Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)'s Scores

  • Music
For 843 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Pinkerton (Deluxe Edition)
Lowest review score: 18 If Not Now, When?
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 843
843 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On Gimme Some, Peter Bjorn and John abandon the experimental sound they'd been developing over the course of the last few years in favor of flavorless alt-rock that falls short of the bar set by Falling Out.
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    To put it simply, Is This Hyperreal? suffers not because the band made a bad album, but because this is the fourth time they've repeated the formula.
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    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    By itself, Mountaintops is a big, dry album that doesn't move you anywhere.
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    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If anything, A Very She & Him Christmas can feel like a wet blanket at times, like a party that just can't get off the ground.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Instead of charm you've got big dramatic gestures at every turn.
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The record sounds tired, dreamy, and wasted in the daylight at five in the afternoon– it tries to be breezy, but instead still feels like 99 degrees of heat.
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Major has a good solid handful of inspired moments, none of this material comes close to approaching the plane as that Fang Island were operating on before.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    God Forgives is consistently, pleasantly underwhelming: the plodding R&B-rooted efforts aside, there's nothing much to complain about.
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    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    They start off well, though, with a trio of solid tracks.... The remaining tracks on the album are equally inoffensive, but they don't have the same half-minded unassuming appeal to help them glide along, and too often there's one too many head-in-your-hands cheesy lines thrown in.
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The most frustrating thing about these eleven songs is that it sounds as if Lidell is shackled by the aesthetic, and it’s totally self-imposed. He’s capable of more.
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Toward the Low Sun staggers to get that momentum, though it does achieve atonement through progression.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 68 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    As an album, it's ultimately too bogged down by its professionalism and erraticism to come together very well.
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Local Business isn't a bad album, but it doesn't completely pull itself off either.
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    • 68 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Like Silica Gel, Sushi isn't a bad album; it's just disappointingly mediocre, and I expect better than that from the psychedelic underground's clown prince of Cool Runnings and backseat-of-grandma's-Oldsmobile Top-40 jams.
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    While the fury remains, there a perceptible dip in quality in nearly every aspect of the Thermals’ formula.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    Nocturnes rates better as an album that sounds better with time, as opposed to Hands’ sugar rush appeal. However, it also retains an uneven quality that can make getting through Nocturnes feel like someone trying to drag the party on a little too long.
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Different Gear, Still Speeding shows that the band is comfortable with themselves and their follow-up has every chance to be a stronger album – especially if they are brave enough to include more styles, even if they won't move beyond their British Invasion inspirations.
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Chopped & Screwed is an interesting concept that would certainly be fascinating to witness live. However, on record, it does not reach more than a curiosity frequently enough to make it worth many repeat plays.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    We have this perfectly pleasant and assuming piece of synth pop, neighing through a vocoder with the dying breath of the shamelessly beaten horse of retro-futurism.
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    This kid may not have the voice of a generation, but there's certainly a demographic he could mean the world to. Once he figures out that it's what he has to say that should guide his singles, rather than what he imagines we want to hear, there may well be a great artist in Yelawolf.
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Wrecking Ball is an album that will reinforce most everyone's preexisting opinion of The Boss, whether they be good or bad.
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    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    It can become background music all too easily: while Silver's work will always have a degree of ambience to it, Exercises can completely disappear from your consciousness if you don't pay enough attention, especially during the last few tracks.
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The end results are still pleasant enough, but can wear thin, even just after five songs.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Ultimately what this record lacks is any sense of audacity or ambition.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Rave Age is an awkward half-step in a couple directions for Vitalic. It's texturally half-baked and predictable.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    Astronomy sounds like a healthy stroll down 90s Alternative Alley, and is as comforting as it is overly familiar; giving it a listen won't change your perspective on music, but it might make you pine for the good old days.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 63 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    The moments of brightness--some poetry here, a brief pop moment there--will get most listeners through the album, but won't inspire them to keep coming back.
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    As it stands, the rest of the record proves to varying degrees that it’s not necessarily reverb or effects that alienate--you can sound just as distant armed with nothing but clean instrumentation and an impenetrable air of disinterest.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 79 Metascore
    • 56 Critic Score
    As is, I Am Very Far is far from a lot of things, the biggest among these is the high bar that Okkervil River has never had a problem exceeding, until now.
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    • 61 Metascore
    • 56 Critic Score
    Apart from the aptly titled "Film Credits," which, worthily, plays much like a ode to Max Richter, the music on the remainder of the album is left to unsatisfying and grey piano suites that don't sound destined for a more open setting nor benefit from the intimate setting of Arnalds' own living room.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 56 Critic Score
    TEEN is another in a long line of mildly interesting but ponderous offshoots from already established bands.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    If you're hoping for change here, give up now. Man on the Moon II: The Legend of Mr. Rager is also presented in five acts, and again has no real structure to justify them.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Ian Parton is capable of more, and his poor decisions and lack of forward-thinking will keep The Go! Team from being more than a great live act unless change is sought for their next record.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    The entire album seems either completely uninspired or absolutely rushed.
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Go With Me is like a big box of popcorn; it's tasty and it can be improved by the circumstances under which you're enjoying it, but by the end you're barely even tasting it anymore, and it certainly won't quell your appetite for a proper meal.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    So much of Still Living is lost to completely monotonous-sounding songs, and while they are mixed impeccably and follow a certain rhythm, it's hard to get through the entire album in one sitting.
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    The National Health is not a poor effort, it's just woefully undistinguished.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Time and time again The Luyas set themselves up in a soft kraut-like groove and fail to progress the song into something different, allowing it to fizzle out after four or five minutes.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 76 Metascore
    • 54 Critic Score
    Its biggest problem is that, from start of finish, it feels strangely reserved.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    With their influences in the right musical zone, we could be hearing some great things from Jacuzzi Boys in the future. Sadly, this release proves that they're not quite there yet.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    There's potential here but it's sadly unrealized.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 66 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    It's an album that alternates between being rewarding and punishing.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    As brief as the moments of goodness may be, they’re lost in a sea of noise that becomes near indistinguishable when taken in one sitting.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    The timbre or the texture of the sounds they make is worth noting while working through Smilewound, but hardly worth returning specifically for.
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    It sounds reaching, like the band is lost and looking desperately for an audience and a voice. I hope they start looking somewhere else.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 60 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    As said, the songs benefit from being taken out of context and as much as that leads to just picking and choosing the moments worth going back for, the process of listening to the EP as a whole can almost be disheartening as much as it is unrewarding.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    Beal appears determined to make his debut as inaccessible as possible. Intentionally crappy instrumentation holds the album back, stealing the focus from what is an incendiary voice--a lot of casual fans will be dumbfounded by this grating, uneasy listening.
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    It's shiny but fluffy, and sure to be a disappointment to those hoping that O'Regan could build on the promise of Special Affectations.
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    The Wilderness isn't really a sum of its parts in that songs might sound okay, if not good on their own, but taken altogether it makes for an album that fails to make it off the ground.
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    It sounds like he's trying to sound less weird, when he doesn't seem to understand that this very weirdness is part of what made him so endearing as a solo artist in the first place.
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    The experimental mindset is evident in moments of Right Thoughts, but only a select few, and like Tonight, it’s most prominent on the last few tracks.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 51 Critic Score
    Maybe they don't care, but ultimately, without any variety or ingenuity on any future albums they might make next, Monotonix might be forever stuck in a rut with nothing to do but party hard.
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    • 66 Metascore
    • 51 Critic Score
    Sure, there is not a bad tune in the bunch, but the problem is that there isn't a particularly good one here, either.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 51 Critic Score
    There are occasions in the album's 45 minutes that are pretty good.
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 51 Critic Score
    They sound like too much like themselves and too much like the others, and even if you discount the pinpoint instrumentation, it's depressingly calculated.
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    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With a collection of songs largely indistinguishable from one another, this album exemplifies the struggle up-and-coming rappers currently face.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At least in name, Heavy Rocks seems to promise a return to form for Boris. It isn't. It certainly manages a return to sludgy riffed-based heaviness, but the spirit of the record's orange prequel is nowhere to be found.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Mylo Xyloto feels like a mixed bag of ideas that never really comes together.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Hopefully we'll hear something redeeming from Gonjasufi, because MU.ZZ.LE is a step in the wrong direction, or even worse, a step backwards.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unless you really enjoy music in commercials, you should avoid this disc.
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While One Second of Love contains this personal touch of sound, it isn't used to potential.
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    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As compelling as their musicianship may be conceptually, it rarely goes the distance on Remembrance of Things to Come.
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Banks is showing some desire to move beyond the design that his career has sustained itself on, but this album shows he's not quite ready to cut the cord.
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    • 57 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Lasers is more an indictment of the state of mainstream rap than anything. This is the absolute worst-case scenario of what can happen when commerce is placed above art, and in this instance it's especially offensive because Lupe is someone who doesn't need to bend over backward to be accessible.
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    We Must Become often hints at Joy Division's stylish brand of post-punk ennui, but by treating it as little more than a gimmick, Maus loses the urgency that makes Curtis's music so endurable.
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    • 60 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Descriptors are hardly necessary for any of these songs because they're all a stone's toss from one another in pretty much every respect.
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    They need to find their identity, and they're going to have to move forward and progress even further as a group if they want to move beyond being a flavor of the month.
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    • 70 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    All the talent in the world can't cover up the fact that Queen of the Wave simply tries too hard and succeeds too infrequently.
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 47 Critic Score
    Garden Of Arms is a disappointment, but by no means a failure; next time Peter Wolf Crier need to not only focus on how to make interesting-sounding songs, but how best to execute them too.
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    This album would not be selling or gaining attention if the band consisted of either of the aforementioned, proving that Share the Joy is nothing worth rejoicing.
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    There are enough moments here to suggest that the band can find a comfortable middle ground between the two sounds that will suit both their aspirations and the desire of the listeners, let's just hope that next time around they find it.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    All signs of growth are forfeit in an attempt to mimic the simple appeal of the material that got him here, right down to the title of the album; another installment in the Famous series, simply with The Album tacked on.
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    • 69 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    It gets repetitive after a while.
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    • 52 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    Unfortunately it's largely downhill from here [after opener "Silence"].
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    These are stories we've already heard told better, and in the same voices.
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    For everyone else, the predictable melodic twists and some truly awful lyrics will likely prove too much to endure.
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    • 66 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    There's nothing wrong with seeking to accomplish the same things your heroes did, but when a band tries only to imitate a few aspects–in this case, detached singing, jangly guitar interplay, and lyrics about teen angst–without offering many of the other aspects that made that band great–like clever storytelling and interesting perspectives--it's always going to fall short. Which Come Of Age does.
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    • 66 Metascore
    • 44 Critic Score
    Raven in the Grave isn't significantly weaker than any of it's predecessors, it's flaws are just significantly more obvious.
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 44 Critic Score
    There's a lot of kinda clichéd and heavy-handed stuff.
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 41 Critic Score
    What Did You Expect has its moments, albeit brief ones.
    • Beats Per Minute (formerly One Thirty BPM)
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By draining the grunge and punk influences from their sound and then over-producing every single song, Lucero have effectively become every Southern rock, blues-inspired bar band you've ever heard.
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