Boston Globe's Scores

For 2,006 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
2006 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the sound of Flesh Tone is electro cool, the songs reveal a deep humanity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sound & Color makes clear this success was not a fluke. This is the sound of a band that’s in it for the long haul, amplifying what worked the first time, and stretching in new directions to challenge both the performers and their listeners.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music throughout is sequenced brilliantly, with a cohesion that almost defies logic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A sudden 69 minutes of Drake binging on hypnotic soundscapes, spitting out gleefully hung-over flows.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This collection of live radio performances from the band's early years is like a letter from an old friend long delayed in the post.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taylor’s tunes build and build like good dramas; he tells stories through song, and the music does the talking as much as the lyrics do.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The boys got most of the attention on “American Idol’’ last season, but fourth-place finisher Allison Iraheta has the last laugh with the most consistent debut album thus far.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is dark and menacing, and also better than the first "Trill," even if Bun doesn't threaten to slap anyone in the face with a pie a la mode.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a time when guitars serve more often as props than as centerpieces, this album is a wondrous reminder that the simplest palette can be used to paint the most profound results.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kindred is also the group’s most unsinkable album, barreling through the speakers with muscular, glossy synths and the jittery tension between Angelakos’s tangy falsetto and what he’s actually saying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the kind of artistic leap every band hopes to make.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When the album finished, I immediately wanted to hear it again. And then again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album casts the duo in a new light that may not quite eclipse their former work, but it has set them well on their way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even though she doesn't get the same kind of attention as some of her peers do, Angie Stone is a supreme talent, and this album really shows it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her voice is huskier, veined with the fine lines of age, but that only enhances the sultry sound of the Vineyard's favorite songbird.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Med sud, the band proves its indie-pop potential while remaining rooted in its unique brand of spaced-out alt-rock.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One thing we do know after listening to Leucocyte--the Esbjorn Svensson Trio's grandest achievement--is that its leader had much more to say, much more to explore.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heart devotees should appreciate these new updates on their classic sound.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all of the scorching discordance (Gustafsson's ambitious "Sudden Movement"), there are also passages of divine lyricism ("Golden Heart," "What Reason"). A welcome return.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some People Have Real Problems reveals the other Sia: plucky, bubbly, and growling purposefully through assertive pop songs.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A bright, challenging album.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Cambridge collective employs its considerable--and considerably appealing--strengths with gleeful assurance. Euphoric cross-hatched harmonies; gobs of fuzzy, low-end guitars; and various embellishments (mellotron, organ, Casio synth guitar, etc.) make the whole shebang sound like one big, loopy carousel ride at a cracked carnival.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's strong, supple stuff by a strong bunch of women.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He does what he does best, delivering finely wrought, elegantly arranged songs of subtle depth and rich musicality, many extending past five minutes without overstaying their welcome.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band's sophomore disc, which teems with drama and dark dollops of piano that swarm beautifully around singer-guitarist Tom Smith's clarion-call voice, continues to make good on the hype while again drawing on the past.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The indie troubadour spins out his trademark blend of vintage country-folk that begs to be played on an old turntable and heard through the screen door. Fortunately, great music transcends its medium.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With electrifying cameos from Chicago’s Vince Staples and song-stealing Dreezy, these vital, relevant tracks remind how good Common can be when he’s focused.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An unfamiliar listener coming in cold to Yeasayer’s second full-length album probably wouldn’t make it too much further than the opener, “The Children.’’ It’s a choppy, dirge-like downer, the soundtrack to a spooky submarine’s descent into the abyss in cinematic slow motion. But it would be a tragic mistake to abandon ship on this avant-pop Brooklyn trio just before the fun starts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mockingbird Time revisits what made the Louris-Olson Jayhawks truly distinctive: the omnipresent, twining, joyous interplay of their voices. That pairing is here again in full force.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Using her piano, guitar, and rhythm tracks as both weapon and comforter, Nash skips lightly from ultra-contemporary hip-hop grooves to jaunty pop melodies that harken back to Motown and the Fab Four, all while retaining a keen lyrical eye for her own sense of joy, doubt, and power.