BBC Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,831 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 What's Going On [40th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 20 If Not Now, When?
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 7 out of 1831
1,831 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a terrific and subtly clever album, a(nother) spirited and worthwhile challenge by Paisley to the prejudices of both sides of country's enduring schism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an album of surprising tenderness, of intricate (and, importantly, memorable) melodies and deep emotions, and everyman ruminations on love and life that will surely connect with long-standing fans and newcomers alike.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the bounty of overdubs, however, there’s little self-indulgence to There Is No Enemy; Martsch’s overloaded approach might scream ‘prog’, but he also possesses a perfectly-disciplined, ‘pop’ songwriting sensibility, with every lengthy instrumental coda married to contagious choruses and melodic barbs that lodge in the mind.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yet despite the melancholy mood, We’re On Your Side is far from depressing. Slaraffenland possess a wistfully melodic knack akin to The Beach Boys if they’d never managed to get off the Sloop John B, and there is much to admire in the multi-faceted arrangements.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bell’s vocals are mountain-fresh like Frida and Agnetha’s and the songs they’ve written are walloping feel-good anthems with the sort of cacophonous choruses that would knock Mika and The Feeling into the middle of next week.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it lacks the freshness that saw it named one of Pitchfork's best albums of last year, there's no doubting that Palomo's best efforts retain their charm a year since they were first heard.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although Stronger with Each Tear may not be one of her greatest works, it ensures that Blige remains as relevant as any of her more recent contemporaries.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Within Spoon's astute use of sunny structure, a brooding heart of murky frustration lurks. A deceptive, addictive album, revelling in hidden depths.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lawrence Arabia's narrator persona, with one foot sternly in the past and the other staggering, trying desperately to get away, loiters before it settles. This makes Chant Darling a charming listen whose dolorous sentiment recurs like a welcome motif, each song taking time to reveal its full charm.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    End Times plays to Everett’s strengths, offering enough intrigue and wonder to keep happy listeners new and old.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    IRM
    At times it is so minimal and skeletal, the songs are in need of intensive care. Yet it is unafraid to rock (Trick Pony, Dandelion) or be resolutely commercial.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are impressive experimental excursions here, too: take Never Say Never, a whirl of backwards beats, twinkling harps and discombobulated vocals that’s both utterly disorientating and quite delightful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More serious but still jittery, and not without detritus, this is the album that will decide the longevity of Los Campesinos!.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most unmistakeable sound on Teen Dream is that of a band truly finding its own voice. In so doing, they may just have minted the new decade’s first essential album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a theme that recurs throughout the record, and, indeed, that defines the Four Tet canon: mesmeric, melody-laden music, with varying degrees of difficulty. There is Love in You should be a fine introductory course.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new sound features a dense, Dave Fridmann-like production: pumping, parping, squelching sounds familiar to those from The Flaming Lips, or MGMT, but rarely coupled to such strong hooks, or vocal performances, by either.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From a palette of familiar reference points, they've created a fresh, vital sound that could prove to be the basis of an impressive career.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a neo-soul record. A very good one, because that’s what she does, her passionate voice bringing abundant personality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Barnett's blue-sky dreaming is actually a pretty accurate description of Hidden – heavily beat-driven, almost entirely absent of guitars, and laced with large amounts of elaborately arranged woodwind and brass. Does it work? Largely, yes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fool’s Gold stretch Western pop templates out into African shapes; and this debut album belies their name by being a genuine gem.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Sea, produced as per the debut by Steve Brown and Steve Chrisanthou, is no self-indulgent lack of tunes-fest. Even at its bleakest--"Closer," say, or "Love's on Its Way," where there is "blood on the streets"--the music and melodies draw you in, and even when they follow their own lushly orchestrated circuitous path, they seem to dare you to drift away.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s experimental but aimed at embracing an audience first and furthering its makers' out-there adventures second. As such, it’s the most instantly rewarding Pit Er Pat album yet, and deserves to take the duo to a new level of recognition.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band’s phlegm-clotted bark and crisp four-chord surges remain intact throughout, whilst at the same time appearing more refined and steadily more adventurous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unicorn is that rarest of things: a record imbued with genuine talent and emotion which wipes the floor with the majority of its makers’ contemporaries, while calling to mind the classic vocals of Karen Carpenter and the pioneering spirit of Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Quite startling.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Perhaps finding mass appeal has given Tim Smith and his band-mates the confidence to take their ideas into darker, brooding waters, and further harness the influence of classic British prog-folk. But whatever the motivation, it's a mood that suits.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album doesn’t bristle with the sonic daring of Dangerfield’s usual work; instead, it offers love songs, largely unadorned with stylistic quirks or brash arrangements, a document of a life pulling into focus.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So, despite promising little, Turn Ons proves to be quite the diverting delight, albeit one you're unlikely to return to once a new Supergrass album arrives.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In The Music Scene, Blockhead has made both pretty melancholic tracks and straight-up thump-the-desk bangers bedfellows, and for that the new decade should be eternally thankful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each track is certainly jam-packed with ideas, but they are woven tight and worked to perfection with the help of producer and mixer Ben Allen (Animal Collective, Gnarls Barkley) who has clearly done a sterling job of making sense of Hynes’ ridiculously overactive imagination.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I’m New Here is an unlikely but triumphant return, packed full of sadness, experience and an underlying feeling of someone making peace with their mistakes and regrets.