Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,056 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Spirit in the Room
Lowest review score: 20 That's Why God Made the Radio
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 3 out of 1056
1,056 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While none of the songs are deeply political or poetic like the wartime bands that predated Tame Impala, they are no less poignant and often delve into a reflective sadness of longing to belong.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Odds show that Fugazi doesn't need to reunite in order to make music that still very much matters.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Weird, raw and beautiful all at once.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Yin & Yang is an earth shattering 45 minutes of street urchin dub punk that not only reveals This Is PiL for the anti-climactic milquetoast sham that it was, but re-establishes the true soul of Public Image as it was originally intended by the vast sum of its initial parts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The lift-off and liberation come subtly, bearing the masterful marks of men who've learned the value of compositional patience (it's no coincidence that Cave and Ellis have also forged a successful partnership as film scorers). This, ultimately, makes the emotional devastation you experience once the record has spun all the more remarkable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There's a warmth and life in these songs that goes beyond tribute or reenactment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a holiday classic in waiting, even if you don’t own a single pair of skinny jeans and couldn’t grow a beard to save your life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hurricane is her first new album since 1989, and it's her best ever.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tha Funk Capital Of The World, is one of his best ever records as a front man and one of the most outrageously funky records released in years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gob
    GOB is heavyweight hip-hop from one of urban England's brightest new talents of microphone mastery.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nothing is Wrong is a terrific follow-up for a band that delivers beautiful, powerful music straight from their own hearts and right to yours. Believe.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The change-up [writing exclusively on the keyboard] proved to be the best thing to happen for the duo, especially for Boeckner, a guitarist by trade whose embrace of the analog synth helped open a whole new world of expression for him as a songwriter.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like 2008's The Living And The Dead, Blood leans on judicious electric guitar solos, most often from Shahzad Ismaily, who co-produced the album, but also from Grey Gersten and, on one track, Marc Ribot.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An equally engaging sonic concept entitled Drums Between The Bells.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is a wellspring of the bandmates' combined creativity and an ode to free-spirited artistic expression. Bravo.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most conspicuous element of Last Summer is the simplicity of the music.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not often that an album has this much to offer, intellectually, physically and spiritually. This is not just another sterile bedroom disco experiment, far from it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album in a nut shell? The Grand Theatre, Volume Two is the soundtrack to a chaotic night at the tavern followed by clarity the morning after--melodiously rowdy, then harmoniously depressed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a solid collection of songs and some enormously creative and varied approaches to playing them, Stranger Me is the best work yet of an artist likely to continue growing further.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    How sharply Holland expresses his rage, how clearly his disappointment reveals betrayed idealism....Strong stuff.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a deeply humane album, it makes poetry out of the disappointments of daily existence and narrative out of the mistakes that people make.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lovingly named after Rod Serling's cult post-Twilight Zone program and, in all intents and purposes, is just as thrilling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album teems with strong songs and performances.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all the new sonic waves undulating through this record, however, the band's distinctive identity still shines--there's no mistaking Marble Son for the work of anyone else, and it's the ability to evolve while still remaining true to core values that makes Jesse Sykes & the Sweet Hereafter great.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Rip Tide is moderate in ambition, and hardly a masterwork, if such things empirically exist.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These Merritt wonder-tonics may not curl your hair or cure any ailment, but they act as a salve to a multitude of human conditions. Best to stock up and be prepared.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A tripped-out masterpiece of transcendental space fuzz that pays tribute to the ruins of Italy that goes beyond the headiest moments of Pink Floyd's legendary performance inside of that coliseum in Pompeii.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This artistic upgrade from their previous work is further enhanced by a significant expansion of their sonic arsenal, including piano, cello, Mellotron and female backing vocals courtesy of Crystal Stilts/Dum Dum Girls/Vivian Girls drummer Frankie Rose.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a talented quartet of musicians in tow--Thompson, Shawn Camp, Bryn Davies and Kenny Malone--the acoustic setting provides newcomers with an ideal introduction and gives longtime fans further reason for ongoing appreciation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the kick of recognition of the distinctive styles and contributions of each member is part of the pleasure, the album sounds like the product of a group, of a powerful force of equals. And it's all the better for it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Campbell is at the top of his game even at closing time. If there's no more to come then this is as good a spot as any to ring down the curtain.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If this all sounds sort of strange or back-handed, that can be attributed to the fact that Strange Mercy takes a few listens to grasp, and it makes the repeat visits enticing. And that's a sign of a strong album.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Optimism hasn't always been a hallmark of Doe's endeavors, but it ought to be said that this less-dour Doe is easy to enjoy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Without sounding anything like Pet Sounds, Seeds We Sow indicates Buckingham has absorbed Wilson's lessons well.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Father, Son, Holy Ghost contains some of the deftest songwriting of 2011, and is more than a worthy successor to the group's debut.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dreams Come True will certainly appeal to anyone who enjoys their new wave artful and avant-garde, both of which are delivered in spades across this exceptional LP that will surely be lost on many Grizzly Bear fans looking for an extension of their sonic safety net.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After 14 years they show no signs of slowing down and you know what you don't want them too because they haven't even come close to sucking. It's a win win for all of us.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By focusing more on originality and the aural progression of this album, Neon Indian is clearly honing their craft and proving that the musical trend they helped to create, won't be going out of style anytime soon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Robert Earl Keen is a master storyteller who blends acoustic, nylon and steel guitar with solid percussion and his pure, distinct voice into the finest Americana has to offer.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The last song, a sparse electric guitar ballad, identifies another dualism: it's called "Get It Wrong, Get It Right," and like most of the rest of this unsettled album, it gets it right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are 13 terrific cuts out of 15, and the album does it's job of demonstrating that the 5 Royales deserve reconsideration.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bennett harbors a magic about him that inspires you to become caught up in the beauty of his performance prowess regardless of what artist is playing second banana to him on the microphone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yet aside from that one cut, Megafaun's self-titled album seamlessly integrates an easy-going tuneful-ness with a nearly mystical devotion to tone and texture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Devil's Walks minimal electronic landscape is mesmerizing and perfect for a quiet, rainy day of contemplation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The trademark ingredients that turned Hollywood Town Hall and Tomorrow the Green Grass into seminal classics are retained via Olson's yearning vocals, the sun splashed harmonies and their adept meld of Americana, vintage West Coast rock, strings and psychedelia.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seasons on Earth is like a wry, forgiving smile set to music, its pleasures veined with melancholy, its ruefulness buoyed by hope.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's Apocalypse a-go-go for the Georgia gentlemen. Go with them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I Wake Up Screaming is an absolute delight, a rhythmically exhilarating, lyrically humorous, melodically intoxicating collection of thirteen terrific songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The operatics of her voice make it the most intriguing instrument on the album but the new exploration of violins and cellos that feminize the massive drum fills make Conatus even more astounding.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While obviously studying their heroes with a fine tooth comb, Big Troubles has done a perfect job of combining past and present guitar pop into one 30 minute stew.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In crafting an album that’s filled with largess, they give their fans a work that genuinely seems destined for the ages.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wolfroy Goes to Town haunts you quietly, in a private way that is, somehow, all the more devastating.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Biophilia is a delicate and highly tactile treat, a unique gem of innovation (pipe organs driven by computers, the mallet-tickled gameleste) and gentle real soul whose breathy endearing heights Bjork hasn't touched in a minute.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Given the complex menagerie of moods and movements interpolated amongst the din of this septet of songs, it seems like the man has indeed accomplished his mission.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All together, this is a very classy compilation, and an essential piece of the global puzzle of 20th century music.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At any rate, Behind the Parade lobs another handful of Keene klassiks into the katalogue.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As always, Russell's articulate arrangements embolden the material and give them the grit it deserves.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an elegant product of hard work and musicianship that shouldn't be dismissed because it is not entirely new material.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It feels like a declaration of purpose instead, made all the stronger for having passed through the crucible of Bachmann's doubts, through the armor breaks, and straight into-and from-the heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gonzalez paints broad strokes on this vast musical landscape, and although a wee long, Hurry Up, We're Dreaming may be his conceptual masterpiece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He still has plenty to communicate, his music not losing any creative potency over the years.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A fine batch of bittersweet pop songs that are nearly impossible to ignore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not one single note on this record fails to contribute something to the overall mood.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Perhaps the most tangible set of songs he has produced yet.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Isaak has somehow managed to make the homage almost as enjoyable as the originals. Almost.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An entertaining album that follows no musical rules, a record interconnected by one common denominator--that there happily isn't one.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of his best work, however, comes under the guise of his own name, as is the case with Crow's new album, He Thinks He's People.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only four songs on here but it's a good four songs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of the two disparate methods of performance made for quite an extraordinary menagerie of styles that will definitely appeal to hip-hop, art pop and world music fans alike.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Peggy Sue's Acrobats is one of the most scattered, schizophrenic, soul questioning--and beautiful and best records of the year.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not a weak track on the album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gentle introspection--instead of the outright melancholy he often exudes--paired with sway-worthy melodies make Parallax the most listenable Atlas Sound album to date.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Harding's adept at melding a simple slice of life with irresistible refrains, and that's what allows The Sound of His Own Voice to soar ever so sweetly.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What he does best is craft heart-string cautionary tales.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a happy, bright trance, not necessarily to be avoided. C'mon. Dive in.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Freeclouds balances strummy, acoustic campfire sensitivity with sweeping, anthemic rock a la sometime tour mates in the War on Drugs, tipping both styles into wild, mildly psychotropic territories.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Swimming in catchy melodies and tantalizing music (along with Wilson's vocal abilities), it may be difficult to select a favorite track within Glowing Mouth--but it's quite easy to enjoy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs may not scan perfectly or make much objective sense, but they feel very real and relevant and uncalculated.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He and his group put everything they could into every track--or at least the every one collected here.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The remastered discs sound great.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hum-worthy ditties that suggest Artificial Heart is definitely the real deal.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No other LP is more evocative of the raw essence of the Smashing Pumpkins' unique fusions of feels than this ten track collection, by far and away the most collaborative album in their canon.... This deluxe edition of Gish is chock-a-block with quality bonus material.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is nary a pair of finer testaments to the purity of the original SP sound than the group's first two albums, both of which have been beautifully remastered and generously expanded [here].
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    El Camino offers, like they say in Spinal Tap, something none more black, lean mean T-Rex-ish blues party pop (because the melodies are audaciously and apologetically catchy) that spirals nearly out of control yet is reigned in (really?!?) by producer Danger Mouse at his most spare and frame making.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With U feels fresh, new and mysterious.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sit back, dig The Cambodian Space Project, and be prepared to be impressed. Very impressed.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of hardcore punk songwriting and a pop tunesmith's sense of melody and composition gives the latest venture for this DC scene giant an appeal entirely unique to its branch on the family tree.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hazed Dream is the perfect place for you to tune in and turn on.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Count Yer Lucky Stars is sure to be high on the critics' picks again and finally garnering the band the limelight they so richly deserve.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Let's Go Eat The Factory proves that the pioneers of lo-fi still do it best.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reconvened 17 years later, Cardinal shows their hushed melodies and chamber pop sensibilities gel just as well now as they did originally.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No one could have predicted that they'd get to Attack on Memory's savage impact so quickly, or indeed, at all. No telling where they'll go from here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not all of the songs are hits ("Met Before" falls way short as a flat, unmemorable filler), but it's much more cohesive and really helps Chairlift establish a more recognizable sound.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's plenty more good and bad.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Urick is a remarkable electronic musician who pushes mainstream music to its outer limits, and as the listener explores those outer limits, expect goose bumps to appear on the skin.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 5 songs in 16 minutes breeze by, barely after you've had a chance to absorb them, leave you hungering for more.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Van Halen have found their dazzle without a hassle.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coming in at 11 songs, there is hardly a weak one on Go Fly a Kite and no real need to call out one track over the next, as all are pretty much worth the price of the album.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Black Session is a fitting testament to the current state of one of the English underground's most unshakable acts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What sets the Fray apart is that they use their music to tell other people's stories in literate, compelling ways.