Boston Globe's Scores

For 2,006 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
2006 music reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you didn’t already, it even makes you appreciate Swift’s stealth songwriting, particularly when scaled to its essence.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [Silver Age is] an album not just reminiscent of but worthy of comparison to his best '90s material.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s prime Mazzy Star, the work of a band that knows what it does well. And then does it beautifully
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rice’s Fantasy, coproduced by Rick Rubin, is often dark and beautiful, featuring dramatic orchestrations, intricate arrangements, and hushed, swooning vocals.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With the assistance of ace songwriter-producer-multi-instrumentalist Wayne Kirkpatrick "The Reason Why" does what all good records should do: It makes you laugh, cry, hoot, holler, and breaks your heart.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are surprisingly encouraging. Flavor Flav, having been turned by VH1 into even more of a caricature (if possible) than he already was, reminds PE fans that he is still a competent and efficient hypeman, and Chuck D sounds angrier and rawer than he has in years.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even with such hitmaking producers as Calvin Harris and Diplo on board, Magic Hour is refreshingly out of step with current tastes in pop music.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album has a movie score feel, but this time every track is its own short film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    SMD sounds like it's found a handle on its sound.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This time, there are moments of eye-opening wonder.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The three brothers and a cousin reconnect the dots of their career and interrelationships in an impressively catchy set of 11 songs.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For an album that’s seemingly been in turnaround for so long, Broke sounds very much of the moment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost every song is a gem, the lyrics thoughtful and melodies memorable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The intense and intensely bearded Maine singer-songwriter showcases a lighter side on his superbly crafted third disc.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    21
    Mostly, though, 21 sounds as though it was built around Adele's presence.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Cult reunites with two former collaborators--producers Bob Rock and Chris Goss--with satisfyingly brawny results.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pulling the entire effort back from the precipice of cliché is the immediate charisma of vocalist Megan James, particularly engaging when hurdling over cleverly constructed lines of wordplay.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While each movement works on its own, Elements is best experienced in one long pass.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The dizzying succession of beats per minute paired with thoughtful lyrics about music's role in shaping memories gives Saint Etienne a chance to create a rare entity: Dance music for the thinking person.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Never is frank, fearless, and restless--a 14-song rattle bag of damaged samples, uneasy hooks, intuitive melody, and dry humor.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Following an uncharacteristic hiatus, singer-songwriter Ryan Adams returns with this lovely, low-key effort.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Keys has rarely ever sounded so at ease, so downright sensual, as she does as her latest.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Proving itself to be more than a reunion cash-in, Heaven & Hell--the re-brand for Black Sabbath with Ronnie James Dio on vocals--has a batch of new material that is every bit as menacingly delightful as 2007's concert tour that revived the lineup after 15 years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's not a lot of replay value in Björk's new mode, but it still works humbly well and the computer visuals go a long way toward expanding on the fragile, chamber orchestra feel of the music.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her vivid miniatures of complicated intimacies and everyday inadequacies slip between the cracks of country, folk, and rock, and they're as graceful as they are unflinching.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Evermotion is an airy, winsome release that puts less focus on guitars, dabbling instead in horns and electronic and new wave sounds, to terrific, moody effect.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From its length (18 songs, 66 minutes) to its guest list (Kanye West, Rod Stewart, Danger Mouse, Lil Wayne, Yasiin Bey, M.I.A.), the album is as much a large-scale production as his debut was. But it’s done on Rocky’s terms, with every element enhancing the sound that he laid out on his initial mixtape.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Harper leaves a few arrows unstrung from his deep musical quiver here, but the ones he fires all seem to hit their mark.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Halestorm’s third album is packed with straightforward mud-in-your-eye rockers, but also throws enough stylistic curveballs to set it apart from the crowd.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    April, the third Sun Kil Moon album by Kozelek and friends, has several such sweet spots, the kind we hope will never end.