Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,368 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5,368 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Subtle, it’s not. But it is effective. The days when Al Gore could mobilize a nation with wonky charm and a PowerPoint presentation are over. As Marc Morano says, “keep it short, keep it simple, keep it funny.”
  1. The bleakness of Rosetta will not be for all, but it's one of the best films of the year.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Very few people will take in this spectacle of a society amusing itself to death, of “reality games” and the vapid media hysteria that surrounds them, and not draw a parallel to our own televised bread and circuses. At its best, “Catching Fire” is a blockbuster that bites the culture that made it.
  2. Dennis's film attempts something few documentaries have: to inhabit the psyche of its subject.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A cruelly precise, often bleakly comic account of upper-middle-class privilege coming unglued when the cosmos throws a curveball.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the first time, though, his (Mortensen)performance seemed so much bigger than the film surrounding it. That he manages the feat with so few wasted gestures puts him in line with the greats.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Flattens you with concussive detail and the awfulness of war; it plays like "Saving Private Ryan" as remade by a Continental mathematician flipping out on Ecstasy.
  3. Despite the seeming inevitability of tragedy and despair, In Bloom remains true to its title. Though political and personal upheaval threatens to overwhelm them, Eka and Natia’s clarity and courage resist the ignorance, injustice, and rage all around.
  4. A 2009 film only now getting theatrical distribution in the United States, it is perhaps Farhadi’s richest, most complex and ambitious.
  5. The film quickly becomes one of the most powerful, carefully researched investigations of the moral-legal side effects of current American military campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq. It's terrifying in a way that sneaks up on you.
  6. Bernal, with his sweet man-boy looks, makes Padre Amaro's portrait of corruption all the more flabbergasting in its irony.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    More movies should be so funny and perceptive, with writing this sharp and acting this believable.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a gentle epic, based on a 10th-century Japanese folk tale, that uses pencils, ink, and impressionistic washes of color to convey a glowing visual otherworld, one that stands in contrast both to Takahata’s earlier work and the hard-edged lines and bright tones of much anime.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The attitude of many “UP” fans hovers between voyeurism and concern, between cherishing these people as distant friends and as extensions of ourselves. They’re canaries in the coal mine of human existence.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Turns out to be a grade-A B-movie that grounds its thrills in particulars of time, place, and character, so that when the time comes to make the leap into the wholly preposterous, we do so willingly. This is a movie that earns our trust -- and then happily abuses it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What on earth is The Trip, besides hugely enjoyable?
  7. I have not seen the film “Fifty Shades of Grey” but I doubt that it evokes the mystery, wit, and eroticism that Peter Strickland’s sumptuously claustrophobic fable of women in love does. All without nudity, bad dialogue, or the requisite wooden acting.
  8. The beauty of Let the Right One In resides in the way the horror remains grounded in a tragic kind of love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With a minimum of melodrama and a fluid camera style that weaves restlessly in and out of the throng, Something in the Air is attentive to the users and the used in this generation of supposed equals. There’s no anger to the film, though, and what sometimes feels like passivity is really just the fond, unromantic gaze of an artist carefully considering his younger self.
  9. As funny as it is sharp.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Deeper, darker currents move through Momma's Man, eddying around fears of letting go on both sides of the generational divide.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    May not be the best movie ever made about the perils of family life, but it is among the most ruthlessly comic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Does a terrific job of evoking the electric magic of an extraordinary era.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Quiet, observant, and intensely moving whenever Heiskanen is on screen, and it has a valedictory sweep that feels like a summing up.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Terrifically compelling and, more than that, unexpectedly moving.
  10. Her face is as much a part of her comedic form as her observations are. It's an amazing slapstick instrument, creating a scrapbook of living mug shots.
  11. Kurt and Mark's trip to those hot springs is a figurative return to Eden. Anyone who's had a disillusioning reunion with a moony old friend knows what Mark discovers: They're too old to stay that innocent. None of this hit me until after the movie ended. But it hit me hard: You can't go home again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower finds an unexpectedly moving freshness in the old clichés by remaining attentive to the nuances of what happens within and between unhappy teenagers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A haunting experience, one that requires patience (and then some) but that offers spiritual, philosophical, and aesthetic rewards beyond the immediate power of words to describe.
  12. The arrival of closing credits feels like a trap door. The film is over, and, suddenly, we have to leave these people. The directors make no guarantee for their futures, but the strength of their filmmaking inspires you to hope for the best.

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