Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,356 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 I'm the One That I Want
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5,356 movie reviews
  1. Pretty clearly determined to deliver the antidote to Stallone's movie, the filmmakers take their cues from Christopher Nolan's Batman filmscape, dropping Dredd into a fictional concrete sprawl (actually South Africa) that's relentlessly grounded, visually and dramatically. In a generic way, the environment works.
  2. Cronenberg hasn't so much filmed Naked Lunch as tamed it, turned it into entertainment, with oozy rubber bugs, big and little, that look left over from David Lynch's movie of "Dune," or the intergalactic dive from "Star Wars." [10 Jan 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  3. If there's nothing here for romantics, there's even less for gourmands. Nettelbeck fails to produce a good food metaphor, let alone an impressive, palate-aching preparation montage
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Youth recedes, the body decays, life is a compromised thing: These are truths. But they're not fresh truths, and Moss's riverdogs are hardly the first to have discovered them.
  4. If we learn nothing else about Krasinski as a filmmaker, it’s that he thinks more is more.
  5. Date Night manages to live down to its store-brand title.
  6. Some entertaining inventiveness, before nagging limitations finally drag it down.
  7. Though offering some chilling twists on the usual conventions, employing wit and restraint where otherwise the filmmakers might have relied on the contents of an abattoir, Aftershock is ultimately predictable in its litany of who lives and who dies, and doesn’t try to be too ironic or self-reflexive about it.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Overstays its welcome.
  8. It's a heart-warmer, a well-meaning movie that sets out to wring a modern message (and preferably some tears) from a famous but largely forgotten moment in history.
  9. It begins promisingly.... But the film has no center, succumbs to drift, and gets away from Hackford. [03 Mar 1984]
    • Boston Globe
  10. The laughless outtakes for ''Armed and Fabulous" helpfully remind us that it could have been worse.
  11. The effects are so showy, and so relentless, that they call attention pretty quickly to the fact that there is not much else to Cats and Dogs.
  12. Unfortunately, the filmmakers seem to have forgotten that comedy is a requisite feature in a comedy.
    • Boston Globe
  13. There is no central drama, no surprise, no tension in his comedy. The ads for Along Came Polly make it look so upbeat and simple that you're convinced it must be hiding something, like death or a disease. But the truth is there in the advertising: nothing happens.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a well-made film that will seem revelatory to moviegoers unfamiliar with the huge, worldwide gaming culture. They’re going to be pretty hard to find, however.
  14. So much of Virgin is bunk masquerading as sexual politics.
  15. Dramatically speaking, The Caveman's Valentine is a dead end.
    • Boston Globe
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Trishna should move the soul and engage the tear-ducts, yet it passes by as distant as it is lovely. And the blame must fall on the movie's star, Freida Pinto.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The issue is contentious, messy, prone to wishful thinking. Some see a corporate plot to privatize schools. Others see a last chance to save them. Won't Back Down is on the latter side, obviously, and it has the boilerplate urgency of a TV movie that has been blessed with a high-end cast.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s one of those multi-character morality plays — think “American Beauty” meets “Crash” — and it will play especially well to freaked-out parents, even as it distances itself from them by acknowledging that the kids (most of them, anyway) are all right.
  16. Doesn't deliver on a lot of fronts. But then again it gives us full-on Faithfull, who manages to bare herself completely without ever actually getting undressed.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is a curious hash: warmly funny in the comic scenes and shamelessly sentimental during the sad bits, of which there are many.
  17. The movie doesn't hang together as a thriller, and the characters don't hang together as interesting people.
  18. You get the sense that the cheap thrill of cheating is like putting a Band-Aid on a broken bone. The movie feels just as inadequate emotionally and psychologically. There's a lot of outward behavior but no inner life.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a lot of intelligence in Transcendence. Ironically, almost all of it feels artificial.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie runs an hour and a half. Lowry’s book can be read in less than a day. It still gives anyone — child or adult — more than enough to wrestle with.
  19. As for the performances, only homely Giovana has heart and depth. The two boys lack chemistry, even in chemistry class, due in part to the trite dialogue, or at least as it is translated in subtitles.
  20. It's a surprise that Stallone is as funny as he is playing a hit man paired with a cop in Bullet to the Head. He's man-cave witty in a way that his "Expendables" movies have strived for but haven't really managed.
  21. If Crossing Over is less self-congratulatory than "Crash" about confronting its designated problem, it's just as inept at dramatizing the complex ways that problem unites and divides us. Here every cause is something you can wear around your neck.

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