Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,905 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Look at Me
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
5905 movie reviews
  1. Once again, even reasonably committed fans will need a scorecard to keep track of who's fighting whom. What's the real target audience - i.e. kids - supposed to make of it all?
  2. The new remake of Arthur is a thin copy of the 1981 original. But it has a few things going for it.
  3. This is a manic hour and a half. It's full of pushy, grabby, assertive, borderline obnoxious characters, not all of whom went to Harvard.
  4. Whether this movie works for you largely depends on whether you're willing to work for it. To which I say: Bring your gym clothes.
  5. At its best, the movie is provocative, sleekly assured, and a legit showcase for its intriguingly deep ensemble
  6. Everybody in the movie is so tightly wound that Walters seems a model of actorly limberness. She cuts through the movie with speed and mannish, zany wit.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It is spectacularly average. Neither an inspired reimagining nor a painful dud,
  7. Under a different set of circumstances - in a different society - the development might have flourished. But The Pruitt-Igoe Myth is a documentary, not fantasy.
  8. The trouble with Grumpy Old Men is the patronizing attitude -- ageism, really -- that takes a too-broad approach to their geriatric world and renders it plastic. It is too cute and sanitized to allow its performers much in the way of opportunity.
    • Boston Globe
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So it is with St. Vincent, which might be Murray’s “Gran Torino” if you squint at it from one angle, or “Old Meatballs” if you come at it from another.
  9. Rodriguez does a fair job of keeping the zaniness coming: Vergara’s machine gun bra, Gibson delivering exposition in a “Star Wars” prop, bad guys offed by helicopter blades in dementedly creative ways. It’s enough that you’ll hope Rodriguez makes good on that new faux trailer — for “Machete Kills Again . . . in Space.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Rum Diary has been retroactively Hunter S. Thompson-ized. And not for the better.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is one schlockfest that may be enjoyed more by casual viewers than by hard-core fans, since writer-director Paul W.S. Anderson breaks with the established mythology of both properties whenever he feels like it. Like it matters.
  10. An intermittently arresting, mostly standard action entry that deals death noisily more than cleverly - a lot like the original.
  11. Things bottom out when Zoe not only hooks up with another lover (there is not an ounce of body fat in this movie), but also misses her son’s soccer game. And up until then we were all having a good time.
  12. Just a bunch of spotty sketches slapped together that will satisfy no one except the diehards.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Taking wobbly aim at our country's complicated love affair with guns, the movie's the very definition of a cheap shot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A watchable disappointment. Sumptuous to look at, tastefully dull, and ultimately rather silly.
  13. Lively, if overlong, documentary.
  14. The movie tries to do for forearms what the loosely similar science-fiction romance "The Adjustment Bureau'' attempted for men's hats: make them chic.
  15. The early dilemma in "Rise of the Silver Surfer " is this: Save the world or marry Jessica Alba . Your conscience says, "Save the world." But the Maxim reader in you knows better.
  16. Rendition is a reminder that, in the wrong hands, political outrage can be a slog.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Heavy metal, alt-pop, southern rock, orchestral swells, wailing Middle Eastern tunes all vie for our attention, but none of this noise drowns out the sound of good intentions twisting themselves into an impotent knot.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even older kids will understand that Pixar does it so much better, not because of their computers but because of an intelligent attention to script and character and craft. If the people running Disney don't understand that much anymore, maybe they should turn out the lights and go home.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film doesn't embarrass itself or dishonor its predecessor, which is something.
  17. Ultimately, this film is only scary if you're afraid of artfully self-conscious, grainy cinematography.
    • Boston Globe
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The only reason to see Leaving - and it's not a bad reason at all - is for the sight of Kristin Scott Thomas in a rare happy mood.
  18. "Wolverine" feels enslaved to its many masters - Marvel Comics, Hollywood, and the young men who devour their products - never sidestepping the déjà vu it inspires.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film itself is painless, strained, occasionally amusing, and utterly disposable — just another studio buddy comedy/action movie that forgot where it put the script.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Still as moth-eaten as a Bengal tiger rug on the floor of a London men's club.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This story of how corporate interests collude against the common good is surely worthy. But you might ask if the facts of the case might have made a better documentary, not a drama.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A good-natured but terminally mild British mockumentary.
  19. Despite moments of black comedy and some memorable images, this “debut’’ doesn’t offer a lot to love.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Stands to delight small children while probably causing their parents' heads to cave in.
  20. The thematic stuff, while well-intentioned, is also clunky, and ultimately beside the point. Action, obviously, is what you’re after.
  21. Keep your big-budget horror movie expectations locked away in a separate crawl space, because this grainy feature debut from writer-director Ti West demands that you buy into the silliness, and the cheese.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Here the foundation has been miscast. That's M-I-S-C-A-S-T.
  22. The moviemaking is proficient, if unremarkable. I like the idea of an Elizabethan action movie apparently more than I enjoy watching one.
  23. There are many things that Better Than Sex is better than, although sex is not among them. It is better than a root canal, an IRS audit, or a rained-out ballgame.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an enjoyably demented meta-finale, the rivals showing what they could do if they ever bothered to actually do it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    iIf you can ignore a ridiculously overbearing soundtrack - a big if - the film's a pleasant bauble. Still, those coming in cold may be forgiven for thinking they've wandered into "Atonement" remade as a farce.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film eventually collapses under the weight of its no-budget arrogance, but it goes some interesting places beforehand.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A muscular Australian B-movie down to the thin characters and boilerplate dialogue.
  24. Does not sink to the bathos of Roberto Benigni’s Oscar-winning film (“Life Is Beautiful”), but it does reduce a period of irredeemable horror to the heroics of a single person.
  25. The strength of Jacob's Ladder is that we never know what the next scene will be. But that's also its weakness. We don't feel involved with the characters here. We just feel jerked around. Jacob's Ladder, finally, is bummer theater. [2 Nov 1990, p.73]
    • Boston Globe
  26. In the end, it's hard to see a real reason for the movie's existence. We already have Muppets.
  27. It’s fun in stretches, but also busily forced.
  28. The message is clear almost immediately: charity not vanity.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of those sticky dramas.
  29. A righteous but wrongheaded thriller, chokes on its well-meant outrage and leaves a moth-eaten plot and handful of nonsense characters on its way to a dopey finish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Not without its charms. But it never rises to its clever what-if concept.
    • Boston Globe
  30. Unlike other films that successfully explore abstractions, such as Wong Kar Wai’s “In the Mood for Love” or the memoiristic collages of Terence Davies, it doesn’t seem to have much going on beneath the drab surface.
  31. Achingly slow, at times bleak and, in the end, frustratingly and regrettably, rather pointless.
  32. Belle has the pace and sumptuous cinematography of a Merchant and Ivory production, but none of their memorable characters, subtle performances, or literate dialogue.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A textbook case of filmmakers who can't make up their minds about their characters; it's a failure of nerve disguised as dramatic ambiguity.
  33. In James Marsh's The King, the usually wonderful Gael Garcia Bernal is all wrong for the role of Elvis Valderez.
  34. The movie works best when it finds a balance between flatly familiar and over-aggressively unexpected.
  35. After a sensuous introductory act, The Reader descends into a series of dismaying contradictions regarding the moral toxins of the Holocaust - which still pollute postwar Germany.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s weird-stupid more than good-stupid.
  36. Ironically, the phoniness that iconic teen romantic Holden Caulfield despised pervades Jim Sadwith’s Coming through the Rye, a semi-autobiographical tale of hero worship and literary integrity.
  37. Perry shelves his crowd-pleasing Madea character and aspires for the impossible mix of 1950s social melodrama, gospel-inflected public service announcement, soap opera, R&B video, girl-centric sitcom on the CW, and any episode of "Good Times," featuring Janet Jackson's oft-affronted Penny. Were Perry a visual director or a logical, patient screenwriter, that hybrid would count as a feat of singular ambition. Instead, it seems like the product of an abbreviated attention span.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sarah Silverman is far and away the best part of I Smile Back, a strained entry in the Mad Housewife genre.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    12
    The new film's not only almost double the length of the original, it's four times as ambitious - a sprawling, surrealist, ultimately disturbing portrait of a society lurching uncertainly toward democracy. What's really on trial in this movie? Just the Russian soul.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's meta-fey title alone is an example of why some people adore Anderson and why he drives others absolutely crazy.
  38. Intermittently engaging but inescapably overextended.
    • Boston Globe
  39. Redmon's film is a welcome reminder that everything comes from somewhere and responsible people should at least pause to examine the label. For one thing, that's how bigger and better documentaries get made.
  40. The script boasts some tart TV-insider humor, but the film has not a trace of humanity or empathy.
  41. The appeal of Bedtime Stories belongs entirely to Sandler. As a comedian, he doesn't have to stoop to a kid's level. He's usually already there.
  42. The problem with the new movie is the same as with the previous one. Vardalos has this idea that she's a marm. And while it's true that she personifies her movies, I don't quite buy her librarian mode.
  43. Choppy, cheesy historical war epic really has only a couple of things going for it, and its biggest asset remains the heroic popular legend that inspired its making.
  44. At its best, it delves into the murky areas of memory, childhood trauma, and family conflict. But it forgoes such troubling issues for mumbo jumbo and glowing-eyed wraiths.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In a better movie -- a much better movie -- LaBeouf might make the same sort of impact Dustin Hoffman did in ''The Graduate.'' But the kid's young. There are movies to come.
  45. Unfortunately, as the story builds toward tenderness, it’s undercut with slathering tongues and bare-chested stud-muffin shots.
  46. It’s another brightly rendered effort, but, as the title indicates, a lot of the real creativity seems to have been used up the first time around.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You've seen New in Town before, and you've seen it done better. Still, it's a sweet-hearted bit of anemia, pleasant and obvious, and there are a few honest laughs to it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Well-mounted and expertly played, Winter in Wartime is a class act that lacks only focus and originality to raise it above the ordinary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is crisply shot, expertly paced, solidly acted, and it gets a goose when Bill Pullman shows up in the late innings as a good-old-boy lawyer. (By contrast, it’s never convincingly explained what stake the union official played by Elias Koteas has in the drama.) All that’s missing is a reason.
  47. It seems more a geek show than a slab of marketing wizardry.
  48. The movie is as inconsequentially pleasant as its star, and far nicer than the title lets on, too.
  49. A flavorless family-friendly action-adventure that doubles as memory exploitation. It has nothing to do with either the Mickey Mouse broom sequence of the same name from 1940's "Fantasia'' or the 213-year-old Goethe poem that inspired it.
  50. Don't Say a Word can be thought of as a case of Dial B for Boring.
    • Boston Globe
  51. Cronenberg's direction is technically impressive, but he's better suited to stories based on surges of feeling between killers, not lovers. This M. Butterfly never takes wing. [08 Oct 1993]
    • Boston Globe
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So appallingly slipshod in all the usual departments is this sequel to the engaging martial-arts comedy Western ''Shanghai Noon'' that you're tempted to cite its makers for contempt.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    W.E., her second effort after 2008's "Filth and Wisdom,'' tries awfully hard. In the end it tries our patience.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like everything in this humorless new genre, "Chronicles" comes with its own snap-together mythology.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The production design is swank, the score impassioned. We should be riveted. Instead, you may feel you’ve seen this movie before, and, in a sense, you have: Woman in Gold plays remarkably like 2013’s “Philomena” with a change of cast and a different historical outrage.
  52. Blame the unsexy subject matter if you want, but blame the uninspired casting first.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Haute Cuisine proves the limits of cinema: It’s a movie that needs Taste-o-Vision.
  53. Coming and going through the wall's checkpoints is a tiresome and undignified process that makes US airport security look like a cocktail reception.
  54. Not horrifying enough.
  55. 300
    There's a stale, synthetic airlessness about the movie. Imagine a large cast trapped in a series of spectacular screensavers. It could be ancient Greece. It could be somebody's hard drive.
  56. The guys in Metallica are here to remind us that there’s a band behind the rage rock. The IMAX 3-D release Metallica Through the Never is all about reasserting their relevance, loudly.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an actor's film, all right -- peppered with rich supporting performances but unconvincing in the telling.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    How can you tell the target age for Superhero Movie is exactly 13 1/2 years? Because most of the jokes are Internet-related.
  57. Has there been a more tormented or intense study of the ambivalence of revenge than Penn’s performance in Eastwood’s “Mystic River” (2003)? Penn might not agree with Eastwood’s politics, but when it comes to probing a killer’s soul he couldn’t find a better model.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Everything about this curio is claustrophobic.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Unknown is punchy and entertaining. Maybe not the sort of thing you'd want to spend $10 plus a mortgage for popcorn on, but a nifty surprise on DVD several months from now -- or on pay-cable on-demand right now.
  58. Watching the uncertain and disappointing new apartheid documentary Amandla! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony'' is like going to the lecture of an impassioned but really disorganized professor.
  59. Fails to drum up much excitement.
  60. This is a corny tale, told with both generous helpings of deli-sliced cheese and a brief stretch of chilling tumultuousness.

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