Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Oslo, August 31st
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
5885 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rockwell is a hoot as Frankie, but during the stretches when he's not on screen, the air goes out of the film.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's just another happily idiotic Will Ferrell comedy, ably directed by Jay Roach ("Meet the Parents," "Dinner for Schmucks") and tossing its bawdy jokes at the side of the barn.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie has a pleasing skinned-knee innocence that makes you wish everything else about it wasn't so shoddy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Of the two French films opening in the Boston area today - "Beloved" is the other - Little White Lies is the less ambitious, more watchable, and ultimately more annoying.
  1. More to the point, the title doubles as accusation. Progress is dangerous and requires survival tactics, just as a hurricane or avalanche does.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In this TV reality show masquerading as a movie documentary, Brian Herzlinger is a creepy voyeur, a run-of-the-mill loser who obsesses about living the celebrity high life but lacks the talent to pull it off.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Molly Hartley is dull at worst and surprisingly spooky at best.
  2. But that ending is a whopper all the same: a heartless blast of tragedy, exploitation, amusement, and general flagrance.
  3. It's too fragmented and diffuse to ever bring its parts together in any really satisfying manner.
  4. It's a movie so late in noticing a shift in American male grooming that for a documentary on the subject to work, Spurlock would either have to pitch it to our grandparents (or be a grandparent) or trace the arc of the shift and unpack it.
  5. Before long, it runs out of steam, playing like the pilot for a TV sitcom called "Baby Knows Best." [13 Oct 1989, p.37]
    • Boston Globe
  6. The problem with this adaptation of Lawrence Block’s detective yarn isn’t that it casts Neeson in a role we’re seeing him play again and again. It’s that no one else in the movie makes a character feel nearly as broken-in and fully inhabited as he does.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sweet, splattery bit of in-jokery; if it’s not actually a good movie, on some level you have to admire the chutzpah of a film set in 1850s Ireland but shot on Staten Island.
  7. A more convincing star could make this a degree more tolerable, although in Cyrus’s defense not much more.
  8. Doing nothing special, Freeman manages to make the picture seem wiser, funnier, and more eloquent than it is.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's the sort of thing you'll either find enchanting or an excellent reason to reach for the Scotch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This Equalizer is a brooding, brutal origin tale, one that starts well but steadily caves into genre clichés. It’s a B-movie sheep in A-movie clothing, acceptable meathead mayhem as long as you know what you’re paying for.
  9. The movie seems terrified of true psychological complexity or perversity. It's less a family tragedy than a lousy country dirge.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ultimately, the problem with An American Carol is the problem with far too much political discourse in this country, left or right: It highlights the worst excesses of the opposition for the sole purpose of discrediting the vast middle.
  10. Some of this vigilante-fantasy misbehavior is wickedly funny.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Blandly noisy and inoffensively average.
  11. Runs out of fresh ideas about how to make its heroine look nuts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I know the opening credits for a James Bond movie are supposed to be silly, but the start of Spectre achieves almost orgasmic levels of kitsch.
  12. Writer-director Nic Bettauer can't decide whether to play Duck for tears or laughs.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Never gets horribly bad, but can't sustain its moments of inspiration either.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    To press the point, there is absolutely no need for a fourth Pirates of the Caribbean.
  13. Barber, who directed the neglected, unabashedly satisfying vigilante thriller “Harry Brown” knows how to get the blood pumping and stoke an audience’s craving for righteousness, vengeance, and vicarious sadism. What he lacks is the woman’s touch, if by that one means nuance, ambiguity, and empathy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is back-to-basics stuff, which turns out to be not such a bad idea.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As documentaries go, it's an able introduction that doesn't make its subject nearly as relevant to our current discontents as it could.
  14. Hand it to Amanda Seyfried - she seems to have a knack for underplaying unstable characters in a way that lets their nuttiness creep right up on you.

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