Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,842 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Army of Shadows
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
5842 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    People Like Us is neither optimal nor prime.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Turns out to be rather less than the sum of its headlines.
  1. In both senses of the word, American Psycho wastes its women.
    • Boston Globe
  2. Unabashed Fidel worship.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Disappointing not for what it is but what it could have been.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Deeply, proudly average..."Mean Girls" it's not; a plastic butter knife has more edge. But sometimes it's nice to know your kids won't cut their fingers.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Divergent is almost good enough to make you forget what a cynical exercise it is on every possible level. The original 2011 young adult novel by Veronica Roth — reasonably engrossing, thoroughly disposable — reads exactly like what it is: an ambitious young author’s attempt to re-write “The Hunger Games” without bringing the lawyers down on her head.
  3. The duo provide a bit of wit and warmth amid the contrived subplots and the self-satisfied moralism.
  4. This is a flavorless adaptation of Richard and Florence Atwater's 73-year-old children's book.
  5. Seems so preoccupied with genuflection that it never achieves its subject's heart-pounding immediacy.
  6. Best, probably, to appreciate the movie for what Slattery, Hoffman, and the cast do most effectively: craft a pervasive atmosphere of tired people trudging through tired circumstances that only seem to grow more, well, tiring.
  7. He concocts a climactic war that flattens downtown Chicago. Bay is such a little boy's director. You know he picked that city because it's the one with the best rock-'em-sock-'em street names. Wacker! Wabash!
  8. Fusco's script undercuts whatever freshness it may have brought to its view of Billy the Kid with a steady stream of howlers, most of which involve Kiefer Sutherland, as the sensitive member of the gang. [12 Aug 1988, p.24]
    • Boston Globe
  9. Exhausting and seemingly endless.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    "I'll be back," the man said, and he kept the promise, but I'm not sure we wanted him back like this.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Director/co-writer Ariel Vromen has made a grimly passable crime drama in the sub-“GoodFellas”/“Sopranos” vein, and if you’re looking for something to order up on a slow Saturday night, it’ll do.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's fodder for tweener girls with indiscriminate Nick TV addictions, but there's just enough wit on display to make you realize it could have been worse.
  10. Brüno is what "Borat’" was too well-done to be: a publicity stunt about publicity stunts.
  11. Though Mira shows skill at evoking mood and building tension despite the constrained circumstances of the premise, the narrative quickly and embarrassingly breaks down.
  12. You feel embarrassed for Streep and Jones (Streep especially) because of the situations, often sexual, they're put in. They're definitely not mailing in their performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    An Officer and a Gentleman has so many echoes that it never finds its own voice. [29 Jul 1982]
    • Boston Globe
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    To truly appreciate Wagner & Me, a BBC documentary getting a spotty theatrical release in this country, you have to cherish the music of Richard Wagner with the same quivering intensity as host Stephen Fry.
  13. Mastering subtlety, you won't be surprised to hear, remains on Moore’s to-do list.
  14. The trouble with Quantum of Solace is that the frills are a mess, too. Even the customary opening title sequence, with its writhing silhouettes and screechy theme song by Jack White and Alicia Keys, is a cheesy throwback to the Roger Moore era: Ladies and gentlemen, the Quantum of Solace dancers!
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A pleasant puff-pastry throwback to Sandra Dee movies, ''Bye Bye Birdie,'' and other pre-Beatles effluvia.
  15. Hopped up on standard action riffs, most of the film feels like hand-me-downs purchased from the John Woo outlet.
  16. There is one bright spot. Ellie Kendrick plays Dolly's silly, breathlessly romantic little sister, Kitty.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie has style but increasingly little sense.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The immediate problem with making a movie based on Potter's life is that it doesn't seem to have been very interesting.
  17. The movie is so dependant on its source material that it fails to put Carter, Thompson, Penn, and Christy to better use.
  18. Eckhart, who gets more rugged by the picture, certainly works hard to bring the audience along. But he's a nervous wreck for nothing. This movie isn't talking to us, it's talking to other serial killer movies.
  19. The platitudes in this gratuitously sentimental movie are taken a lot more seriously than the people.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At one point in ''Praise,'' Godard mentions that the Bois de Boulogne, the Parisian park, is all that's left of the French forests from the time of the Roman conquest. In Praise of Love, glowing like an ember, is all that's left of genius.
  20. It’s a movie content to stay within the show’s comfort zone, changing things up mainly with flashier, 3-D visuals, a couple of which are dazzlers, and a theme that doesn’t connect in any notable way.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The premise of Agent Cody Banks is more than a little bizarre.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The latest installment in the venerable sci-fi action franchise turns out to be a straight-up war film, grim and muscular and thundering and joyless. It's the color of cement, and it weighs as much, too.
  21. It’s not a good sign when the first few minutes of a movie about singing, dancing, rapping, video-camera-wielding teenagers reminds you of a certain grimy horror franchise.
  22. There are laughs here and there, and Graham and Klein aren't nearly as grating as what surrounds them. But there's no getting around the fact that far from seeming a labor of love, Say It Isn't So seems merely labored.
    • Boston Globe
  23. It makes you wonder if the series' animators, who took time out for "Rio" just before this, aren't so secretly yearning to sail different creative waters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Hard, gleaming images and an oblique storytelling style come to Wang the way the bike comes to Jian -- secondhand.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is decent and heartfelt, and it eventually settles into some sharp diamond action, but the small-town homilies are dropped like an anvil. If you thought 1993's "Rudy" was too spare and unsentimental, Final Season is for you.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The final act of Dark Matter is grim but unconvincing, and the shortfall leaves an ugly, exploitive taste in your mouth.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The unforced cleverness of the opening scenes gives way to lazy plotting, awkwardly staged musical numbers, and car chases. By the end, the movie resembles just another formulaic, family-friendly piece of product, one the kids will enjoy and you’ll endure as it goes in the DVD player for the 40th time.
  24. Neither hot nor square, it's as simple and earnest as any after-school special and as cameo-laden as any rap video.
  25. Silly little thriller.
  26. The ending steals actionably from "The Blair Witch Project," the movie that helped spawn these first-person chillers.
  27. Predictable and not terribly clever, but among the slim pickings of movies geared to the pre-school and grade-school set, it could be much worse.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Basically, if the first “300” was a pep-talk from Coach on how to lose with dignity, Rise of an Empire is an inspirational speech on the value of teamwork.
  28. But despite the vibrancy of its images and the exquisiteness of its craftsmanship, Jefferson in Paris doesn't often light a fire under its material. [07 Apr 1995]
    • Boston Globe
  29. Humorless, pretentious black-and-white tone poem about a very young Abe Lincoln.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As a credible love story, though, the film never leaves the runway. If you're a fan of these actors, you may want to look up Jet Lag when it comes out on video, or catch it on an Air France flight while flirting with the passenger in the next seat.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What this dystopia doesn't do is shock. In truth, Code 46 traffics in notions of speculative social fiction that are so familiar by now as to feel disconcertingly normal.
  30. Pretty clearly determined to deliver the antidote to Stallone's movie, the filmmakers take their cues from Christopher Nolan's Batman filmscape, dropping Dredd into a fictional concrete sprawl (actually South Africa) that's relentlessly grounded, visually and dramatically. In a generic way, the environment works.
  31. Cronenberg hasn't so much filmed Naked Lunch as tamed it, turned it into entertainment, with oozy rubber bugs, big and little, that look left over from David Lynch's movie of "Dune," or the intergalactic dive from "Star Wars." [10 Jan 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  32. If there's nothing here for romantics, there's even less for gourmands. Nettelbeck fails to produce a good food metaphor, let alone an impressive, palate-aching preparation montage
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Youth recedes, the body decays, life is a compromised thing: These are truths. But they're not fresh truths, and Moss's riverdogs are hardly the first to have discovered them.
  33. If we learn nothing else about Krasinski as a filmmaker, it’s that he thinks more is more.
  34. Date Night manages to live down to its store-brand title.
  35. Some entertaining inventiveness, before nagging limitations finally drag it down.
  36. Though offering some chilling twists on the usual conventions, employing wit and restraint where otherwise the filmmakers might have relied on the contents of an abattoir, Aftershock is ultimately predictable in its litany of who lives and who dies, and doesn’t try to be too ironic or self-reflexive about it.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Overstays its welcome.
  37. It's a heart-warmer, a well-meaning movie that sets out to wring a modern message (and preferably some tears) from a famous but largely forgotten moment in history.
  38. It begins promisingly.... But the film has no center, succumbs to drift, and gets away from Hackford. [03 Mar 1984]
    • Boston Globe
  39. The laughless outtakes for ''Armed and Fabulous" helpfully remind us that it could have been worse.
  40. The effects are so showy, and so relentless, that they call attention pretty quickly to the fact that there is not much else to Cats and Dogs.
  41. Unfortunately, the filmmakers seem to have forgotten that comedy is a requisite feature in a comedy.
    • Boston Globe
  42. There is no central drama, no surprise, no tension in his comedy. The ads for Along Came Polly make it look so upbeat and simple that you're convinced it must be hiding something, like death or a disease. But the truth is there in the advertising: nothing happens.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a well-made film that will seem revelatory to moviegoers unfamiliar with the huge, worldwide gaming culture. They’re going to be pretty hard to find, however.
  43. So much of Virgin is bunk masquerading as sexual politics.
  44. Dramatically speaking, The Caveman's Valentine is a dead end.
    • Boston Globe
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Trishna should move the soul and engage the tear-ducts, yet it passes by as distant as it is lovely. And the blame must fall on the movie's star, Freida Pinto.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The issue is contentious, messy, prone to wishful thinking. Some see a corporate plot to privatize schools. Others see a last chance to save them. Won't Back Down is on the latter side, obviously, and it has the boilerplate urgency of a TV movie that has been blessed with a high-end cast.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s one of those multi-character morality plays — think “American Beauty” meets “Crash” — and it will play especially well to freaked-out parents, even as it distances itself from them by acknowledging that the kids (most of them, anyway) are all right.
  45. Doesn't deliver on a lot of fronts. But then again it gives us full-on Faithfull, who manages to bare herself completely without ever actually getting undressed.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is a curious hash: warmly funny in the comic scenes and shamelessly sentimental during the sad bits, of which there are many.
  46. The movie doesn't hang together as a thriller, and the characters don't hang together as interesting people.
  47. You get the sense that the cheap thrill of cheating is like putting a Band-Aid on a broken bone. The movie feels just as inadequate emotionally and psychologically. There's a lot of outward behavior but no inner life.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a lot of intelligence in Transcendence. Ironically, almost all of it feels artificial.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie runs an hour and a half. Lowry’s book can be read in less than a day. It still gives anyone — child or adult — more than enough to wrestle with.
  48. As for the performances, only homely Giovana has heart and depth. The two boys lack chemistry, even in chemistry class, due in part to the trite dialogue, or at least as it is translated in subtitles.
  49. It's a surprise that Stallone is as funny as he is playing a hit man paired with a cop in Bullet to the Head. He's man-cave witty in a way that his "Expendables" movies have strived for but haven't really managed.
  50. If Crossing Over is less self-congratulatory than "Crash" about confronting its designated problem, it's just as inept at dramatizing the complex ways that problem unites and divides us. Here every cause is something you can wear around your neck.
  51. Fascinating but frustrating.
  52. Bride Flight is pretty predictable once the basic situation gets established.
  53. When it comes to writing and directing movies, though, Murdoch has some work to do. “Girl” meanders narratively and with random chronology, some scenes playing like tepid music videos, others as unhelpful efforts at exposition, some as strained drama, and some as the genuine, funny, spontaneous interactions of gifted young people.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Buried somewhere within the bipolar extravaganza that is The Invasion is an awfully good movie that got away.
  54. Is it being a spoilsport to suggest that the Hubble’s original 2-D images are a lot more stupendous than all the IMAX 3-D hurly-burly?
  55. After all the mesmerizingly illicit buildup, the film’s willful lack of a payoff is almost as strange as one of those essays.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Where Mia and the Migoo triumphs is in the art department alone, with rich brown charcoal outlines, majestic pastel washes that give depth to the landscapes, and riotous colors that are more vivid than the story line.
  56. The biggest problem with the documentary, besides the overexposure of its namesake, is length.
  57. While Hartley, who made this movie on a shoestring budget, has avant on his mind, he's not nuanced enough to quite pull it off. [03 Aug 1990]
    • Boston Globe
  58. Takes a dedicated and true snapshot of African-American life. But so little of its presentation is memorable. This is a haircut movie that redefines ''fade.''
  59. American Violet feels less like life and unreasonably more like the movies.
  60. An original thriller about a home-invasion robbery gone wrong. To clarify, that would be “wrong” as in “not according to plan” – but also “wrong” as in “so dementedly repugnant, it just isn’t right.”
  61. A high-impact, high-powered mess that raises the bar for over-the-topness.
    • Boston Globe
  62. Though it features a plucky female protagonist, Annabelle still possesses the same medieval attitude toward women as “The Conjuring,” reducing the gender to the extremes of self-sacrificing mother and malevolent toy.
  63. The characters are intended to be slightly stupid, but the writing isn’t necessarily smarter.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It would have been nice if someone had included a script, too.
  64. Hartley's loquacity and arguable pretentiousness are stemmed by his sense of play. Even when they run afoul, his movies still have the conviction of their fun. No Such Thing barely has any convictions at all.
  65. Birbiglia, who's from Shrewsbury, has done some wonderful things with awkwardness. I'm sad to report that Sleepwalk With Me isn't one of them.

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