Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,908 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Listen to Me Marlon
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5908 movie reviews
  1. A sweet screenful of quirky chaos.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s a funny, dark, increasingly razor-sharp inquiry into the metaphysics of modern fame — how the dream of “being seen” and thus validated on some primal level can completely unhinge the average schmo.
  2. One of the year's most winning performances, Logue's Dex will grow on you as he stumbles toward emotional fullness.
  3. What makes Toy Story such a dazzling surprise is that while technological novelty is partly what it's about, it transcends technology. [22 Nov 1995, p.29]
    • Boston Globe
  4. Stillman has become a master at escalating the laughter by waiting an extra beat and then understating something devastatingly funny, as when someone looks Chris Eigeman's club manager, Des, in the eye and says, "I consider you a person of integrity - except, you know, in the matter of women."
  5. Vincent and Theo is one of the great Robert Altman films... It's Altman's most structurally conventional film, although it's filled with such trademarks as overlapping conversations. It's also his most personal and deeply felt. [16 Nov 1990, p.81]
    • Boston Globe
  6. Nobody ever placed brilliance in the service of silliness quite the way the Python gang did. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is stuffed with both.
    • Boston Globe
  7. After a period of creative drought, Zhang’s homecoming is a cause for celebration.
  8. The movie they've assembled is in the vein of 1973's "Wattstax," but it's much more than a concert documentary. It's a jubilant, civic-minded lollapalooza.
  9. It takes a few minutes to catch on, and it would be indiscrete to specify what it is, but once you figure out what’s really strange about it you have entered the solipsistic prison of a tormented mind.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Birdman finds Iñárritu in the mood for play, and with a mighty cast that fields every pitch he throws.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The arrival of Raúl Ruiz’s final work, Night Across the Street, brings the total to four, an elegant, clear-eyed bridge game of artists playing their last trump cards.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At Sundance, Whiplash quickly picked up the nickname “Full Metal Juilliard” on the basis of scenes in which Andrew, plucked from a late-night practice session to be the orchestra’s drummer, is raked over the coals by his new mentor. Horrifying as they are, these sequences are dazzling exercises in total humiliation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is one of the most unforgiving ground-level documentaries about the music business ever made -- the six-string equivalent of "Hoop Dreams."
  10. It's one of the great movies on the vicissitudes of love, commitment, and attraction.
  11. 3
    It's a funny, fearless, suspenseful sex comedy that, in drawing on science and philosophy and art and death, risks accusations of pretentiousness. But, even in its romantic idealism, the movie proceeds according to recognizable rhythms of how some people live.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Coens also understand the stark immediacy of this tale, and they visualize it with brilliantly judged details.
  12. Driving Miss Daisy, about the deepening relationship between a Jewish matron in Atlanta and her black chauffeur, is a luminous joy of a film, heartbreakingly delicate, effortlessly able through indirection to invoke the civil rights era without ever once slipping into portentous pronouncements. [12 Jan. 1990, p.35]
    • Boston Globe
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In the pop high it delivers, this is the greatest prequel ever made.
  13. As often happens in films about putting on plays, life imitates art, but in this instance obliquely.
  14. This is an extraordinary artistic breakthrough from a Mexican director who was already fearlessly good to begin with.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's worth stressing how deeply pleasurable Moolaad is to watch.
  15. You can count on the fingers of one hand the number of works in any given year to which one is moved to apply the word ''masterpiece.'' Raul Ruiz's Time Regained is one of them.
  16. Jane Austen's novel has been rejiggered into a jaunty romantic comedy that leaves us as incandescently happy as its characters.
  17. An innovative hybrid of documentary, staged reading, fictional feature, and confessional, The Arbor defies categorization not merely for art's sake - although its artistry is without question - but because conventional forms seem inadequate for such a harrowing story.
  18. It's so hypnotically breathtaking, you don't realize you're not breathing. By the final shot, you don't realize you're crying either, but there go the tears.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Room unfolds with the privilege of seeing and experiencing the world for the very first time, which is maybe the best we can ever expect from a medium like the cinema.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a movie made with the same coolly fanatical attention to craft the lead character displays in her work. Bigelow is now recognized as one of our true filmmaking naturals.
  19. A grand, dark, grave, severe piece of first-rate cinema.
    • Boston Globe
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's the only film that exists of the Ghetto, and it's both revelatory and profoundly suspect.

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