Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,740 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Letters from Iwo Jima
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
5740 movie reviews
  1. Efficient, cogently argued, and visually compelling documentary.
  2. He's (Dafoe) the stuff bad dreams are made of. He's also the best movie vampire since Schreck's original. He deserves a bloody Oscar.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Those who’ve followed Panahi’s career over the decades will catch echoes of and references to his earlier movies, and at times Taxi is as much a tour of his filmography as it is of Tehran.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s much too easy to call Ajami an Arab-Israeli “Crash,’’ but it’s a pretty good place to start.
  3. The Poe-like atmosphere in Stolen is such a chilling success that when Mashberg says that Gardner would have cracked this case herself, it's impossible to imagine that she isn't out looking for those paintings right now.
  4. The film is rightfully carried by Nico and Dani and under Gay's artful helmsmanship it's carried with remarkable sympathy and believability.
    • Boston Globe
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s when Toy Story 3 becomes a jailbreak movie that it comes into its own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A meditative and intensely beautiful documentary.
  5. Artistically, though, you can’t help but trust him. Like any star turn, Holliday’s performance rings utterly true. It’s that indefinable but unmistakable reality-beyond-reality called art.
  6. The most disorienting and trippiest data-retrieval caper in years.
    • Boston Globe
  7. The kind of richly layered film that Hollywood seldom attempts, much less brings off. But it's more than brought off here in grand, solid style and beautifully crafted detail.
  8. Unstrung Heroes, with its small, detailed brush strokes and its eye for specifics, marks Diane Keaton's directorial breakthrough. [15 Sep 1995]
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Elaborately layered movie about schemes and more schemes that pile up faster than chips on a blackjack table. The other half is realizing, about halfway through the film, that you won't figure it out until it's over.
  9. You can see her (Binoche) effect on Kiarostami's filmmaking: She brings out something new in him, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a slacker detective story, emphasis on the slack, and if you can downshift into its loping rhythms, it's pretty wonderful.
  10. "Grin Without a Cat" brilliantly used montage and a wide intellectual scope to speculate about the history of war and revolution. "Grinning Cat" is a more modest achievement, but the director's wisdom remains robust.
  11. I've never seen a movie so perfectly balanced between unabashed nerdiness and hipness.
  12. Grace is grace, and however it arrives, there's no denying its presence.
  13. Why do Parker and the other clinic owners and staff persevere despite constant harassment and potential assassination? Not for the money, certainly. Perhaps because no one else will.
  14. Henry David Thoreau plays an enigmatic role in Shane Carruth’s hypnotic thriller — an oxymoronic term to describe a film that is truly sui generis.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remains worth seeing as an achingly nostalgic farewell to youthful idealism, tinged with a kind of loving contempt.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Moore's conception of the character is compelling. She rivets us. She's assisted by the superb performances Redford has elicited from her co- stars, Sutherland and Timothy Hutton, who plays Conrad, the guilt-ridden surviving brother of the dead boy. [26 Sep 1980]
    • Boston Globe
  15. Though some of the concepts may be New Age boilerplate, the film’s images linger; especially that of the river, the snake devouring us all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie sprawls, almost entirely in a good sense, and it lets the audience draw its own conclusions. None of them is likely to be rosy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Whenever a band plays in “Persian Cats,’’ the director treats us to a fast, vibrant montage of Iranian faces and street scenes -- as if to say, look, this is who we REALLY are.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brokeback may be too polished for some people, too elegantly dispassionate in its study of choked passion.
  16. Kusama’s handling of point of view is diabolically shrewd. She maximizes the terror potential of the vapidly ostentatious modernist mansion without fetishizing it. She intensifies the monstrosity of some of the characters by making them all too human. And as for guessing the ending — good luck.
  17. Just when you were about to give up on the Internet as a swamp full of trolls, bullies, and liars, along comes a documentary like Ido Haar’s Presenting Princess Shaw.
  18. With Jackson leading the way, Shaft has style, punch, and street cred. It's a hot cool update.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With a tranquil fearlessness, it goes beyond the death of memory, to see what might be found in the unexplored country beyond. The answer is both frightening and comforting: More love. Unspecified love. Universal love.

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