Everybody is ultimately more variation-on-a-theme than it is wheel reinvention.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    NYPC's restrained disco needs to rip it up and get wilder, cos this down‘n’dirty posse is actually cleaner than a Boots cosmetics counter.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Roots And Echoes is an album of songs with all the warmth and familiarity of old leather--and as strangely unexciting as that sounds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Go! Team are clearly committed to the lo-fi, DIY aesthetic, but with songs as strong as these it’s rather a shame they didn’t apply a little depth and finesse to their production.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Good Bad, Not Evil delivers 13 testosterone-crazed grooves which mercifully give finicky revivalism the swerve, in favour of fuzz-frazzled sonics and lots of fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Stately, midtempo tunes whose immaculate production belies the darkness at their core.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A more straightforward affair than previous works, and as such suffers from predictability.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    My Dark Places captures the offbeat brilliance that made the TVPs indie legends in the 70s, characterised by Treacy’s endearingly slapdash attitude towards singing in tune and playing in time.