Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,193 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Cousin Jules
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
6193 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The real struggle in The Alamo is between historic revisionism and Hollywood notions of sacrifice, and it's not much of a contest: Hollywood wins, as it did in John Wayne's sprawling, factually spurious 1960 film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The producers of Ella Enchanted probably assume, correctly, that many more kids haven't read the book than have, and they're out to give that audience a slick, shallow good time.
  1. Comes up short when things get serious, resorting to cliches and a whole lot of hooey about "moral fiber."
  2. Not as desperate, unfunny, and nonsensical as its title. It's worse. Worse than you can imagine. Unless, of course, you've imagined 90-something minutes of bloopers and outtakes that congeal into a story -- much the way a scab is formed.
  3. Watching it is like being lost in somebody's richly moody campfire story -- it's so good, in fact, that only once it's over do you realize you've been holding your marshmallows too close to the flame.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A textbook example of how a director can strip away plot, motivation, character, and meaning and still leave arrant pretension standing tall.
  4. Boring, mediocre movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So forget about taking anyone under 12. But if you want to see what a benign demon looks like when he's eating nachos and unwinding to Al Green, this is the movie for you.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even older kids will understand that Pixar does it so much better, not because of their computers but because of an intelligent attention to script and character and craft. If the people running Disney don't understand that much anymore, maybe they should turn out the lights and go home.
  5. This is a smart piece of revisionist fluff that dares to question what happens after the royal honeymoon is over.
  6. Walking Tall, which is credited to four different writers, is wanting for a reason to be.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is as spare and unvarnished as a wooden temple floating on a lake, but its reflections run deep, and it can ripple your thoughts for months.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So spectacularly bent that it exudes a contact cough-syrup high all its own.
  7. Eloquent and unapologetically cute.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The loosest, silliest, broadest thing the Coens have yet committed to celluloid, and that includes "Raising Arizona," one of this critic's favorites.
  8. Despite its ultimate nuttiness, has a quiet, consuming power that sneaks up on you and doesn't go away. This is something new and ambitious for Von Trier: a work of compassion.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Invites us to both hate King David and admire his style, and there will probably be some hand-wringing about that.
  9. Ultimately, Bingenheimer seems underwhelmed with himself. The people who know him say, in the movie, that he's a relic. Mayor of the Sunset Strip makes heartbreakingly clear what a glorious relic Bingenheimer is.
  10. Ultimately, Jordan's vision is so murky that Ned Kelly remains as foreign to us as wombat stew.
  11. The 6-year-old I went with had the villain pegged in the first 15 minutes. Needless to say, she completely ruined the movie for me. Meddling kid.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the art-film Carrey: repressed, lovesick, unshaven. Essentially he's doing the same intellectual sad sack played by John Cusack in "Malkovich" and Nicolas Cage in "Adaptation"
  12. Because the characters in the movie have only stock obsessions and vague personal histories, there's no reason to be interested in them.
  13. The movie is weak on attempts at survivalist philosophy (anyone bit by a zombie is likely to become one). Even the religious overtones feel tinny and unpronounced.
  14. Isn't the most seductive film ever made about border life or undocumented immigrants, but in a way it's unfair to compare it to such artistic triumphs as ''Touch of Evil,'' ''El Norte,'' ''Lone Star,'' and ''Traffic.''
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Could fairly be described as a Robert Altman ensemble movie without the flab, or "Magnolia" with a mean streak and bigger laughs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a film lover's film, and as if to underscore the point, Bon Voyage opens and closes in a movie theater.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's comic observations are rich, droll, and more than a little sad: Everyone in this isolated community seems beaten down by life.
  15. Muniz has better secret-agent toys to play with, funnier lines and sidekicks helping him out, and a bit more discerning director in Kevin Allen ("The Big Tease").
  16. A jokey, junky potboiler.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When Spartan is good, it's surprisingly gripping and fresh, and when it's bad, it's just another overcooked Hollywood paranoid thriller.

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