Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,303 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
5,303 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With a minimum of melodrama and a fluid camera style that weaves restlessly in and out of the throng, Something in the Air is attentive to the users and the used in this generation of supposed equals. There’s no anger to the film, though, and what sometimes feels like passivity is really just the fond, unromantic gaze of an artist carefully considering his younger self.
  1. As funny as it is sharp.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Deeper, darker currents move through Momma's Man, eddying around fears of letting go on both sides of the generational divide.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    May not be the best movie ever made about the perils of family life, but it is among the most ruthlessly comic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Does a terrific job of evoking the electric magic of an extraordinary era.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Quiet, observant, and intensely moving whenever Heiskanen is on screen, and it has a valedictory sweep that feels like a summing up.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Terrifically compelling and, more than that, unexpectedly moving.
  2. Her face is as much a part of her comedic form as her observations are. It's an amazing slapstick instrument, creating a scrapbook of living mug shots.
  3. Kurt and Mark's trip to those hot springs is a figurative return to Eden. Anyone who's had a disillusioning reunion with a moony old friend knows what Mark discovers: They're too old to stay that innocent. None of this hit me until after the movie ended. But it hit me hard: You can't go home again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower finds an unexpectedly moving freshness in the old clichés by remaining attentive to the nuances of what happens within and between unhappy teenagers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A haunting experience, one that requires patience (and then some) but that offers spiritual, philosophical, and aesthetic rewards beyond the immediate power of words to describe.
  4. The arrival of closing credits feels like a trap door. The film is over, and, suddenly, we have to leave these people. The directors make no guarantee for their futures, but the strength of their filmmaking inspires you to hope for the best.
  5. If the second hour or so isn't as strong as the first, it's because the filmmaking fails to rise to the injustice that's befallen its subjects since their exoneration. It can't, really.
  6. Wendy Carroll is a character we rarely see in movies anymore, a woman left alone with her thoughts. That a moviegoer would care what she's thinking testifies to the power in Williams's brand of solitude.
  7. In ''Trials,'' Hitchens is almost endearing, stalking Kissinger from one event to the next like a bleary-eyed Michael Moore.
  8. Sad, funny, brilliant.
    • Boston Globe
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Haneke has become known as a dour modern master of cinematic pain, and in this movie he scrubs civilization down to the root level.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Seems calculated to shock, but what’s most disquieting about Nymph()maniac is how funny, tender, thoughtful, and truthful it is, even as it pushes into genuinely seamy aspects of onscreen sexuality. Obnoxious he may be, but von Trier knows how to burrow into our ids.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Gosling may be the soul of Half Nelson, but Epps is the film's heart.
  9. Natural Born Killers is going to be a love-it or hate-it film. But it's an important film. Pumped up, jumped up, yet asking the right questions, [it] is more than an attention-grabber. It's a grenade pitched into the media tent. [26 Aug 1994, p.51]
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The question remains: Why would Herzog want to dramatize what he has already captured as nonfiction? To better control the material, I think, and to bring it in line with his own obsessions.
  10. 'Titanic'' was a case of a cheeseball story riding terrific effects. The Perfect Storm is in every important way deeper.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s tone is hushed, restrained; emotional damage is crammed way back where no one can see it yet defines everything through a murky prism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is at its most quietly powerful, though, when telling the story of a group of African-American high school kids who took their discontent to the highest court in the land.
  11. It's much closer to a European film in sensibility than to one of Hollywood's factory products.
  12. Cooper gives the performance just the right lunacy and doubt.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The subject is the privileged state of childhood itself - how we're all lucky to have had it and how it so easily floats away from our grasp.
  13. In its dark, relentless, devastatingly ironic way, The Pledge is an exhilarating movie, partly because it isn't afraid to be genuinely challenging.
  14. A rarity among modern movies: a coming-of-age tale without cliche or sentimentality. Bolstered by a luminous lead performance from Lauren Ambrose.
  15. If you thought ''Moulin Rouge,'' or, for that matter, ''Tommy,'' was trippy, Hedwig, with its glorious convergence of material and performer, will show you what you've been missing.
    • Boston Globe

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