Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,399 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Beautiful Losers
Lowest review score: 0 The Devil Inside
Score distribution:
5,399 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Crazy Love doesn't downplay the awfulness of what happened , but it also knows a good media circus when it sees one.
  1. Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • Boston Globe
  2. Like its stunt work, the movie is both ridiculously hyperactive and a muscular feat of absolute confidence. I don't expect to have a more adrenalizing time at the movies this summer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Butler is a remarkable, even exhilarating movie not for its inherent Gump-itude but for the social portrait that gimmick allows.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What Herzog almost accidentally captures in his viewfinder is profound and unsettling: an entire American underclass where at least some prison time is the norm and where only luck and the grace of God keep a person from either wrong end of the shotgun.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A cleareyed, disarmingly tender adolescent romance that bears comparison with the best of its genre.
  3. Director Penny Marshall's choreography encompasses emotional as well as physical ebbs and flows. Awakenings lives up to its title. [11 Jan 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  4. The achievement of this movie is that Kaurismäki manages the seemingly impossible task of making a farce about farces. In other words, this is a very good movie in quotation marks and a very good movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What's most unusual about the original 24 years later, though, is its elegant minimalism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A much better movie than the one it honors.
  5. Quite apart from wringing the last molecule of vividness from his freewheeling roster of loose cannons, he brings to his direction of Martin a finesse shared by only a few of the directors who have worked with the comedian-actor.
    • Boston Globe
  6. Gray's haunted, obsessional riffs are absorbing theater. Because Demme had the good sense to lay back and not beat them over the head with his cameras, they're equally compelling on film. [27 Mar 1987]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a deceptively impersonal style, because Beyond the Hills seethes with astonishment and rage at a broken society marooned between the 21st century and the 16th.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A broad, foursquare piece of populist filmmaking that happens to be tremendously moving.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Has the impact of a left-right combination to the chin.
  7. Alexandra is a pleasure to watch, but it's also one of those lovely, unclassifiable movies that flourishes better with repeated or prolonged exposures.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Black Book takes the conventions of the WWII epic -- the prison breaks, the interrogation scenes -- and undermines them with craft and muscle and the ripe lack of restraint we've come to expect from this director.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In retrospect, it’s obvious why the film was never produced: The director was a lunatic.
  8. If there is any message in Tarkovsky's work, although as a poet he would never stoop to anything as banal as a message, it is that life is an internal affair, played out in one's soul, not in public.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Aristocrats -- the movie, not the joke -- is a working demonstration of the pleasures of the profane.
  9. Burton, who directed the film with animator Mike Johnson, has rarely been in brisker, friskier form.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If The Trip to Italy begins shakily, it ends with expansive bliss, a father and son reconnecting off the shores of Capri as Gustav Mahler’s art song “Ich Bin Der Welt Abhanden Gekommen (I Am Lost to the World)” sends everyone heart-stoppingly home.
  10. Nathaniel fares well with his father's fellow masters, although Frank Gehry seems evasive.
  11. His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
  12. “The Fog of War” (2003), about McNamara, won Morris a best documentary feature Oscar. The Unknown Known takes its title from a favorite phrase of Rumsfeld. It also accurately describes its subject, whose smiling inscrutability makes him consistently fascinating and often maddening.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like the best spiritual movies, of whatever faith, "Of Gods and Men" moves us toward a union with the infinite, and when we come to the monks' last supper, the moment is staggeringly powerful.
  13. Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Should you see it? Of course you should. Anything Miyazaki does is worth your time. But the movie’s a gorgeous, problematic anomaly in an illustrious career.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The thread that winds through their stories is love lost and connections found, but only the audience is able to weave it into something to keep.
  14. Smart, unpredictable, and alive with the energies of actors who clearly are enjoying being stretched by their material.
    • Boston Globe

Top Trailers