Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Zero Dark Thirty
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
5885 movie reviews
  1. The Turin Horse is in a very gray black and white. It looks the same way it feels: bleak, pure, forbidding, transfixing. Watching it, frankly, can be a bit of an ordeal. There's hardly anything in The Turin Horse you would describe as entertaining, but there is a very great deal that's beautiful and absorbing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Violence in Green Room is just bad. Unfortunately for its heroes and for us all, it’s also sometimes inevitable.
  2. It's brilliantly precise in its detailing, stylishly jagged and sensual by turns, and utterly unpredictable.
  3. The film's disturbing images are presented matter-of-factly, which makes them more powerful, not less.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Scorsese and his team of Grade A talents are working on an operatic scale here, and like many operas, this is long, overwrought, sprawling, and more than frequently brilliant. It also hits just enough discordant notes to keep it from greatness.
  4. It's sweeping yet intimate, stately yet impassioned, stylized yet immediate.
    • Boston Globe
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Notes on a Scandal is a nice mug of poisoned eggnog for the holiday season -- a movie so smart and entertaining you almost don't feel its chill sicken your bones.
  5. A parody of and winking homage to the history of Thai melodrama, Wisit Sasanatieng's uproarious filmmaking debut exuberantly combines pop and kitsch with a wholesome belief in the thrills of bad art.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a foodie's delight, obviously, and best seen either on a full stomach or with restaurant reservations immediately following.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's an unexpected end-of-summer tonic: a trash guilty pleasure with a healthy (if really violent) sense of outrage. It's also Rodriguez's freest movie yet, and possibly his best.
  6. Sokurov’s elegy for Europe — and for art — is eloquent, sorrowful, and challenging.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As taut and suspenseful as any fictional mystery.
  7. A collection of beautifully acted encounters, conversations, symbols, and vignettes woven into an evocative and unforgettably surreal garment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Neruda is a dream of Chile, of what it was and might have been, brought to the screen by a master dreamer.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Sensual, funny, and moving film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sicko is Moore's best, most focused movie to date -- much more persuasive than the enraged and self-righteous "Fahrenheit 9/11."
  8. Much of the plot is outrageously, if also cheerfully, implausible — except that, in a context of talking fish, what qualifies as implausible? The important thing is how everything rings true emotionally.
  9. It's not the mega-tech or the shootouts that make Ghost in the Shell memorable, but the ghostliness of it, its ability to convince us that Kusangai - no less than Rutger Hauer's strangely noble android in "Blade Runner" - has a human's ability to conceptualize her own mortality. Nor does arid intellectual speculation make Ghost in the Shell what it is. [1 Mar 1996, p.29]
    • Boston Globe
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its attention to detail and awareness of betrayals both political and human, "Tinker Tailor'' is a movie for grown-ups.
  10. Comes on as both a rebuke to male vanity and a chic metaphor for midlife panic.
  11. What an amazing presence Gorintin has. Never mind her hunched back and white hair, she's no crone. She makes Eka needy for happiness but susceptible to heartbreak. It's a great performance, full of both joy and the quiet, disappointing parts of being alive that come with knowing change is part of life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Entertaining and enraging.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A tart, smart, closely observed satire of the television industry.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    De Palma is a cinematic sampler that makes you want to gorge on the whole unholy buffet.
  12. An ambitious mix of politics, religion, art, and human drama.
  13. All the gears, in fact, are shamelessly visible, yet they lock smoothly and resonantly into place. If Akeelah and the Bee is a generic, well-oiled commercial contraption, it is the first to credibly dramatize the plight of a truly gifted, poor black child.
  14. Barbara Kopple and Cecilia Peck's film is a fascinating look at the intersection of commerce, celebrity, and controversy.
  15. To say the least, the film is awkward, like a piece of badly assembled Ikea furniture. Still, editor Bernadine Colish weaves together all that C-SPAN footage into a disturbing procedural indictment. Legislators use the same language - often the president's - to justify the rush to war. The repetition is comical until it's scary: They're parroting.
  16. This is the best thing Mortensen's ever done. His slow, paunchy, hairy Freud has a cavalier authority and a capacity for drollery. He's also seductively wise in a way that makes both Fassbender and Knightley, as very good as they are, also seem uncharacteristically callow.
  17. [Cuaron]'s a visionary and crafty storyteller who rewards your patience, not with twists in the plot, though the movie has its share, but with pure feeling. Deploying wit, grace, and artistry, he's whisked a kid flick into adolescence.

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