Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,576 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Moolaadé
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
5576 movie reviews
  1. Married to the Mob is a funny yard sale of a film about regeneration in a junked-up America. [19 Aug 1988]
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Freaky Friday version 2003 is a shinier, snappier animal, partly because young girls now dress like Avril Lavigne, and partly because Jamie Lee Curtis has her best role in years and knows it.
  2. On screen something happens that goes beyond Monk's powers of description and Fanning's way of seeming 14 and 44 at the same time.
  3. A movie loaded with strange delights.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A drably directed yet terrifically affecting drama about family bonds, classic rock, and the human brain. It's sentimental, yet so honest and eccentric that it rises above schmaltz.
  4. The documentary is elliptical, with a slow, drifty rhythm. It presents an up-close but impersonal view of Eggleston.
  5. At its core, Quinceañera, a modest but remarkably poignant comedy, is the story of a neighborhood.
  6. Viola owes much of the pleasure it offers to the sorts of things one looks for in any good movie: an attractive cast, attractively photographed in an attractive location, and plotting that manages to feel relaxed without being lazy.
  7. There is no plot in Pen-ek Ratanaruang's exceedingly mellow situation comedy, and that's preferred, frankly.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Smart, sick, and subversive, Super gives you what you want only to make you wonder why you want it.
  8. The documentary nicely mixes vintage news footage and photographs, talking-head interviews with journalists and Koch associates, and lots (and lots) of Koch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie wins you over through crack comic timing and an awareness that the point of driving isn't how fast you get there but what you see on the way.
  9. Dunst is the realest, rawest thing in the film.
  10. As luminous as the star presence at its center. It's at once a touching teacher movie and an even more touching love story.
    • Boston Globe
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A thought-provoking and graceful portrait of a tenacious peace warrior whose frankness is his greatest weapon.
  11. A juicy and gratifying teacher movie (a genre to which I'm partial). The joy in performance shared by Connery and Brown is the big reason.
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The oddest moment in this riveting documentary comes when Marina Abramovic, the performance artist, meets David Blaine, the illusionist.
  12. From beginning to end, it bristles with ironies in classic Eastern European absurdist style.
    • Boston Globe
  13. A bonanza of pop uplift. It wraps the up-from-nothing drama of ''Flashdance'' in the sassy, interracial pep rallying of ''Bring It On'' and the military romance of ''An Officer and a Gentleman.''
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A Tale of Two Sisters reminds that few things are as terrifying as our own imaginations.
  14. A sound piece of profiling that has miles of archival footage of the affable, pop-eyed Langlois enthusing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Doesn't derive its power from the turning wheels of plot suspense but from the simple act of looking and not blinking.
  15. If this blend of community service, innovative teaching, and creative approach to design and construction sounds idealistic, the film’s final scenes deliver enough stress and sweat to show that idealism takes hard work, too.
  16. Manages the right balance of fairy tale and joyous self-discovery. And the Venice locations don't hurt.
    • Boston Globe
  17. It's superb filmmaking, uncluttered and utterly assured. Miike places us in the household of Li, offering up rich, deep colors, with an almost painterly exploration of fields of depth and volume.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Blackthorn is less interested in realism than in elegy, and in bringing this American folk hero in line with the Latin American places and people with whom he ended his days. Given a choice between the legend and the facts, Gil and Barros make up a new legend - and then gild it with light.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Boss of It All finds the common ground between business and acting -- panicky improvisation -- and wonders whether applause or an executive comp package is the greater reward.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Neighboring Sounds unfolds like a casual nightmare in the light of day.
  18. There’s nothing static about Still Walking.’ The presence of three kids sees to that, as does the eloquence of Kore-eda’s framing and compositions.
  19. Related with stolid majesty, with long shots of brooding landscapes and close-ups of opaque faces, the film provides poor preparation for the subversion of genre conventions to follow.
  20. Though at times Siddharth can resemble a well-photographed report on India’s social and economic ills, Mehta subtly employs different styles to sustain the poetry, poignancy, and drama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an angry story, but also a strangely hopeful one, in the sense of new life sprouting through a battlefield. Above all, it's personal and specific, and that IS news we can use.
  21. Isn't just a feel-good movie; it's a feel-good-and-righteous movie. And audiences will forgive its flaws.
  22. Sequels and fun don't often coincide, but this time they do.
    • Boston Globe
  23. He (Hui) does not achieve the surreal grandeur of Hayao Miyazaki’s animated films, but he has enough imagination and talent to engage his audience on its own level.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a worst-case-scenario of bachelor party morning-after, and it is howlingly funny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Could fairly be described as a Robert Altman ensemble movie without the flab, or "Magnolia" with a mean streak and bigger laughs.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What works best in Shrek 2 are the smaller roles, the pile-driving pop-culture jokes, and the moments of weird, early-Mad-magazine comic invention.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s all ridiculous and enjoyable, and at the movie’s center is an actress creatively guessing at what omniscience might feel like.
  24. In Mongolian Ping Pong the point is to look under the majestic vistas and see value in ordinary things -- ping-pong balls included.
  25. The cast helps enliven what could otherwise come off as a treatise. All four actors played these roles during the play's off-Broadway run.
  26. Because Manito is really just an opera without the violins or Viking hats, you probably don't need to have everything spelled out. Its Spanish-English script is secondary to the universal language and timeless drama of family, community, dreams made and dreams dashed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Second verse, same as the first, a little bit shorter and a little less worse.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Smartly filmed (aside from a few distracting editing fripperies), but it's so dazzled by its subject and saddened by his martyrdom that it never moves past the heroic politics of dissent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The one thing that should have been changed but hasn’t is the title, which makes no sense at all in a movie about kung fu.
  27. Shares many things with ''Not One Less'' and ''The Road Home,'' among them a grass-roots sensibility that ultimately puts a premium on hope and simple kindnesses, while acknowledging the seductive power of money and superficial success.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s largely successful, if by nature all over the map.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So there's a hole at the center of "Pete Seeger" that the movie fills with loving remembrances, testimonials, and new interview footage of the singer at his hand-built cabin in upstate New York.
  28. Risks seeming too earnestly therapeutic for its own good. But what makes My First Mister a successful feature directing debut for Lahti is the emotional veracity it summons.
    • Boston Globe
  29. This stuff is clever, in the reflexively satirical, self-aware way that many animated films are. It's not until the dog is accidentally shipped off to New York City that the movie lets you in on an altogether more interesting idea: It doesn't want to be that cool.
  30. It's a snazzy, smartly made, and even hip little scarefest. As a jump-start to Halloween, it's all you could hope for.
    • Boston Globe
  31. Kinetic, fizzy, delivering more bounce to the ounce than anything out there right now, "Rumble in the Bronx" is my kind of mindless fun. [23 Feb 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Andrew Currie's stylish satire falls into the narrower niche of zombie farce, as pioneered by "Shaun of the Dead ," "Slither," Robert Rodriguez's half of "Grindhouse."
  32. Could have been -- and should have been -- richer and more resonant. It's Hollywood Babylon Lite, only TV movie-deep. But at least it's tangy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    How are girls supposed to behave in a culture that tells them they're Disney princesses for the first 12 years and sex toys after that? Girls Rock! has one answer: Strap on a Fender and rage against the machine.
  33. The movie turns what could have been a tedious meta-movie exercise into a sincere dour farce.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So, yes, something needs to be done, and if it takes Sting reuniting the Police in-concert to sing “sending out an SOS’’ on behalf of the plaintiffs (among other worthy causes), so be it.
  34. The film Soderbergh's made is about promiscuous stargazing. And you don't need a brain for that, just two eyes and a mammoth appetite for heavenly bodies.
  35. Solid, balanced period piece that focuses on a specific place and time yet resonates with universal themes.
    • Boston Globe
  36. Frustratingly elusive and seductively louche, Lespert’s “Yves” probes a cryptic myth and a fragile soul, penetrating neither, but conjuring up a taste of Saint Laurent’s suffering, genius and style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For smart kids between the ages of 8 and 12, the movie hits the sweet spot with a satisfying cosmic bang. It's a cross between "A Wrinkle in Time" and a middle-school version of "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
  37. A delightful alternative to most current multiplex fare, which wouldn't recognize a juicy bon mot if it tripped over one in the aisle.
  38. Argo is absurdly suspenseful for both of its hours. I've never been this stressed-out watching people shred documents.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Because it’s a Hollywood movie from a major corporation looking fondly at itself, it concludes that, while art may heal our psychic wounds, craftsmanship and commerce heal them better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For every line of dialogue that's truly, glitteringly acid, though, there are five that are merely clever, and Lee, likable as he is, never really taps into the misery of the teen misfit.
  39. Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey don't simply star in this movie; they tag-team it out of the Freddie Prinze Jr. --Julia Stiles puppy-love ghetto.
  40. A solid, humane, old-fashioned film in the best sense of the term.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Green unquestionably has a rare, intermittent knack for rapture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Absurdly entertaining even after it disappears up its own hindquarters in the last act, and it gives some of our weirder actors ample room to play.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Merely grand old-school fun - a rollicking class reunion that stands as the second best entry in the venerable series.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An almost fetishistic re-creation of a horror-suspense movie from around 1978.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Mostly it’s a footloose tour through the noise and sun of a summer metropolis and an unassumingly wise portrait of a friendship.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The new film isn’t nearly as bleak as Christopher Nolan’s take on Batman (in general, Marvel seems more risk-averse when it comes to fiddling with the crown jewels), but it still creates an action-movie landscape torn between patriotic ideals and harsh post-9/11 realpolitik.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    “Days” is fast, smart, well-acted, and intermittently inspired, and if you don’t know or care who Beast or Blink or Storm are, you can safely skip it.
  41. It’s a surprisingly humorous and humane film — a lyrical little oddity that stands as a welcome return to form.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The actor is magnificent -- ravaged, desperate, aware -- and no more so than in a scene toward the end when Bob's cardsharp cool finally breaks. It's a risky scene, the one note of corn, but Nolte brings it home. Too bad the movie doesn't.
  42. The gusto in the flying bullets, the fleeing lovers, and the flowing music will make you want to hang around until the party is over.
  43. The Signal is like a Romero zombie movie in which the zombies aren't dead, they're just really temperamental. Evil here is technology-born. Maybe our cellphones and satellite dishes are giving us all the crazy.
  44. If this is an unusually sentimental outing for Jia, it’s also characteristically tinged with woe. He’s just added a touch of sweetness to these otherwise sugarless lives.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If you were alive in 1991, the televised images may still stick in your mind and your craw.
  45. A sweetly acted and neatly executed social comedy.
  46. The animals are so magically entertaining to watch here (helped by some gently mischievous narrative assists), the educational treatment is a fun time in its own right.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a bit of a mess but strong stuff nevertheless -- a mournful, often wickedly funny religious satire that suggests what Kafka might have come up with had he been raised Catholic.
  47. Isn't as trippy, scary, handmade-looking, or environmentally aware as some of Miyazaki's pictures. But it shares their dreaminess. Even at its most ingenious, not even Pixar does that.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Proof is proof that you can drain most of the juice out of a play and still have an enjoyable night at the movies.
  48. In addition to being very funny, In a World . . . also makes a case for women to be, well, heard. But in terms of cohesion and narrative, it doesn’t quite come together as a movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's to the "Lethal Weapon" movies what left-hand driving on a country lane is to a freeway chase: pokey, more than a little daft, but with a bloody surprise around every hedge.
  49. Waste Land is just what the film's website says it is: "stirring evidence of the transformative power of art and the alchemy of the human spirit."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s predictable in many places and acerbic in others, sentimental when you expect it and poignant when you don’t. But it stars Lily Tomlin, and that’s all you really need to know.
  50. Another gorgeous and immensely satisfying reminder that there are few better directors than Téchiné when it comes to capturing the vagaries of the heart.
  51. Part of the reason for the comic surehandedness is the obvious chemistry between Shannon, Ferrell, and director Bruce McCulloch.
  52. I've never seen a movie like this. Not on purpose. Daniels isn't saying he's tasteful. He's just saying that his tasteless trash is as deserving of our attention as the tasteful trash we feel like we have to see. The whole thing's a crazy fantasy, like watching a porno dream it can win the Oscar.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Darker, leaner, less expansive , and meaner, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is all business, and it casts a spell utterly unlike the first four films.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If you've got some very small fry on your hands and 75 minutes to kill, this is as bright, colorful, and fuzzy as you're going to get.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Referencing the popular song, the movie's title reminds us that "the fruit of the poor lemon is impossible to eat." That, in a rind, is Riklis's deeply frustrated view of his country's stalemate, but you can only take a metaphor so far before it falters in the face of endless geopolitical complexity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s still enough to chew on to recommend the movie, not least the oddly touching sight of two siblings whose very identities have been altered by surgery.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Vol. II is less focused than “Vol. I” — less funny, too, although there are a few dank laughs — and you feel Von Trier’s inspiration and energy start to flag during the final laps.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The filmmakers bank against their impulse toward melodrama and deliver a reconciliation that is heartbreakingly understated.
  53. Intoxicating fun.
  54. A patient, suspenseful exercise in genre craftsmanship

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