Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,428 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
5,428 movie reviews
  1. Henry David Thoreau plays an enigmatic role in Shane Carruth’s hypnotic thriller — an oxymoronic term to describe a film that is truly sui generis.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remains worth seeing as an achingly nostalgic farewell to youthful idealism, tinged with a kind of loving contempt.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Moore's conception of the character is compelling. She rivets us. She's assisted by the superb performances Redford has elicited from her co- stars, Sutherland and Timothy Hutton, who plays Conrad, the guilt-ridden surviving brother of the dead boy. [26 Sep 1980]
    • Boston Globe
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Whenever a band plays in “Persian Cats,’’ the director treats us to a fast, vibrant montage of Iranian faces and street scenes -- as if to say, look, this is who we REALLY are.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brokeback may be too polished for some people, too elegantly dispassionate in its study of choked passion.
  2. With Jackson leading the way, Shaft has style, punch, and street cred. It's a hot cool update.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With a tranquil fearlessness, it goes beyond the death of memory, to see what might be found in the unexplored country beyond. The answer is both frightening and comforting: More love. Unspecified love. Universal love.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A history lesson for a country and a people forced to forget at gunpoint.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If there's a larger theme in Zatoichi, it's that nobody is quite who he or she seems.
  3. It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's masterstroke is to avoid interviewing the usual anti-globalist suspects and let solid, hard-working middle Americans speak.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A film of great ingenuity and imagination, full of suggestive power, and it deserves to be seen.
  4. Warm, smart, and funny!
    • Boston Globe
  5. An upsetting landmark. Don't take the children.
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Queen of Versailles is still worthwhile, not because it questions all-American entitlement but because it prompts us to think hard about what, exactly, we believe we're entitled to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An entertainment to be not just seen but absorbed on a molecular level; it's as close to a full-body experience as we'll get until they invent the holo-suits. Cameron aims for sheer wonderment, and he delivers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A work of quiet, crystalline empathy, I’ll See You in My Dreams is notable for reasons that nearly overshadow its modest yet indisputable charms. It’s a drama about the kind of people invisible to the movies and much of our culture — senior citizens in the early evening of their lives — and it grants its characters individuality in ways that are almost wholly free of cliché.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It is a joy for audiences seeking entertainment, an ingenious work of craft for those paying close attention, and a wallop of feeling that’s still too rare coming from a cartoon.
  6. Everything about Chop Shop is modest - the movie's scale, the characters' ambitions. Another director might have tried to nudge the film's grim detours toward tragedy. And that might have worked, too. But Bahrani is a refreshingly deceptive director in that sense.
  7. Adults should find its simmering drama at least as compelling as teens will, even if parental figures are only slightly more present here than in a " Peanuts" comic strip.
  8. Here the Japanese senses of honor and of shame are particularly entangled. Later in the film, Lu mounts an Imperial Army parade through the Nanking ruins. It's something to see.
  9. It's the best drug-busting movie since ''The French Connection.''
  10. Like the children’s films of Iranian directors Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi, Bad Hair explores such social pathology, in part, in the guise of a kids’ movie. But it also takes on the intensity of more pointed films such as “Bicycle Thieves” (1948) and even Hector Babenco’s sensationalistic “Pixote” (1981).
  11. It sounds like the old unstoppable-force-meets-immovable-object trick. Ramin Bahrani's Goodbye Solo has the trappings of such a story, but, mercifully, none of the follow-through.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Think of it as "Glee" without music. Without a net, too.
  12. Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
  13. It is haunting in its literal and symbolic meanings, which is the powerful, lingering effect of Yellow Asphalt.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The great pleasure of le Carré-land — for some, it’s the frustration — is that one’s own moral certainties are quickly stood on their head.
  14. Funny, gritty, filled with surprising stabs of feeling, Parenthood is a stretch for Ron Howard, its director. This new adult comedy has the generosity of "Cocoon" and "Splash," but it takes Howard into deeper, darker, messier territory. [2 Aug 1989, p.57]
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The only question his movie doesn't ask is "What do you want your next car to run on?" That's up to you.

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