Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,262 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
5,262 movie reviews
  1. What is offensive is how the masquerade punks these other people - and to no seeming purpose, other than to provide Gandhi with footage for this documentary.
  2. This is a terrible little movie even by the standards of the genre.
  3. It's always raining or snowing or misting. This makes for a nice visual, but it also makes the scenes look interchangeable. This is even more of a problem because the writer-director, Michael J. Bassett, imparts no shape to the story. Many movies suffer from worse problems, but not many waste the talents of Max von Sydow, as Solomon's father, or Pete Postlethwaite.
  4. The best we get here are modest action diversions.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Unfunny, predictable, and vulgar, it’s the generic equivalent of a Judd Apatow movie. As always, you get what you pay for.
  5. Back to the Future III has no future. The reason is that it never works up much of a past as it sends its gull-winged DeLorean time machine back to the Old West. In effect, it goes back to the Age of Steam and runs out of gas. [25 May 1990, p.45]
    • Boston Globe
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The film’s zippy graphics are a treat, but its zippy arguments are slipshod.
  6. Not that there’s all manner of comedy craftsmanship demanding study here, but the movie does seem to be a funny jumble of contradictory impulses.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Pain & Gain, a jokey but fatally tone-deaf true-crime caper, plays like “Fargo” for idiots.
  7. Quaint and crass get together — or would that be “bump uglies”? — with awkward, thoroughly flat results in The Big Wedding, an ensemble comedy with a tonal cluelessness as surprising as the name cast that signed on for it anyway.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Kick-Ass 2 is a special kind of crap: the kind smart people make for audiences they think are stupid.
  8. In the end, it’s hard to remember another action entry that expends so much energy on frenetic blacktop choreography and attention-deficit editing with so little to show for it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hess has made a classic rookie director mistake: Any spoof has to be at least as smart as the thing it’s spoofing, and this one’s twice as dumb.
  9. Just one more touch of “realism” in a sexual melodrama played so straight that it’s nuts.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Some documentaries are an embarrassment of riches. Salinger is merely an embarrassment.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Carlos Carlei’s Romeo and Juliet is a failure of skill.
  10. Somewhere between John Cassavetes’s “Husbands” (1970) and “The Hangover” (2009) you will find Last Vegas. Not necessarily a bad place to be, except the film unfortunately has the madcap hilarity of the former and the emotional intensity of the latter.
  11. No doubt a labor of love, the result is just plain laborious for the audience.
  12. As for the dialogue, although the characters talk really fast, swear a lot, and overlap their lines, what they’re saying isn’t very funny or authentic. It’s as if David Mamet collaborated on writing an episode of “Two and a Half Men.”
  13. Despite such attractions as Gabriel Byrne as a vampire with a skin disease and a décor that combines Hogwarts with “Suspiria,” the only lesson learned here is that Hollywood needs fresh blood.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    3 Days to Kill is pretty terrible, but it’s not really Kevin Costner’s fault.
  14. Misogynistic, homophobic, scatological — none of these words come up in any of the spelling bees that take place in Jason Bateman’s directorial debut, but they apply to the film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of those loud, cringe-y female-empowerment comedies that feels like it was made by people who hate women.
  15. The Quiet Ones simply has nothing to say.
  16. This is mythology that’s famously transportive in every sense, but the animators struggle to take us anywhere truly captivating, or even clearly defined.
  17. One thing you have to give Bay credit for: He has a knack for bringing A-list talent down to his level. Like Mark Wahlberg, Oscar nominee for “The Fighter” and “The Departed.”
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As an actor, Braff does thin-skinned sad-sack quite well. As a writer, he’s hopelessly banal. As a director, he’s a disaster.
  18. Is Borgman a fable? A fairy tale? A parable? An allegory? A burlesque of Western bourgeois life in the 21st century? One thing Dutch writer-director Alex van Warmerdam’s film isn’t is a black comedy, even if that’s what it’s meant to be. The movie’s black, all right, but a comedy has to be funny.
  19. None of this is as riotously zany as it wants to be.
  20. It’s an idea that could make for decent genre viewing, if only its cast had some range, and its indie reach didn’t exceed its mainstream-polished grasp.

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