Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,155 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Vincent & Theo
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
6155 movie reviews
  1. Directed by splat-pack director Alexandre Aja (“Piranha 3D”) with uncharacteristic but still gruesome restraint, adapted from what seems a very busy novel by Joe Hill, Horns resembles an awkward collaboration between Nathaniel Hawthorne, Stephen King, and Rob Zombie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie has a problem, too: Spall is likable, Kazan is adorable, Driver is amusing enough as the blowhard best friend, and Radcliffe as Wallace is . . . a passive-aggressive lump.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s entertaining enough if you turn your brain off.
  2. Daredevil the movie strains itself trying to catch up with Sam Raimi's web-slinging megasmash. It's a faceless copy, right down to the muscle-rock groaning on the soundtrack.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a line between enjoyably stupid and stupid-stupid, and Nerve sails over it right around the halfway mark.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Here is where All Is By My Side runs into trouble. The real Etchingham has said, forcibly, that this didn’t happen — not the beating nor her subsequent attempted suicide, shown in the film.
  3. The current, much better Canadian movie "How She Move" has a more realistic grip on the racial politics of hip-hop-dance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A mostly lumbering, occasionally rousing epic that walks a bizarre line between historical fact and Hollywood wishful thinking.
  4. Mosteller might be the movie's real discovery. He twists his lisp and slurry speech around the dialogue in a way that exudes far less attitude than the kids.
  5. The best thing about the film is the way it allows Richard Pryor to rise above the demeaning buffoon roles he's been playing for the last few years and finally play a character with dignity and style. [17 Nov 1989, p.89]
    • Boston Globe
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Somewhere in Time is a glossy, flossy and intermittently interesting piece of kitsch which, with more sensitive craftsmanship, could have been one of the more dazzling screen romances of the year. It's too bad that it's held down by its more overt commercial impulses. [7 Oct 1980, p.1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Old story, new beat: That sums up Feel the Noise, an acceptable if resolutely average low-budget drama set in the New York/Puerto Rican musical melting pot known as reggaeton.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Sitter pushes the envelope with such sloppy gusto that you have to give in occasionally, and its comic timing finds its rhythm about every fifth joke.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Does have the enclosed, slightly overheated feel of a family theatrical.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Shallow and proud of it, an antic cartoon that lacks the comic inspiration to go the distance.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like many of us who cherish the safe harbor of old movies, Rose and Cary mourn the fact that they don't make 'em like they used to. If they'd paused to ponder why not, they might have a better movie.
  6. So where does that leave this coming-of-age comedy written and directed by Jan Ole Gerster? Somewhere in the middle, lukewarm and inoffensive, trying hard not to be plebeian or pretentious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Leave it to the French to take the joy back out of sex. The high-minded erotic drama Exterminating Angels has heat but little light; it speaks of pleasure while treating it as a dirty word. The cast huffs and puffs but the exercise, sadly, remains academic.
  7. A mixed bag. With such a brief running time, there are not enough high points to recommend the five shorts that make up the film.
    • Boston Globe
  8. Gordon made similar lurches all over the map in his previous exercise in grotesquerie, "Edmond," which was based on a David Mamet play and starred William H. Macy as, of all things, a racist misogynist on a grisly bender. Stuck could have used some of that outrageousness.
  9. The mix of mawkishness and polemic is naive. Children, though, will probably leave with a lot of good questions. A better movie would leave them with more.
  10. Greer and Lyonne play off each other well; the combination of readily corruptible innocence and reluctantly innocent corruption elevate the material. Their badinage and interactions suggest a genuine sisterly relationship, with a long history of resentments, betrayals, and co-dependence. Too bad the filmmakers try too hard at making you laugh, and not hard enough at making you feel.
  11. Uses lots of stock footage and takes looks back at America's big transitional period as though the era came in a can.
  12. An example of a film that begins with a provocative idea and then runs itself into the ground with clumsy structuring.
    • Boston Globe
  13. The Adventures of Ford Fairlane is a nonstop gross-out contest of absolutely no socially redeeming value at all, unless you happen to value laughter. Ford Fairlane is funny garbage. [11 Jul 1990, p.41]
    • Boston Globe
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Bra Boys uses reenactments to make the case that Jai acted in self-defense, but the tactic comes off cheap and unconvincing. Worse, the director never bothers to talk to anyone outside the tight coterie of insiders. Why should he when his brothers' freedom is at stake?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The chief culprits are Townsend's TV-movie characterizations and a very muddled message.
  14. Entertainment so generically gentle, it doesn’t compare to last year’s similarly themed, tonally looser “Trolls.”
  15. A story that builds toward Po training an army of his panda brethren fails to deliver exponentially greater fun.
  16. His (Green) new gross-out comedy is crude and stupid, but just as often rudely funny. It doesn't so much push the envelope as shred it.
    • Boston Globe

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