Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,571 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 No End in Sight
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
5571 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the most enjoyable movies I've seen lately, but it has a biting knowledge of that which history gives and history takes away.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s all as entertaining as it is outlandish.
  1. Even when its wires are showing, the movie's soul is always evident.
  2. Oasis is that rare miraculous whirlwind romance that moves from attempted rape to reverence without kicking up a lot of dust.
  3. We have lots of terminology for what happens when two male stars appear to have the platonic hots for each other. The genre is called bromance. The feelings are bromantic. The orientation is bromosexuality. What Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum have in 21 Jump Street scrambles, transcends, and explodes all of that.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Tommy Lee Jones makes his feature directing debut here, and the film is as weathered, subtle, and sympathetic as the actor's own face.
  4. Alonso sustains an atmosphere of otherworldly immanence in a vivid setting, with a style involving long takes with characters posed as if in tableaux vivants.
  5. Awash in strangeness, a poem that details what it's like to be 13 at the end of a millennium.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Maddin's Winnipeg is a rich, funky, funny stew of fears and desires, of mangled civic chronology mashed up with hothouse private emotions. This is a secret history, and it's a wonder.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are the serious Coen brothers movies, like “No Country for Old Men” and, um, “A Serious Man,” and there are the not-so-serious ones. Hail, Caesar! is the opposite of their serious ones, and it is delightful.
  6. An uncommonly intimate portrait, in large part because the filmmaker, Bradley Beesley, is a longtime neighbor, friend, and collaborator.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Richly provocative entertainment, as heady as a cocktail party with the Manhattan literati and as vaguely troubling as the morning after.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This War/Dance is among the most affecting films I've seen all year; it cuts to the core of being and gives individual faces to sorrow and to hope.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's still a wickedly droll put-on. Better yet, beneath the fun lurks a dry and weary sigh at life's refusal to match the tidiness of art.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Both actors are among the best, most intuitively creative we have, and whatever transpires offscreen in Crowe’s case, onscreen they only serve their characters. Neither man showboats here, and it’s a thrill to watch them work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's spookily touching to see this massed group of former rock gods gathered to honor one of their fallen. Bald spots and graying shags predominate; the giant velvet lapels of 1969 have given way to sensible sport coats; the granny glasses are for real.
  7. All this desperation and squalor reeks of authenticity. Many of the actors are from the streets themselves, and such locations as a crash pad rented out by a dotty lady could never be dreamed up by a Hollywood screenwriter.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Amy
    Mitch Winehouse has disavowed this movie and his portrayal in it, but it’s hard to argue with the scene where he shows up on St. Lucia, where Amy has fled from the hounds of the global media, with a reality-show camera crew of his own.
  8. As a flawed but lovably lionhearted woman, Barrymore triumphantly comes of age as an actress.
    • Boston Globe
  9. A slick, twisty, top-of-the-line crime thriller with gorgeously sensual textures and a screenful of wickedly faceted performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a wrenching, ennobling essay on teamwork and the hard struggle to change one's life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In many ways, Son of Rambow plays like a pint-size, even cheekier version of the recent Michel Gondry film "Be Kind Rewind." Both are stories about people making movies not because it's their job but because doing so brings a vast sense of play into their lives.
  10. Hollywood filmmaking at its best, brimming over with feeling, texture, spirit, and several kinds of keenness that transmute experience into big pop myth.
    • Boston Globe
  11. The word bears repeating, so everyone from Andrew Weil to Stephen Hawking to Mikhail Gorbachev is here to speak the still-inconvenient truth. The filmmaking, however, is far more relentless than in that Oscar-winning Al Gore slide show.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A straight-up drama and thus the only film in "The Trilogy" not forced into a genre straitjacket -- suspense thriller ("On the Run") or farce ("An Amazing Couple") -- "Life" is also the finest of the three. This isn't a coincidence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Low-budget, sure of itself, and creepy as hell, the film actually scores quite low on the gore meter. Like the best nightmares, though, it proves nearly impossible to shake.
  12. Haunting, powerfully acted, penetratingly written, it's about people coming home -- and not coming home -- to their marriages.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    "No God and no religion can survive ridicule," wrote Mark Twain, but for once the sage of Hannibal was wrong.
  13. As powerful as it is as social commentary, Gett triumphs most as an examination of human relationships.
  14. Roughly translated, Touchez pas au Grisbi means ''don't touch the loot.'' But in literal terms, this film version of Albert Simonin's blockbuster really couldn't care less who ends up with the cash.

Top Trailers