Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,401 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Day Night Day Night
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
5,401 movie reviews
  1. This movie catalogs a wealth of human ugliness. It’s even been made to look ugly, presumably to underscore the horror movie that is Precious’s life.
  2. The entire movie is pitched at a scream. But the screaming is more Janis Joplin, Axl Rose, or Mary J. Blige than Jamie Lee Curtis. All the tears I shed were hard-earned. So were all the laughing and clapping and eye-covering. In each case, it was involuntary.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A life is not plot; plot is not life. By scrupulously sticking not just to the accuracies of Turner’s life as we know them but to the tiniest of details, the chipped mugs on kitchen tables, the pantaloons on a passing merchant, the spray of storm surf across the bow of a ship, Leigh wants us to truly see the world Turner moved through. Only by seeing that world can we see how he saw and painted it.
  3. Oliver Stone's Born on the Fourth of July is a knockout, a huge angry howl of movie that uses a crippled Vietnam veteran's disability as metaphor for a country's paralysis. [5 Jan 1990, p.67]
    • Boston Globe
  4. Never has a film taken such relish in between-the-wars malice as Gosford Park.
  5. This is a brilliantly structured hall of mirrors that wraps Catholicism and the movie industry into a tasty film noir.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is insanely good, and the best time I've had at the movies in ages.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Fueled by Meryl Streep's performance in the title role, energized by Nora Ephron and Alice Arlen's script and tempered by Mike Nichols' understated direction, Silkwood is a brilliant movie that puts art above polemics, and the facts above speculation. [14 Dec 1983]
    • Boston Globe
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The New World is something I don't think I've ever seen before on a movie screen: an epic lyrical dialectic. Self-indulgent, gorgeous, maddening, grueling, ultimately transcendent, it's a Terrence Malick movie all the way, and possibly the director's most sustained work since 1972's "Badlands."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Alison Klayman's documentary is one of the most engagingly powerful movies of the year almost completely on the strength of Ai's rumpled charisma and the confusion it creates in the bureaucratic mindset of the Chinese Communist Party.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Blistering and brilliant work.
  6. Spacey is diamond-brilliant in a role that plays as if custom-made for him.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All you really need to enjoy "Triplets" is a taste for the weird and the wonderful.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Dardennes achieve lyricism without seeming to try.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There's humor in "Le Quattro Volte," and then a deep, abiding sadness, and beyond that a larger, more graceful comedy that extends to the horizons.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    20 Feet From Stardom may possibly be the happiest time you’ll have at the movies all summer, but it comes with a heavy load of frustration. The joy...is in the sound of women singing their big, beautiful hearts out. The pain comes from the anonymity they’ve spent their lives working under and fighting against.
  7. We're in a golden age of comedy, and one of the reasons is Margaret Cho.
    • Boston Globe
  8. Astonishing.
  9. A sweet screenful of quirky chaos.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s a funny, dark, increasingly razor-sharp inquiry into the metaphysics of modern fame — how the dream of “being seen” and thus validated on some primal level can completely unhinge the average schmo.
  10. One of the year's most winning performances, Logue's Dex will grow on you as he stumbles toward emotional fullness.
  11. Stillman has become a master at escalating the laughter by waiting an extra beat and then understating something devastatingly funny, as when someone looks Chris Eigeman's club manager, Des, in the eye and says, "I consider you a person of integrity - except, you know, in the matter of women."
  12. Vincent and Theo is one of the great Robert Altman films... It's Altman's most structurally conventional film, although it's filled with such trademarks as overlapping conversations. It's also his most personal and deeply felt. [16 Nov 1990, p.81]
    • Boston Globe
  13. Nobody ever placed brilliance in the service of silliness quite the way the Python gang did. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is stuffed with both.
    • Boston Globe
  14. The movie they've assembled is in the vein of 1973's "Wattstax," but it's much more than a concert documentary. It's a jubilant, civic-minded lollapalooza.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Birdman finds Iñárritu in the mood for play, and with a mighty cast that fields every pitch he throws.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The arrival of Raúl Ruiz’s final work, Night Across the Street, brings the total to four, an elegant, clear-eyed bridge game of artists playing their last trump cards.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At Sundance, Whiplash quickly picked up the nickname “Full Metal Juilliard” on the basis of scenes in which Andrew, plucked from a late-night practice session to be the orchestra’s drummer, is raked over the coals by his new mentor. Horrifying as they are, these sequences are dazzling exercises in total humiliation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is one of the most unforgiving ground-level documentaries about the music business ever made -- the six-string equivalent of "Hoop Dreams."
  15. It's one of the great movies on the vicissitudes of love, commitment, and attraction.

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