Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,303 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
5,303 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A history lesson for a country and a people forced to forget at gunpoint.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If there's a larger theme in Zatoichi, it's that nobody is quite who he or she seems.
  1. It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie's masterstroke is to avoid interviewing the usual anti-globalist suspects and let solid, hard-working middle Americans speak.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A film of great ingenuity and imagination, full of suggestive power, and it deserves to be seen.
  2. Warm, smart, and funny!
    • Boston Globe
  3. An upsetting landmark. Don't take the children.
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Queen of Versailles is still worthwhile, not because it questions all-American entitlement but because it prompts us to think hard about what, exactly, we believe we're entitled to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An entertainment to be not just seen but absorbed on a molecular level; it's as close to a full-body experience as we'll get until they invent the holo-suits. Cameron aims for sheer wonderment, and he delivers.
  4. Everything about Chop Shop is modest - the movie's scale, the characters' ambitions. Another director might have tried to nudge the film's grim detours toward tragedy. And that might have worked, too. But Bahrani is a refreshingly deceptive director in that sense.
  5. Adults should find its simmering drama at least as compelling as teens will, even if parental figures are only slightly more present here than in a " Peanuts" comic strip.
  6. Here the Japanese senses of honor and of shame are particularly entangled. Later in the film, Lu mounts an Imperial Army parade through the Nanking ruins. It's something to see.
  7. It's the best drug-busting movie since ''The French Connection.''
  8. Like the children’s films of Iranian directors Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi, Bad Hair explores such social pathology, in part, in the guise of a kids’ movie. But it also takes on the intensity of more pointed films such as “Bicycle Thieves” (1948) and even Hector Babenco’s sensationalistic “Pixote” (1981).
  9. It sounds like the old unstoppable-force-meets-immovable-object trick. Ramin Bahrani's Goodbye Solo has the trappings of such a story, but, mercifully, none of the follow-through.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Think of it as "Glee" without music. Without a net, too.
  10. Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
  11. It is haunting in its literal and symbolic meanings, which is the powerful, lingering effect of Yellow Asphalt.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The great pleasure of le Carré-land — for some, it’s the frustration — is that one’s own moral certainties are quickly stood on their head.
  12. Funny, gritty, filled with surprising stabs of feeling, Parenthood is a stretch for Ron Howard, its director. This new adult comedy has the generosity of "Cocoon" and "Splash," but it takes Howard into deeper, darker, messier territory. [2 Aug 1989, p.57]
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The only question his movie doesn't ask is "What do you want your next car to run on?" That's up to you.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Essential viewing for anyone who wants to know the roots -- and perils -- of modern political dissent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A compelling and eerily effective little drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Crazy Love doesn't downplay the awfulness of what happened , but it also knows a good media circus when it sees one.
  13. Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • Boston Globe
  14. Like its stunt work, the movie is both ridiculously hyperactive and a muscular feat of absolute confidence. I don't expect to have a more adrenalizing time at the movies this summer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Butler is a remarkable, even exhilarating movie not for its inherent Gump-itude but for the social portrait that gimmick allows.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What Herzog almost accidentally captures in his viewfinder is profound and unsettling: an entire American underclass where at least some prison time is the norm and where only luck and the grace of God keep a person from either wrong end of the shotgun.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A cleareyed, disarmingly tender adolescent romance that bears comparison with the best of its genre.
  15. Director Penny Marshall's choreography encompasses emotional as well as physical ebbs and flows. Awakenings lives up to its title. [11 Jan 1991]
    • Boston Globe

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