Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,676 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
1,676 music reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ink mostly relies on a nasal singsong flow that, too often, accidentally detours into monotony over slickly produced club beats borrowed from better sources.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s an identity crisis in the way the band veers radically from hard-edged rock to slick, superficial pop. There are too many lyrical cliches.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This overlong record feels labored and bereft of new ideas.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As always, he’s superb executing tender acoustic love songs.... His ventures onto the dancefloor are far less assured.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If [a band] goes back to the well once too often, it can be derided for stagnating. If it takes a left turn, fans may bemoan the change of pace. Neon Trees, the Utah band behind the unavoidable “Animal” and “Everybody Talks,” seem to have split the difference on their third effort.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nikki Nack is ear candy, crammed with shards of looped instruments poking their heads above ground like skittish gophers and odd, counterintuitive vocal rhythms.... Unfortunately, too many songs have so much sugar-rush action, like the judder and clack of “Find a New Way,” that they fly apart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While the ambition and musical dexterity is admirable, the work doesn’t feel fully realized.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the deluxe treatments, the tracks on Nausea tend to blend into a blur, and their richness sometimes seems at odds with Vallesteros’s maudlin charms. Fans of “Labor” may be left wondering if beige is really a step up from gray.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There is one half of a solid album in A.K.A., Jennifer Lopez’s first new release in three years.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What Is This Heart? often feels uncomfortably intimate, which cuts both ways..
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While still frequently predictable lyrically, Thicke also occasionally takes a couple of steps away from his formula. But even cursory knowledge of their split makes this public and emotionally messy and revealing ploy for reconciliation teeter on, and sometimes fall over, the borderline into creepy territory.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The lyrics leave no room for subtext--“Good girls,” goes the kickiest song’s thesis, “are bad girls that haven’t been caught”--and the gleaming instrumentation sounds untouched by human hands.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A good sound can only support wobbly songs so far, and the middle third of the album sinks into a deadly lull that suggests the band only sporadically knows how to pull off slower tempos.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Backed by mostly familiar trap music production, Jeezy is steady (“Been Getting Money” is especially fine), but hardly inspired.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The new effort often feels forced and rushed, with an overdose of stylized ’50s jargon.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The music, executive produced by Pharrell, is inviting, soulful, and sonically inventive (the mournful “Light ’Em Up RIP Doe B” is especially impressive). The rhymes and subjects are so stale, though.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s as if Idol stumbled into a Renaissance Faire, answered someone’s questions about his old hits, then decided to record it, surveying his lazy, crazy, drug-hazy Sunset Strip days to the accompaniment of flutes and lutes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The music is a bright, shiny, and bland pastiche of electronic pop and faint nods to new wave and R&B. And the songwriting feels generic, a departure from the personable details that have made her a unique voice.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    You can admire its uncompromising spirit, but you can just as easily loathe its saccharine sound. After hearing some of these songs live in their acoustic forms, it’s jarring to see how Young has neutered them on record.... The album’s saving grace is its deluxe edition, which presents all 10 songs in stripped-down, intimate settings that allow you to savor and bask in their beauty.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While RZA’s desire to evolve is laudable (drumline, terrific), the flawed musical execution on sluggish tracks “Ron O’Neal,” “Miracle,” and “Preacher’s Daughter” is at odds with the rappers’ combustible virtuosity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    An unfortunate monotony sets in with the slow tempos, but Nelson’s acoustic guitar provides some life on Django Reinhardt’s “Nuages.” This appears to be a special album for Willie; whether it will be so for his fans is open to debate.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    He’s undeniably an intelligent MC with a sense of social justice, which makes all the half-realized ideas, indulgence, and misogyny (clueless “No Role Modelz”) puzzling.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Almost every song has a mournful tone, and too many sound alike: slow, ponderous ballads steeped in negativity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There are other winners here: “The Mephistopheles of Los Angeles” (sheer autobiography by Manson) and the unexpected “Killing Strangers,” a slow, dirgey track that appears to pinpoint a terrorist’s mind-set: “We got guns, you better run, we’re killing strangers.” Elsewhere, the album often flounder.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    "The Weirdness" is raw, but where's the power?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A wildly uneven record.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's an ornate, dizzying affair, where all his interests and talents collide in one brazen gesture. It's impressive in scope, but where does that leave the listener? Possibly with a headache.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This collection is filled with half-baked ideas and shallow reminiscences, a pair of dated rockers, and one meditation on mortality that manages to be maudlin and bubble-headed at the same time. It smacks of Wings at its goofiest.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The acoustic half... overshoots mere serenity and lands in a much sleepier place.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Throughout Paper Walls, band members work themselves into laughable tizzies of teen angst, propelled by Key's capable-but-whiney voice and his bandmates' capable-but-generic uptempo rock.