Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,315 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Undun
Lowest review score: 20 That's Why God Made the Radio
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 7 out of 1315
1315 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A Wasteland Companion belies its foreboding title, largely eschewing the hushed introspection that's cast a pall over previous efforts in favor of, well, a sound that's at least marginally more hopeful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pan
    With Pan the band has created an album that places them squarely amongst the pantheon of musicians they so obviously adore.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only four songs on here but it's a good four songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thomas Brenneck has crafted ten seamlessly funky and beautifully played and arranged instrumental tracks in search of a film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of the two disparate methods of performance made for quite an extraordinary menagerie of styles that will definitely appeal to hip-hop, art pop and world music fans alike.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These 14 songs sound as wholly irresistible now as they did when they were such an essential part of a soundtrack for a now-distant decade.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an essential CD for both the serious and casual fan.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Apparently Cartwright exorcised his punk rock demons with Desperation, as Shattered is the band’s most accessible record yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This band seems poised for some kind of breakthrough and Tiger Talk seems as a good a place as any for this to happen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is not a single track on this record that doesn’t belong, each nearly flawless in their own way.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs may not scan perfectly or make much objective sense, but they feel very real and relevant and uncalculated.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An exceptionally strong debut record, Soul Power will make you believe in the title concept.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pink City is her prettiest, most cohesive work yet. It’s well-constructed enough to showcase the weirdness that crops up in her songs without making her seem like a novelty act.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This artistic upgrade from their previous work is further enhanced by a significant expansion of their sonic arsenal, including piano, cello, Mellotron and female backing vocals courtesy of Crystal Stilts/Dum Dum Girls/Vivian Girls drummer Frankie Rose.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What he does best is craft heart-string cautionary tales.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s nary a moment missed by the band to demonstrate that Sharon Jones is one of the greatest female vocalist currently operating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Berkeley To Bakersfield is the perfect shotgun rider for any road trip. With the breadth of its variety no other music passengers need be invited along for the ride.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It has the breadth, intelligence, mystery and ambitious arrangements of a major work. With 19 songs, it's maybe a touch too long, but almost every song is vivid in its poetry and instrumental coloration.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost by accident, it seems, you can hear memory, skill and poetry converging in a lonely kitchen with a baby sleeping nearby.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All said and done, thumbs up on Polizze’s songwriting, the trio’s playing, as well as production work on Weirdon.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a fantastic record, powerful in its calmness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a fierce, fun and unforgettable album that would be an achievement for a singer/songwriter of any age, but particularly for one on the far side of 60.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result of the collaboration is a gorgeous set of songs set in late-night bars after work, as denizens tell their stories with the appropriate tenor of resignation and hope.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are new elements here, but they've been brought into a foundation so strong they cannot help but fit in on only on Yo La Tengo's terms.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dire and descriptive, You Can’t Go Back If There’s Nothing To Go Back To numbing melancholia is uncommonly compelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With consistently strong songwriting and an intrepid grasp on its own talent, the Joy Formidable has in Wolf's Law a near-perfect follow-up record: it moves the band forward while staying true to what made it appealing and exciting in the first place.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Royal Headache's debut begins in a pounding, pummeling riff-based rampage, all double-timed guitar strumming and frantic one-two drumming. "Never Again," the lead off track, runs as fast and hard and ragged as any punk anthem, taking the corners with two wheels off the ground.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A free-form lyrical approach leads Vangaalen into phantasmically beautiful byways, with both the music and the words floating up and away.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lion is certainly king of its own dark and sublime, concrete industrial jungle. It roars strong and, at times, purrs in all the right places.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With U feels fresh, new and mysterious.