Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,368 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5,368 movie reviews
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The bad news, for those looking forward to The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause with anything like enthusiasm, is this: Bernard the Elf is history.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    In this bilingual morality movie about love, family, and fate, however, the unpredictability turns out to be highly predictable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    21
    The movie's chief audience, consequently, will probably be gullible and young, responding to the cliches only because they haven't seen them before. They have a word in Vegas for these people: Suckers.
  1. Dukakis gets off some of the film's best lines and keeps the worst from sinking the whole affair; Polley's role is limited, but her character's audition for a feminine hygiene commercial is by far the best thing here.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    2 1/2 hours of tumescence disguised as a motion picture.
  2. Cox doesn’t so much chew the scenery as inhale it. Dano looks on in awe.
  3. Franco can be exhilarating in movies -- tremulous, unhinged, a little wild. Here his jaw never stops quivering and his eyes stay welled up, advertising a breakdown that never comes. Not that Myles has a presence a man would fall apart over. She's too professional to drive anybody crazy.
  4. Eckhart doesn’t really do any of that classic grunting as Frankenstein 2.0, but maybe he should have.
  5. It's actually a pretty lousy thriller.
  6. The film logs almost all of its laughs when it's at its crudest, meanest, and most unfiltered. Everything else - and that is to say most of the movie - is a big, fat, derivative waste of time.
  7. Occasionally wills itself to rude, crude life. But most of the time it's pretty limp.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hints at a place where desire, fear, pleasure, and power all intersect, but it never actually goes there.
  8. Finding Home is well meant and earnest but is stretched to almost twice what would have been a comfortable length.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Butter dearly wants to be a hot-button social satire that plays rough with sacred cows: Midwestern power-moms, the religious right, race, sex, you name it. Mostly, it wants to be an Alexander Payne movie from the 1990s. "Citizen Ruth," say, or "Election." Instead, it's a shrill, cartoonish mess.
  9. The tame, confused script eventually sinks the film, although Field shows skill directing actors.
    • Boston Globe
  10. Seeing her (Kidman) in junk like this is a bit like watching the Queen of England eat a Taco Bell chalupa.
  11. Noe's summation is an ideological sucker-punch from a filmmaker who gets off on abusive relationships. He may as well have thrown a big ''whatever'' up on the screen.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A "great poet" movie, the poet in this case being Dylan Thomas, and it's utter bollocks.
  12. The horrible anticipation he [Aja] builds is derailed by a gimmick that makes the twist in, say, ''Fight Club" seem perfectly logical. To say more would be to ruin the movie, and why should I do that when its own makers have done it for you?
  13. The limp script actually has the characters spout ''Let's get outta here!'' more than once. Or maybe that's just a wise member of the audience talking.
  14. It’s just like the Kenny Rogers song says: “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em.” It’s time for this Gambler to walk away.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A noisy and lazy stopgap movie that goes absolutely nowhere and takes 2 1/2 hours to get there.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Primeval is a hoot if you're in the mood, though, and it gets points for trying to stuff a little globo-think into the minds of Friday night mayhem fans (who will probably rebel, since only one skull pops like a grape).
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Not good enough to take seriously and, sadly, not bad enough to be any fun.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Big Eyes may not be Tim Burton’s absolute worst movie — we’ll always have “Planet of the Apes” — but it’s pretty close to the bottom. It’s also the film that reveals his weaknesses as a director and, by their absence, his strengths. Gaudy, shallow, shrill, smug, the movie proves beyond a whisker of doubt that Burton has little interest in human beings unless they can be reduced to cartoons.
  15. At the very least, a movie like this requires coherence to stay afloat. Barring that, it needs a star to distract us.
  16. The one-sidedness of Farmageddon isn't just an artistic failing. It's an argumentative failing, too.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Del Toro does remind you of Brando here; unfortunately, it's the Brando of ''Apocalypse Now,'' the one with the green face and puffy line readings. Jones fares better, even if he wears the same grieving-for-humanity expression throughout the film.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A veritable rip-off of 1995's "The Usual Suspects," Beach's crime caper not-so-subtly apes Bryan Singer's use of multiple red herrings and flashback-heavy interrogation scenes, but lacks the stylistic flair and sophisticated narrative skills to pull off a similar feat of cinematic intrigue.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Works hard to give quirk a bad name.

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