Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,193 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Fresh
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
6193 movie reviews
  1. The romantic comedy has never had a star as depressing as Jennifer Aniston. It's not the movies - well, it isn't simply the movies.
  2. There is a mild pleasure in the sight of Jude Law pirouetting with a hacksaw through gangs of extras, but the amusement is notional. I actually don’t find him terribly interesting as a kinetic object.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The real seduction Crudup pulls off is that he makes it seem possible that the character hasn't actually done all of these awful things.
    • Boston Globe
  3. Ultimately undercut by its fictional elements and its flat characters.
  4. New York looks very appealing: uptown, downtown, even the little bit of Brooklyn we see. Think of “Boy” as a Bridges highlight reel and Gotham travelogue, instead of precious coming-of-age story, and it’s not half bad. But it isn’t, so it is.
  5. Unfortunately, director Bill Condon and screenwriter Jeffrey Hatcher are clueless, and come up with an incoherent, implausible, contrived mishmash.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Alas, it aspires to be an epic drama but suffers from an acute identity crisis: It can't decide if it wants to be history, drama, or a cry for peace in the Mideast.
  6. The initial close-up of Thompson - all sourly snaggletoothed and begoggled - is as funny as anything in the original. And just that one quick glimpse would have been perfect.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The results are exactly as patchwork as that sounds, with sequences of rowdy, sacrilegious invention punctuated by long spells of tedium.
  7. When the action sequences move into the sky-diving stuff, they give you a real rush.... Otherwise, though, Point Break is all wet. Too bad, because you always get the sense in a Kathryn Bigelow outing ("Near Dark," "Blue Steel") that she's trying to push a genre into new places. [12 July 1991, p.54]
    • Boston Globe
  8. In Dito Montiel’s treacly, programmatic film, Williams succumbs to a recurring neediness, earnestness, and sentimentality.
  9. It's basically a blaxploitation movie stretched to meaninglessly international proportions that leans on tired Colombian stereotypes. But if Saldana's aiming to be some kind of new Pam Grier, she needs to save more than herself.
  10. Is a man with Asperger’s boyfriend material? It’s difficult to determine how we wind up here, but it’s strange that a movie ostensibly about a man and his lack of social options left me depressed about a woman and hers.
  11. Like an ''Afterschool Special'' with costumes by Gianni Versace, Mad Love looks better than it feels.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Little kids, of course, will swallow it whole without thinking twice.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even the portrayal of the Hasidic community comes to feel like window-dressing, welcome for its exoticism but never truly understood.
  12. Fear is a formulaic thriller that is like "Cape Fear" meets "Fatal Attraction," or "Splendor in the Grass" on crack, but without a hint of those movies' psychological complexities and camp moments. [12 Apr 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You may have to be from Iceland to take dialogue like ''You can't freeze love like a gutted fish'' with a straight face.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Deathtrap is slick enough that you can't disengage from it without missing something. [19 Mar 1982]
    • Boston Globe
  13. It's a lot like a pumpkin spice frappuccino with extra sugar and extra cream. You'll laugh. You'll cry. You'll leave with foam on your nose. So cute. As a friend said on the way out: At least no books were harmed in the making of this movie. And he's right. But that's only because no one really tried.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    RED
    "The Expendables" trotted out the concept this summer, and it was good dumb fun - a nudge-nudge wink-wink '80s movie on steroids. RED is more self-consciously wacky, more stridently in your face, and more disappointing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The loosest, silliest, broadest thing the Coens have yet committed to celluloid, and that includes "Raising Arizona," one of this critic's favorites.
  14. As it escalates to a nasty conclusion, Alpha Dog doesn't have the moral or emotional weight of tragedy. These aren't the psychologically exploded youths of "Rebel Without a Cause," or even "The Outsiders." They're characters in a long, violent, unbleeped episode of MTV's "Cribs."
  15. What’s ironic — and frustrating — is how precipitously the movie itself eventually goes tumbling down the intelligence scale. In the process, Chiwetel Ejiofor is wasted, along with some potent moments from costars Roberts and Nicole Kidman.
  16. The cynics will slap their foreheads, the squeamish will cover their eyes, but the revenge movie fanatics should be nice and satisfied after the whole ordeal.
  17. There are some amusing looks at the elation - and panic - that come with winning big, from the praise-Jesus swooning of Kevin's grandma (underutilized Loretta Devine).
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For the record, Rare Birds doesn't even fly as a birder's special, since Tasseter's Sulfurious Duck is a fictional species. Now, if they'd seen a Eurasian Wigeon, then we'd be talking.
  18. Guy Ritchie made a name for himself with scuzz, but even his shtick has exceeded its sell-by date. Nobel Son goes further, crossing the contortions of "The Usual Suspects" with the shallowness of certain intellectual family melodramas.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The man inside that legend has yet to come into focus 40 years on. Morrison wanted the world and he wanted it now, and he got it. What When You’re Strange can’t admit is that he had no idea what to do next.
  19. It's the men in ''Upside" who speak all the truth.
  20. Supposed to be a cheeky little lark but instead runs a narrow gamut from labored to aimless.
    • Boston Globe
  21. The Client is slick, but not much more than the sum of its surfaces. [20 July 1994, p.23]
    • Boston Globe
  22. The film is slow going with its mix of stilted political discourse and restless village folk just looking to celebrate life and dance. At times, it’s like “Footloose” gone didactic.
  23. The first thing you notice about this so-so adaptation of James Ellroy's novel is the shoddy acting.
  24. The Collection is an honest title. The movie is just a lot of other people's greatest hits.
  25. Kevin James's latest comedy doesn't promise any bing or bang, only boom. Take it at its word.
  26. Those looking for further enlightenment might want to pass on the feel-good cinematic hagiography known as Awake: The Life of Yogananda.
  27. Cairo Time is a kind of bourgeois delusion. It's authentically aggravated but bogusly conceived.
  28. While never heavy-handed about its politics, the film makes no effort to disguise its strong anti-Chinese bias.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sensitively written, nicely shot, expertly acted, and intelligently ambiguous, Nobody Walks still manages to send you out with a shrug.
  29. The enormously appealing Randle holds the screen even when the thinness of Suzan-Lori Parks' script becomes inescapably apparent. There isn't much vigorous narrative pulse, complexity or even faceting of Randle's character, and the arbitrary ending seems both forced and inconclusive. [22 Mar 1996, p.53]
    • Boston Globe
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Race wants so badly to get every last bit of the big picture that it dashes past the little details that actually tell a story. Like an over-trained athlete who pulls a hamstring in the big race, the movie tries to do it all and comes up short.
  30. Numbing story.
  31. Despite a few tangy black comic moments, Lucky Numbers' is bummer theater.
  32. As it stands, The Expendables 2 is lazily satisfied with repeating the first movie's formula, shortcomings and grisly strengths alike.
  33. The dialogue also reflects the material’s stage origins in ways that don’t always translate well.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a cheat, a cash grab, and it makes for 125 dystopian minutes of set-up with no resolution. But come back next November, folks, and we’ll show you the rest! They should have called it “Mockingjay, Part 1 — The Shakedown.” Or “The Hunger Games 3: Rubble Without a Cause.”
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    They’re calling it a movie, but no matter how you squint at it it’s a TV show.
  34. You marvel all the more at Litondo's and Harris's performances, considering how much claptrap Ann Peacock's script requires them to put up with.
  35. The riot of color here brings to mind what the makers of “Ice Age” delivered with “Rio,” which in turn reminds us that these animators certainly aren’t just one-trick talents. Could be time for them to show us some new ones.
  36. Seems embalmed in its own time, an earnest and handsomely crafted museum piece, not an urgent transposition of Miller's moral outrage to the new century.
    • Boston Globe
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Very broad and very silly, it's a doodle of a comedy -- a one-joke idea (fat guy goes luchador) padded out to feature length by Black's willingness to do anything for a laugh.
  37. It's a stupid movie by smart people who aren't smart enough to realize it's stupid.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly all the actors seem to be having a good time, and the action moves so fast that you don't mind when something nuts happens.
  38. Narrated from start to close by an 8-year-old, it often seems like a coloring book on tape.
  39. Alternately shows the elder Bronner as lovable and nutty, sinister and terrifying, victim and victimizer. Ultimately, those disparate elements never coalesce.
  40. The end is a long time coming in Reindeer Games and the dialogue is mostly slush.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Reilly gives it his all, and he’s both very enjoyable and about as scary as a stubbed toe.
  41. Café Society is a romantic comedy where the romance is lackluster and the comedy an afterthought.
  42. After Love is like being stuck at a dinner with an unpleasant couple who won’t stop squabbling.
  43. Full of action, but no soul.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All thing considered, MacGruber’ is a lot better than it should be. That still doesn’t mean it’s all that great.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The only laugh to be had in Total Recall, a ripsnorting sci-fi action extravaganza that starts well and works its way down to average, is in the opening credits, where we learn that the movie's primary production company is called Original Film. Really?
  44. The whole thing ends with an urgent plea to visit the movie's site, which is partially devoted to The Issues, which involve such topics as "overmedication," "overtreatment," and "reimbursement."
  45. In The Bucket List, Nicholson is human-ish. And Freeman is so human.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Benton has laid bare a great author's creaky plotting only to deliver a melodrama with bookish pretensions.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A disjointed patchwork of zany character sketches lacking in coherence and credibility.
  46. If only Miller's writing had some human zest. Nearly everybody here is crunchy, salt-of-the-earth organic, and off in a dreamland.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Viewed en masse, V/H/S can't generate the necessary suspense, and buy-in, to truly get under your skin.
  47. The unworthy new Hollywood remake of Japan's horror phenomenon, ''Ring,'' has packed on a definite article and a whole lot of hooey.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When the film predictably limps across the finish line, you're left with the impression your time would have been better spent sitting in traffic.
    • Boston Globe
  48. It's polished-looking, yet dull.
  49. This is acting that seems more freaked out, more traumatized than it ought to for a movie about an unwanted houseguest.
  50. An hour and a half of cultural and sexual headaches only barely leavened by MacLachlan's performance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What’s nice about this movie, actually, is that you can get a few shameless laughs out of it and then forget you saw it at all.
  51. Herek's brisk pacing and skillful way with the hockey sequences gives The Mighty Ducks an urgency its manipulative copycat soul doesn't really earn. The Mighty Ducks - with its team calculatedly organized along gender as well as multi-cultural lines - is the kind of film kids like, then outgrow. [02 Oct 1992, p.49]
    • Boston Globe
  52. There's also new piety and self-righteousness about parenting. Comedies are nervous to find the real humor and wonder in having a family. It's usually tragedy or nothing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Everything in this good-cop/bad-cop action drama is shrouded in gray and attended by wailing. This isn't a feel-good genre, granted, but does it have to feel this bad?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A structural mess that turns contrived just when it should be hitting home.
  53. It's all been called Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, just like Paul Torday's 2007 novel, and, except for some despicable behavior in the later going, it couldn't be more harmless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Isn't a first-date movie. As a third -date movie, though, it's just about perfect.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a lot of talent here and a lot of enthusiasm; also a lot of influences that haven’t been successfully reprocessed into something convincing or fresh. It’s a mess, but a reasonably charming one.
  54. Its commendable, if juvenile, sense of erogenous adventure is sullied by bland technique, canned suburban punk music, and the fact that all the exploration does amount to maturer characters.
  55. Part of the trouble is casting. This is a movie that needs a great or gonzo performer to give it depth or heft.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A tawdry, predictable hunk of movie headcheese, and I still had a pretty good time with it.
  56. A well-intentioned but self-defeatingly manipulative film that amounts to an impassioned commercial for national health care.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It plants a flag for a new corporate entertainment franchise and it will make international containerships of money, so does it matter that Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is joyless and incoherent? Probably not.
  57. Sadly, this is the sort of movie in which the white Europeans do all the talking and worrying with each other. The Africans, for the most part, are either terrified, cowering, wincing masses or corpses strewn in the dirt.
  58. Snazzy visuals, of which she (Moss) is one, carry The Matrix past its klutzy script.
  59. A sequel seemingly eager to assert that monster mashes are about B-movie chills not "Twilight'' melodrama. Eager to a fault, ultimately.
  60. The biggest problem One for the Money faces is trying to have it both ways: gritty-ethnic inner city vs. girly-girly comic.
  61. Miley may vacillate, but for now her indentured servitude to Disney continues. The image that comes to mind is Princess Leia chained to Jabba the Hutt, but that's probably just me.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Just a limp, jokey family film that wants to have its fairy tale magic and its hip irony, too.
  62. The director, Beeban Kidron, handles the proceedings with an episodic aimlessness on par with Bridget's.
  63. This new goof might have been funnier still if the premise weren't so derivative, so just been there, done that.
  64. One wishes Incantato was made of something other than musty air. Avati provides no real emotional counterweight for all the whimsy and nonsense, and the movie carries neither the force of morality nor the titillation of trashiness.
  65. The closest most people will get to that state of existential freedom is watching actors in a movie about it, and the pleasure usually comes with a price — a reminder that identity, though arbitrary, is also inescapable. In movies like Dante Ariola’s debut feature, Arthur Newman, so, too, are the cliches and platitudes.
  66. Looks and feels like someone else's better-made schlock.
  67. For all the care and craftsmanship that have gone into Hoffa, it's a superficial film. [25 Dec 1992]
    • Boston Globe
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Mostly, though, Being Flynn is memorable for the sight of a once-great actor rousing himself to a performance the movie itself isn't prepared to handle.

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