Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,428 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
5,428 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tootsie, the story of a man who liberates himself by masquerading as a woman, is the funniest, most revealing comedy since "Annie Hall." [17 Dec 1982]
    • Boston Globe
  1. The atmosphere is hypo-stylized, vividly generic and worse than real, like a doomy Frederick Wiseman documentary.
  2. It's one of the great sister movies and one of the great performance movies. [26 Jan 1996]
    • Boston Globe
  3. Nothing as big and strange and right as The Master should feel as effortless as it does. That's not the same as saying that it's light. It's actually heavy. It weighs more than any American film from this or last year. It's the sort of movie that young men aspiring to write the Great American Novel never actually write.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Exhilaratingly slow, which for many will simply mean SLOW... Those who can downshift appropriately, however, stand to be enraptured.
  4. There Will Be Blood" is anti-state of the art. It's the work of an analog filmmaker railing against an increasingly digitized world. In that sense, the movie is idiosyncratic, too: vintage visionary stuff.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Eloquent, bloody, and daringly simple.
  5. Quiet, powerful, contemplative, respectful of stillness, Eureka is the first film this year in which there is obvious greatness.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Movies like The Kids Are All Right -- beautifully written, impeccably played, funny and randy and true -- don't come along very often.
  6. This is a movie from the past that's also eerily of a piece with the film culture of now and tomorrow.
  7. As demonstrated in his previous film, a plangent snapshot of subsistence called "Waiting for Happiness," Sissako is a poet, and the filmmaking in this new picture is stuff of a deserving laureate.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Fly is that rare species of movie - a remake that far surpasses the original and, quite frankly, all expectations. [15 Aug 1986]
    • Boston Globe
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Gorgeously stoic art film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its unhurried fashion, Sugar can take its place with the best baseball movies. Where most focus on the grand slam, this one's about the life that surrounds the game and everything that comes after.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    To see Au Hasard Balthazar is to understand the limits of religious literalism in movies -- the limits, even, of movies themselves. Bresson pares everything away until all that's left are the things we do and the hole left by the things we could have done but didn't.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In short, This Is Not a Film is the world within an apartment, and it is quietly devastating.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A film noir? A backstage musical? A whodunit? A comedy? In truth, it's all of the above -- plus a kinky love story, an absorbing melodrama, and a mordantly jaded snapshot of postwar Paris -- and all of them are wonderful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a unique trip that flirts with hokeyness at the surface but that grows more compelling, awe-inspiring, and tragic the deeper you go.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Boyhood is a stunt, an epic, a home video, and a benediction. It reminds us of what movies could be and — far more important — what life actually is.
  8. Butler's approach is subtle: His documentary allows the story to unfold elegantly, without embellishment, and it is more powerful for that restraint.
  9. The sly and subtle Minus Man is a wicked little sidewinder of a black comedy.
  10. Hartley's spare dialogue cuts right to the characters' psyches; his terse, laconic style accentuates the everyday horror. [20 Sept 1991]
    • Boston Globe
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Her
    It is a love story. Also a profoundly metaphysical meditation on what it means to be human. Also one of the more touchingly relevant movies to the ways we actually live and may soon live. Oh, and the year’s best film, or at least the one that may stick with you until its story line comes true.
  11. With its beautifully crafted starburst of colors and themes spanning its requisite Victorian gravity, A Little Princess is a beguiling little supernova of a movie I can't imagine anyone not loving. [19 May 1995, p.64]
    • Boston Globe
  12. Pan's Labyrinth is a transcendent work of art.
  13. In a crisply restored print, it's as joyous as ever. We loved them - yeah, yeah, yeah. Now we can love them all over again.
    • Boston Globe
  14. But then Being John Malkovich is a brilliant juggling act, too, brilliantly brought off.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    About the search for common ground, among journalists on all sides of the conflict and, through them, between viewers in America and the Arab world. Only within that common ground, Noujaim believes, can something like a workable, personal truth be found.
  15. Few, if any, films this year will approach, let alone equal, Autumn Tale in its subtle sparkle.
  16. [The novel's] themes have never not been fresh and they gleam here under the sympathetic and enlivening touch of Armstrong and her cast, who move through the events with sunny assurance and complete immersion in character. [21 Dec 1994]
    • Boston Globe

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