Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,356 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Innocence
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
5,356 movie reviews
  1. Films that achieve the dimension of seraphic embrace achieved by 'Innocence, as it explores a return to first love, are the rarest of the rare.
    • Boston Globe
  2. Sensuous and rarefied, elevating its particulars into epiphanies, The Long Day Closes is as joyful as introversion gets. [9 July 1993, p.25]
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The new film lives up to expectations and, indeed, pushes past them into virtually unmapped territory.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An exhilarating tale of magic, machines, memories, and dreams, Martin Scorsese pulls off the neatest trick of all. He marshals the marvels of modern movie technology - up to and including the dreaded 3-D - to create a love letter to the earliest of movies and, by extension, to every movie from then to now.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    She's (Hushpuppy) trying to make sense of this world, and the movie, pitched between realism and fable, is the story of how she finally does. That balance is the key to the movie's magic.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are three Poles in The Pianist -- Szpilman, Polanski, and Frederic Chopin. Of the three, fittingly, Chopin speaks the loudest.
  3. Not about crashing into walls or crashing into other people. It's about crashing into yourself and living to tell the tale.
  4. Music for the eyes. That's why it has become a treasured classic. That's why we'll see it again and again.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All Is Lost works quite brilliantly on its most basic narrative level.
  5. The ends remain loose in The White Ribbon.’ But that lack of closure is thrilling. Haneke lays his movie and its mysteries at our feet, leaving us to ask, “What in tarnation?’’
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The best American film of the year to date.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    12 Years a Slave is to the “peculiar institution” what “Schindler’s List” was to the Holocaust: a work that, finally, asks a mainstream audience to confront the worst of what humanity can do to itself. If there’s no Oskar Schindler here, that’s partly the point.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    On the level of craft, the movie's just absurdly enjoyable. Sorkin's dialogue dazzles; the photography is burnished and sleek; the editing confidently sorts out a complex narrative.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Writer-director Cristian Mungiu confirms the Romanian cinema renaissance while creating a paradoxical marvel: a bleak tale of illegal abortion that powerfully affirms one's faith in people.
  6. With impeccable skill, Akin has made a film roiling with cruelty but guided by tough political optimism. No, we can't all get along, but some us of are trying.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Generations from now, when people talk about horse movies, they won't be talking about "National Velvet" or "My Friend Flicka," they'll be talking about the majestic beauty of Carroll Ballard's The Black Stallion. [07 Feb 1980]
    • Boston Globe
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Chaplin's sentimental politics and peerless comic invention dovetailed more perfectly in this film than in any other he made.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As the Friedmans split apart like fissile neutrons, their story becomes five stories, none of which is remotely like the others.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's those noir bones that give this social-realist drama its punch, as if Humphrey Bogart had been recast as a 17-year-old girl and dropped into the poorest corner of America.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Cousin Jules is one of those rare experiences that’s rooted in the past yet feels very much of the moment. On top of that, it’s timeless.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The one aspect of the original Producers that still stuns is the roaring, over-the-top, in-your-face thereness of its two lead performances.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The chance to watch a four-star classic the way it was meant to be seen -- fresh print, big screen -- is so rare as to be worth the trip.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A comic put-on of awe-inspiring crudity and death-defying satire and by a long shot the funniest film of the year. It is "Jackass" with a brain and Mark Twain with full frontal male nudity.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of his (Bergman's) most life-affirming films.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a work of cruel comic genius, in some ways even crueler than “No Country for Old Men.’’
  7. Watching it is a nonstop high.
    • Boston Globe
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an altogether satisfying drama -- the sort of movie some people complain they don't make anymore. So here it is; what's your excuse?
  8. One of the truest, most beautiful movies ever made about two strangers.
  9. The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
  10. It's more than science, more than biography, more than metaphor. Fusing all three and linking them to a profound human dimension that never cheapens the man or his macrospeculations, it ties them to shared human destiny. As Morris' elliptical style circles and deepens its themes with each pass, A Brief History of Time turns into film's own expanding universe. [14 Sep 1992, p.50]
    • Boston Globe

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