Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,258 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
5,258 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Filmed with a cold, poetic beauty, The Return slowly strips away motivation until it arrives at a place of myth both private and oddly universal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the most enjoyable movies I've seen lately, but it has a biting knowledge of that which history gives and history takes away.
  1. Eloquent and unapologetically cute.
  2. Despite its ultimate nuttiness, has a quiet, consuming power that sneaks up on you and doesn't go away. This is something new and ambitious for Von Trier: a work of compassion.
  3. Ultimately, Bingenheimer seems underwhelmed with himself. The people who know him say, in the movie, that he's a relic. Mayor of the Sunset Strip makes heartbreakingly clear what a glorious relic Bingenheimer is.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is as spare and unvarnished as a wooden temple floating on a lake, but its reflections run deep, and it can ripple your thoughts for months.
  4. Watching it is like being lost in somebody's richly moody campfire story -- it's so good, in fact, that only once it's over do you realize you've been holding your marshmallows too close to the flame.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Turns out to be one of the finer peeks into the creative process of staging a play. Granted, that's a tiny genre, and the film's core audience -- theater majors and the people who love them -- is narrow. The lessons, however, are big.
  5. MC5 is everything a rockumentary should be and usually isn't. Then again, MC5 was everything a rock band should be and usually isn't.
  6. What an amazing presence Gorintin has. Never mind her hunched back and white hair, she's no crone. She makes Eka needy for happiness but susceptible to heartbreak. It's a great performance, full of both joy and the quiet, disappointing parts of being alive that come with knowing change is part of life.
  7. Maddin's movies are easy, too. Point your eyes at the screen; the magic follows.
  8. A definitive, low-tech stomping of every sci-fi clone that has sprung up in the original's wake.
  9. Oasis is that rare miraculous whirlwind romance that moves from attempted rape to reverence without kicking up a lot of dust.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I don't usually make recommendations of this kind, but if you or your kids have gone to a burger joint in the last few weeks, you really do need to see this movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    "No God and no religion can survive ridicule," wrote Mark Twain, but for once the sage of Hannibal was wrong.
  10. [Cuaron]'s a visionary and crafty storyteller who rewards your patience, not with twists in the plot, though the movie has its share, but with pure feeling. Deploying wit, grace, and artistry, he's whisked a kid flick into adolescence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A much better movie than the one it honors.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wants to claim Bukowski (1920-1994) as a 20th-century West Coast Walt Whitman -- a people's poet of modern degradation. Through a selective presentation of his writing and a reverently crass treatment of his life, it makes a funny, often intensely moving case, and you're having such a good time that you're glad to let it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If there's a larger theme in Zatoichi, it's that nobody is quite who he or she seems.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is at its most quietly powerful, though, when telling the story of a group of African-American high school kids who took their discontent to the highest court in the land.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Haneke has become known as a dour modern master of cinematic pain, and in this movie he scrubs civilization down to the root level.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A stunningly well-acted drama for grown-ups.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If you've seen the Beatles documentary "Let It Be," you know what four men who are heartily sick of one another look like, and in 2001, Metallica had been recording twice as long as the Fab Four.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Giants has SO many insistent high points, in fact, that its breathlessness threatens to turn monotonous.
  11. Has a power that doesn't announce itself until it's over: You leave not wanting to give up on life, just resentful of the world we live in.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Unearths the expected footage from the crypt -- including a hilarious live video of the band arguing onstage over what to play next. The anecdotes are pungent and revelatory.
  12. Adults should find its simmering drama at least as compelling as teens will, even if parental figures are only slightly more present here than in a " Peanuts" comic strip.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The director's cut has been getting a much warmer critical reception than the original release, but not necessarily because it's significantly better.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Turns out to be a grade-A B-movie that grounds its thrills in particulars of time, place, and character, so that when the time comes to make the leap into the wholly preposterous, we do so willingly. This is a movie that earns our trust -- and then happily abuses it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Among the most insane mainstream movies ever released.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is startlingly even-handed.
  13. It's hugely entertaining.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As superbly crafted -- as good -- as this movie is, Condon never really owns up to the cloud of pessimism at its center.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Flattens you with concussive detail and the awfulness of war; it plays like "Saving Private Ryan" as remade by a Continental mathematician flipping out on Ecstasy.
  14. From Marber's fiercely polished writing, Nichols wrings every drop of acid, yet it's a show of the director's goodness that a movie fundamentally preoccupied with interpersonal ugliness is allowed to end on a convincing note of beauty.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Elegant, insistent movie -- a great gray filmmaker's finest in years.
  15. What he's (Brooks) come up with is one of the most humane works ever made about the lives of working mothers.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Such smart, whiz-bang fun that you may not realize what it's about until you're safely home.
  16. It's practically a primer on how to rework a literary classic into an impressively restrained movie with something fresh and intelligent to say.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Fully realizes its ambitions as a tale about confronting and navigating life's land mines with humor, tenacity, and hope.
    • Boston Globe
  17. Astounding. It is also bizarre, challenging, and, at times, admirably overreaching. In short, it's the kind of ambitious little film that can leave critics in a swoon and American moviegoers scratching their heads.
    • Boston Globe
  18. The film's most endearing trait is that these people sincerely love movies, and they truly love their own idiosyncrasies. And is that not the greatest love of all?
    • Boston Globe
  19. In the absolutely moving new documentary Watermarks, seven women in their 80s return to the Vienna swimming pool of their youth.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Spare and elegant and harrowing, it's an ode to childhood trust being stretched until it snaps.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remains worth seeing as an achingly nostalgic farewell to youthful idealism, tinged with a kind of loving contempt.
  20. Judy Irving's terrific documentary 'The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill is ostensibly about birds, but only in the way that a game of Scrabble is about tiles.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A delightfully deadpan comedy from Germany, is one of those movies where nothing whatsoever seems to happen until you look closely, at which point everything happens.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A slowly flowering miracle: an epic of normal life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Rambles without apparent purpose, and yet it blooms in emotional impact as it goes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Tarantino may have nicked the title first, but this is the real ''Pulp Fiction," with all the drama and the dead ends that implies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Stylish and only superficially superficial, Happily Ever After plunks us down with three male friends as they dance on the edge of their 40s.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Entertaining and enraging.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With pained gentleness, her film insists we make our homelands within us and take them wherever we go.
  21. A smartly observed, unpretentious, and unconventional comedy of manners -- or more properly, it's a comedy of mannerisms.
  22. A collection of beautifully acted encounters, conversations, symbols, and vignettes woven into an evocative and unforgettably surreal garment.
  23. The film is a tower of literary and cinematic references, tangential yet somehow essential characters, and one fantastic performance after another. It's a simple movie yet is anything but.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The real deal, an often awkward but nonetheless terrifically compelling high-stakes human drama.
  24. An uncommonly intimate portrait, in large part because the filmmaker, Bradley Beesley, is a longtime neighbor, friend, and collaborator.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A broad, foursquare piece of populist filmmaking that happens to be tremendously moving.
  25. A riveting and sobering way to spend a Saturday afternoon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remarkably, ''Me and You" doesn't shock so much as soothe.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There's a delicate balance here between expression and belligerence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film confirms director Audiard as a master of visual mood, in this case one of barely expressed emotional panic.
  26. The director is becoming a master of blending the political and the personal with eloquence and deceptive lightness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Builds slowly and naturally to an unbearable personal crisis.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its unstated cynicism, beauty, and self-pity, Last Days fits the myth of Cobain like a torn pair of jeans.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Aristocrats -- the movie, not the joke -- is a working demonstration of the pleasures of the profane.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An exquisitely filmed, emotionally transfixing epic about a white South African boy's journey to return his pet cheetah to the wild.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Timothy Treadwell was killed, along with his girlfriend, by a rogue bear in October 2003.
  27. If Keane is a downer, it's a stupendously well-conceived one.
  28. Burton, who directed the film with animator Mike Johnson, has rarely been in brisker, friskier form.
  29. The film has the perverse intelligence of Cronenberg's other movies. It's not his best, but it is certainly his most accessible, least stagy work, obeying the laws of chronology and serving up characters whom we recognize as people.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Richly provocative entertainment, as heady as a cocktail party with the Manhattan literati and as vaguely troubling as the morning after.
  30. Anderson is the rare filmmaker who doesn't want to use the actress as an instrument or to exploit her independent-movie cachet. She has freed Moore to be what she hasn't been with many directors: credibly human.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is one cinematic novella that stays with you for quite a while.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A puzzle: a hermetically sealed period piece so intensely relevant to our current state of affairs that it takes your breath away.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even more than "Chicken Run," Were-Rabbit is a tiny plasticine masterpiece.
  31. It infuriated me. It broke my heart. It convinced me that Caro, who's from New Zealand, is a strong, clear-voiced filmmaker
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You're left with the bewilderment and joy on Kane's face as he plays the old songs, and the sense of ghosts just behind his back.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's masterstroke is to avoid interviewing the usual anti-globalist suspects and let solid, hard-working middle Americans speak.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Goblet of Fire is the entry in which Rowling finally took off the gloves.
  32. The film sends you home moved and in a tuneful mood.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brokeback may be too polished for some people, too elegantly dispassionate in its study of choked passion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Tommy Lee Jones makes his feature directing debut here, and the film is as weathered, subtle, and sympathetic as the actor's own face.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The director can work wonders within his celluloid universe, but when the time comes to hand us back to reality, he stumbles. With this movie, that hurts.
  33. Writers Nicholas Stoller and Judd Apatow remake is more devilish, hitting its targets with the reckless glee required for a round of Whac-A-Mole.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Fateless looks man's inhumanity to man square in the eye and pronounces it standard operating procedure, and that may be the greater horror.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An agit-doc of unusual depth. It has a point -- that the primary business of America over the past half-century has been waging war -- and it supports that point with nuance, research, and a willingness to hear the other side of the argument.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's still a wickedly droll put-on. Better yet, beneath the fun lurks a dry and weary sigh at life's refusal to match the tidiness of art.
  34. This is a modest marvel of grace and framing that unfolds with the patience of a cloud and is driven more by wonder than pure emotion. It doesn't have the exuberance of Francois Truffaut 's "Small Change." Instead, it's that movie's antonym, yet just as wondrous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That film remains an electrifying testament to pop music as a communal creative act.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Formally, the movie's a lasting pleasure: Reed's incisive direction; Greene's easy yet weighted dialogue; the farseeing deep-focus photography of Georges Perinal; Vincent Korda's luxuriant sets.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a galling and provocative experience to viewers of any political persuasion, and a reminder to the left of how easily idealism can run amok.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an inside-the-park home run -- a small, lovingly overwritten comic drama about fate, failure, and primal longing. To put it in words a Sox fan would understand, the movie hurts good.
  35. Washington hasn't been this relaxed in years. When he feels like it he can be the most charismatic star in the movies.
  36. The arrival of closing credits feels like a trap door. The film is over, and, suddenly, we have to leave these people. The directors make no guarantee for their futures, but the strength of their filmmaking inspires you to hope for the best.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brick is Bogart goes to high school, in other words, but that thumbnail description doesn't begin to convey the lasting pleasures of Rian Johnson's directorial debut.
  37. The Poe-like atmosphere in Stolen is such a chilling success that when Mashberg says that Gardner would have cracked this case herself, it's impossible to imagine that she isn't out looking for those paintings right now.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is hard going, not least in the sense of powerlessness it leaves in an audience that knows exactly what will happen. And yet you come out feeling that the filmmakers have done the right thing by these people, and by this day.
  38. All the gears, in fact, are shamelessly visible, yet they lock smoothly and resonantly into place. If Akeelah and the Bee is a generic, well-oiled commercial contraption, it is the first to credibly dramatize the plight of a truly gifted, poor black child.

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