Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,576 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Oslo, August 31st
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5576 movie reviews
  1. All the gears, in fact, are shamelessly visible, yet they lock smoothly and resonantly into place. If Akeelah and the Bee is a generic, well-oiled commercial contraption, it is the first to credibly dramatize the plight of a truly gifted, poor black child.
  2. Barbara Kopple and Cecilia Peck's film is a fascinating look at the intersection of commerce, celebrity, and controversy.
  3. To say the least, the film is awkward, like a piece of badly assembled Ikea furniture. Still, editor Bernadine Colish weaves together all that C-SPAN footage into a disturbing procedural indictment. Legislators use the same language - often the president's - to justify the rush to war. The repetition is comical until it's scary: They're parroting.
  4. This is the best thing Mortensen's ever done. His slow, paunchy, hairy Freud has a cavalier authority and a capacity for drollery. He's also seductively wise in a way that makes both Fassbender and Knightley, as very good as they are, also seem uncharacteristically callow.
  5. [Cuaron]'s a visionary and crafty storyteller who rewards your patience, not with twists in the plot, though the movie has its share, but with pure feeling. Deploying wit, grace, and artistry, he's whisked a kid flick into adolescence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The seductively gripping cinematic stunt that calls itself Locke bears a slight resemblance to the recent “All Is Lost.”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In a way, Howard has made a philosophical drama about the way men move through the world. It’s just a really, really fast drama.
  6. Tamblyn's surprisingly measured performance commands attention.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Unearths the expected footage from the crypt -- including a hilarious live video of the band arguing onstage over what to play next. The anecdotes are pungent and revelatory.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Fateless looks man's inhumanity to man square in the eye and pronounces it standard operating procedure, and that may be the greater horror.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Nolan brings his Batman trilogy to a close with a majestic, almost completely satisfying crash. Everything feels epic about the film: the characters, the effects, the emotional stakes - even the missteps (and there are more than a few).
  7. Has extraordinary depth and insight about the limitations and follies of human beings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Venus is rollickingly funny at times -- but there's an undercurrent of extraordinarily clear-eyed sadness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The team of producer Ismail Merchant and director James Ivory has created another classy film of a classic novel with their stunning adaptation of E.M. Forster's Maurice. [24 Sep 1987]
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Somers Town, is a trifle: A short black-and-white lark with sharp edges and a soft center. It has its raptures, though, and then some. A disarmingly slight tale of adolescent friendship, Somers Town is one of those rare movies that seems to discover itself as you watch it.
  8. As Apichatpong erases, once again, the barriers between the celestial and terrestrial, he also does away with the cordons between film genres - this is sci-firomancefamilyreligiousthrillercomedyporn. No video service has a section for that. The only suitable shelf is the one in your soul.
  9. Bernstein communicates Ungerer’s manic spirit and his irrepressible creativity by punctuating the conventions of talking-head interviews and archival footage with animated snippets of Ungerer’s thousands of illustrations.
  10. The Mauritanian-born Abderrahmane Sissako, one of the great filmmakers of sub-Saharan Africa, does not need to resort to propaganda in Timbuktu to denounce fanaticism. He has poetry. With subtlety, irony, and even humor, he gradually prepares the viewer for the horror to come.
  11. The film's central drama is not between the former secretary and the filmmaker. It's between McNamara and history.
  12. Ultimately, Bingenheimer seems underwhelmed with himself. The people who know him say, in the movie, that he's a relic. Mayor of the Sunset Strip makes heartbreakingly clear what a glorious relic Bingenheimer is.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What’s under the film’s surface is intriguing enough, but it’s the surface itself that holds you in a dark trance. A portrait of alienation filmed from the alien’s point of view — or is it just a woman’s? — the movie’s a cinematic Rubik’s Cube that snaps together surprisingly easily, yet whose larger meanings remain tantalizingly out of reach.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As superbly crafted -- as good -- as this movie is, Condon never really owns up to the cloud of pessimism at its center.
  13. Ullmann's film is an achievement of heart and consequence, as full of integrity as Bergman, yet demonstrating more mercy.
    • Boston Globe
  14. Proves acutely subtle. But its question of what we forgive art in the face of atrocity and immorality is one for the ages.
  15. There's nothing paltry about its poultry.
    • Boston Globe
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A transporting cinematic experience with a churl at its center, and how you feel about the movie may depend on how you feel about the churl.
  16. The Wonders evokes many other films, but is utterly unique. It is like being privy to a marvelous story that Rohrwacher is telling herself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Big
    Big is an example of what has become rare in Hollywood -- a self-confident comedy that transforms an old gimmick into a new, vivid experience. It's as funny for the kids as it is for adults and, for that reason alone, can't be recommended too highly. [3 Jun 1988, p.33]
    • Boston Globe
  17. Despite his neuroses, VanDyke displays self-awareness and humility, and a charisma that ranges from the goofiness of Owen Wilson to the grandiosity of his hero, Lawrence of Arabia.
  18. A bleak road movie that often ambles. But its many moments of poetic grace make this haunting and harrowing journey a rewarding one.

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