Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,135 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Non-Believers
Lowest review score: 20 Collapse
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 4 out of 1135
1135 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The EP is the perfect cherry on that sweet cake that is Light Up Gold.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More Is Than Isn’t balances vocals with lyricless tracks but at the heart of it all is RJD2’s strength in producing impressive music.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Aside from the nine-minute rambling of “Everything Has to Be Just-so,” (coming at the end of the first disc, making it easy to skip), McCombs pulls off the rare feat of a double-disc that never runs short on inspiration or steam.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Avett Brothers have established a singular style. And with it, a well-deserved reputation that assures their place among the best of the breed.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These 12 songs run a mere 33 minutes, but cover a lot of musical and thematic territory.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sunlight on the Moon is utterly pleasant, slightly off-kilter and melodically memorable, but if you listen to it hard enough, it’s also a bit disturbing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overflowing with strong writing and excellent playing, City Forgiveness earns every minute of its two-CD sprawl.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The strong creative flow guiding this record indicates that the band’s artistic direction wasn’t solely the vision of Smith.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Devour is a completely impressive collection from start to finish.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though occasionally confounding, it inevitably turns out to be time well spent.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is more, almost more than you can take, and it’s better than less any day.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These 14 songs sound as wholly irresistible now as they did when they were such an essential part of a soundtrack for a now-distant decade.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Don’t Tell the Driver is far too gorgeously personal, too hushed, too subtle, too free-rangingly ruminative to ever play out on a public stage. Instead its chaotic swirls, its muted flares of brass, its clackety storms and ebbs of drumming seem destined to play out in private theaters.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only real misstep is the too-funky-for-its-own-good “Snow Your Mind”; otherwise Fulvimar has created another record that will appeal to a wide range of music fans as the indie rockers will give it a thumbs up as will the stoners, psych-mongers and electronic freaks, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Last Patrol is easily Monster Magnet’s strongest LP in years.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He’s brought the whole Destroyer vibe to an entirely non-Destroyer set of material, and you can feel the waves of cool detachment, of stylish artifice wafting off these tunes just the same as always.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Benson’s created an album that stands as his best thus far, a vivid, emphatic encapsulation of pure pop coupled with unabashedly enthusiastic execution.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The experimental sonic world Dosh creates is beautiful and he has created an eerily enchanting one with Milk Money.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No matter what confection the band prepares, the melody is the cake and the trippiness the frosting, making Join the Dots one of the most non-head accessible psych rock records since Tame Impala’s breakthrough.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yet even at its most opaque, Sun Full and Drowning connects subliminally, with its deep reassurances of folk-rock melody, its shimmering, vibrating intersections of interstellar guitar, its grand sonic spaces.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Accessible to a fault, and exceedingly mellow to boot, it flows with a natural ease usually accomplished by those with far more track time under their belt.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The name of this project might be 7 Days of Funk, but there’s enough groove in this mofo to last a lifetime.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For while Costa Blanca superficially suggests a trip to some Euro-trash mall outlet, listen closer and you hear a dark, subversive critique.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s nary a moment missed by the band to demonstrate that Sharon Jones is one of the greatest female vocalist currently operating.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As the title suggests, The River & The Thread manages to surge and sway all at the same time. Indeed, it doesn’t get much better than this.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only 8 songs here so they don’t wear out their welcome and know how to keep the fans wanting more.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, This is Lone Justice: The Vaught Tapes, 1983 may just be the definitive Lone Justice recorded experience.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These two LPs still sound vital two decades later, just as the copious musician tributes and journalist essays in the accompanying pamphlet declare.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost by accident, it seems, you can hear memory, skill and poetry converging in a lonely kitchen with a baby sleeping nearby.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Strong Feelings sums up the sentiments, but it’s the eloquent execution that makes this so sublime.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Hospitality of yore does appear on some of the tracks, but it’s clear the group has pushed itself towards newer territories which, while a little enigmatic at first, suit them perfectly.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What they’ve found, is pop perfection, and Fifth is a contemporary gem.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For a moment or two here, Quilt sounds like a lost Pretty Things track, but as mentioned earlier, this is really their own unique creation. And it needs to be heard right now.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An unassuming venture, but capable and well executed one regardless.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her writing, which here often expresses personal sorrow and fear about separated or lost love (“1923,” “Nothing in My Heart”), is alive to the senses and nature but doesn’t get lost in abstractions about feelings.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kozelek replicates the rhythm of our lives, the tricks of memory, and the portents we later find in seemingly banal moments.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s as good as anyone had hoped.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burn Your Fire For No Witness is a mutual journey in every sense of the term, the signpost of a brave new artist right on the cusp of greatness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the band clearly has an advantage, being able to handpick songs that were already pretty stellar to begin with, credit is due to the hard Working Americans for not simply churning out carbon copies, but slathering plenty of loose blues, jam band raucousness and stoner charm, to make these songs their own.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With her almost stream of consciousness talk-sing, some melodies on Somewhere Else are better formed than others. Like Patti Smith her songs can be as strong ultimately as the care invested in her hooks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While this is Hurray For The Riff Raff’s strongest record to date, it’s doubtful this is a peak. Keep Segarra on your radar.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With this supremely supple and joyous display of early innocence and promise, Aztec Camera showed they already come into their own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though his songwriting skills have rarely come to the fore, the quality of the material here--all of which he wrote, save a pair of covers--makes these tunes first rate.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is not flawless; there are one or two songs that don’t quite hit the high bar Atkins set for herself with this outing. But songs like the drinks-in-the-air sing-along “It’s Only Chemistry” and the instant classic “Sin Song” more than make up for what you pay for this album.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band manages to sound half-inebriated and unbelievably tight at the same time, a loosely strung collaboration that is, nonetheless, completely in sync.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Boy
    Unlike Waits of late, she works hard to not let the songs become just moody soundscapes. She doesn’t always completely achieve this, but does so enough to make this a success.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Take Off and Landing of Everything is another fine release from a band that has yet to steer wrong.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Granduciel’s songs envelop you. As soon as you understand the lyrics for one song, another song buries words in hushed reverb.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re looking for that next hooky, guitar-pop record you could do a lot worse than this.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Abandoned Cities is gorgeous and disturbing and a bit chilling, like old photos hanging on walls about to be demolished, like memory, like loss, like loneliness experienced in the midst of family life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ledges may be a quiet album but it resonates with strong emotions in its own low-key way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Backed by his acoustic guitar, a fiddle player, a bass and little else, Millsap’s record has a timelessness that will preserve it well years from now.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Buy It’s Her Fault, a 12-pack, then enjoy the ride.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All of Mess has an enjoyably menacing feel that will prove inviting to Liars fans and new listeners alike.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chills on Glass may be rock viewed sideways, through a cracked mirror, after 48 hours without sleep, but it is till the recognizable thing. As such, it fits uncomfortably into the places you’ve made for rock, jarring you even as it feeds you.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gallon Drunk’s whiskey goes down rough on The Soul of the Hour, but the lingering after-burn is the best part.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the second album by Minneapolis four-piece Howler, an energy level worthy of forebears the Replacements, Soul Asylum and even, in places, Husker Du is dialed up, making such tracks as the thrumming/thrashy “Indictment” and the hardcore-tilting “Drip” buzz around the listener’s head like so many hornets.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More than any previous Timber Timbre record, Hot Dreams simmers sonically with the chaos lurking just below these surfaces. Rarely does such calm feel so utterly foreboding.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Davenport and his crew aren’t doing anything here completely out of the ordinary (for them, anyway) with a batch of songs this strong it might stand as his best.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s little doubt Here Be Monsters will one day be considered the album that ensures Langford’s legacy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall there’s a principled (but never overbearing) humanism guiding her worldview. And her songs definitely rock, if never in a way that overpowers her words.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She long ago proved herself worthy of the family legacy, but Carter Girl would be a highlight of her substantial discography regardless of familial stamp.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Tarpaper Sky, he can clearly claim one of the finest albums of a sterling 40-year career.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rarely do mistakes of one’s youth sound so beautiful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not flawless, but damn it’s still a fine effort from beginning to end.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of the songs here are better than others (even with more than four decades of hanging out with everyone from Willie Nelson to Keith Richards, there is only so much cred you can breathe into a Paul Anka song), but there is hardly any track here that hasn’t earned the right to stay.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A free-form lyrical approach leads Vangaalen into phantasmically beautiful byways, with both the music and the words floating up and away.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His vocals are delivered with such breezy casualness, you almost miss the poetry in the words. Pair that with the brilliant musicianship and it’s simply confounding that Bare and his band aren’t as big as groups like Arcade Fire and My Morning Jacket at this point.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While this isn’t an earth shattering album, it is a solid one which serves as a reminder of what a talent she can be when she decides to get in touch.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lack of predictability appears to guide Finn’s pursuits, making for a white knuckled ride all the way.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Establishing her forceful new identity from the start, Goodman makes music with an infectious enthusiasm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Easy Pain, the trio go full fang on this fourth LP, harkening back to the most extreme aspects of Louisville loudness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Syd Arthur avoids any whiff of trendiness and just gets down to the business of writing and performing timeless music on its second record Sound Mirror.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Meteorites is a clarion call to all of their followers, from the Flaming Lips to Interpol, that Echo & The Bunnymen have finally come back to reclaim their rightful place back in front of the spotlight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sunbathing Animal offers up lucky-13 tracks and nary a stale song.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is an album that’s unfailingly engaging, and, unsurprisingly, wholly exceptional at that.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Modern Creation may not their best collections of songs--that honor is still held by 2012’s Enjoy the Company--but there’s still some damn fine tunes to be found here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These 12 songs can work individually or as a whole, depending on your mood and in the end they’ve done it again, one of 2014′s best.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s arrangements and standout musicianship--including pedal-steel and slide guitarist Greg Leisz and Henry’s son Levon on clarinet--is a reminder that Henry’s extraordinary production work is second to none.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an essential CD for both the serious and casual fan.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chock full of affirmation and illumination, Bright Side of Down is just the perfect pick-me-up for these frequently turbulent times.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result of the collaboration is a gorgeous set of songs set in late-night bars after work, as denizens tell their stories with the appropriate tenor of resignation and hope.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Weird Little Birthday is one of those albums that sounds like nothing much the first couple times you hear it, before you begin to lock onto the war between musical ease and lyrical dislocation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like most prolific artists, Willie can be hit or miss with his offerings. This latest one lands the target dead on.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lion is certainly king of its own dark and sublime, concrete industrial jungle. It roars strong and, at times, purrs in all the right places.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Alvins don’t tamper with Broonzy’s basic template, and truth be told, their feisty renditions of “All By Myself,” “Key to the Highway,” “Big Bill Blues” and practically every other song on this set sound as if they’re of a vintage variety.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Apparently Cartwright exorcised his punk rock demons with Desperation, as Shattered is the band’s most accessible record yet.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here, together again, they pick up more or less where they left off, slipping subdued hooks into strummy reveries and spiking easy breezy tunes with jarring, occasional violent lyrics.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Provider was Webb reveling moment-to-moment in a new life, Free Will comes to terms with the fact that the more you live, the less you know.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not carry quite the swagger of Sweet Apple’s first album, but The Golden Age of Glitter still proves to be shiny indeed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Muffs fans, then, are the ultimate winners here, as it sounds like Shattuck & Co. are having the collective time of their life.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band allegedly recorded this one just for fun, with little intention of ever releasing it. You know a group has hit its stride when even its goof offs are worth releasing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What you end up with on End Times Undone, is a trance-y, pop-psych, hypno-rhythmic romp that showcases a group of players that have magically meshed into a single hive-mind, behind the very talented Mr. K., at the top of his game.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, this is a record full of brilliant Richard Thompson songs given strong readings.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Country Funk II is an archivist’s delight.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nobody has ever really sounded like Chrome but Chrome, and that makes Feel It Like a Scientist sound as fresh now as it did back in the bad old days.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Manipulator represents a defining statement from a musician that should enjoy a long, healthy career to come.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Louis Armstrong may have provided the raw material for Ske-Dat-De-Dat: The Spirit of Satch, but make no mistake: this is a Dr. John LP through-and-through. As it should be.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shovels & Rope displays a firm grip on its craft on Swimmin’ Time, and a willingness to use it in service of any stylistic boulevard it chooses to walk.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    El Pintor is not Antics or Turn on the Bright Lights, there are not as many immediate hooks and riffs that were present on these earlier releases; instead, the solid music on El Pintor unveils a nuanced mellowing that has taken over the last two releases from Interpol.