Boston Globe's Scores

For 2,028 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
2028 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If this sounds ambitious, it is. But Russell pulls it off with an engaging nobility.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the rigor and directness of the voice-music connection--and the apparent lack of artifice--that makes for the work's stark power.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The pieces don't always fit, making Solid State her most uneven album in at least a decade. But every track offers the pleasure of Phillips's marvelous voice, which sounds like Scotch seeping through cracks in wood.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its songs are more impressionistic, brash in their knotty arrangements and assured in their execution.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    New Found Glory is at its best when sounding highly caffeinated, even if breakneck tempos belie a song's blue mood.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    McCreery has plenty of deepening left to do as a performer, but he's off to a good start with this 12-track set about girls, God, family, and small-town life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If this intermittently pleasant but insignificant album has a purpose, it's to prove that the 74-year-old country legend can still do it like clockwork.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Conatus is moody mermaid music.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sixteen radio-length tracks that include a gorgeous, ethereal version of "Across the Universe" whose somber violin and country twang could bring on tears; a honky-tonk take of "Revolution" that makes you want to square-dance; a sleepy, dreamy redo of "Imagine" in which Frisell takes considerable care to pick just the right notes not only when he plays the melody but when he improvises; a folk cover of "Julia" that contains not an ounce of cynicism; and an almost ambient sketch of "Give Peace a Chance" that dares the listener to find the original melody buried deep within.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The story goes that Jay-Z told Cole he had his whole life to make his debut album. Cole may have taken that literally, but it was worth it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Blink-182 again delivers a record with nothing outright awful and enough dynamite songs to pack a punch at future tours.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brain tickling aside, this is a supremely enjoyable, stylish, and modern-sounding record, which isn't easy to pull off for a guitar band with a tendency to look backward.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jones furthers the exploratory path he's committed himself to, with tranquil yet compelling acoustic steel-string guitar compositions built from thoughtful open tunings ("Of Its Own Kind"), expressive bottleneck guitar ("Even to Win Is to Fail"), and even banjo ("The Great Swamp Way Rout").
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The bulk of the album's melodies and arrangements are too busily discursive to hum after the fact, making it tough for Night of Hunters to do what Amos set out to do: haunt the listener.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, the writing is richer, peaking with the somber songcraft of "Last Salmon Man."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mockingbird Time revisits what made the Louris-Olson Jayhawks truly distinctive: the omnipresent, twining, joyous interplay of their voices. That pairing is here again in full force.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The results are predictably formulaic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ready for Confetti may be a little different, but it's still very much Robert Earl.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Add Lauderdale's terrific musical stylings, the twangy expressiveness of his singing, and his backing ensemble's crack playing, and what results is a classic bluegrass sound that is yet just a turn off-center.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With its meat-and-potatoes disco-punk beat and rousing keys, it feels like it's reaching beyond the known universe of the typical club scene.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Buckingham needs the tension of Fleetwood Mac to bring out his best work. He can get too quirkily self-indulgent on his own, but this new solo album, Seeds We Sow, has moments of considerable beauty.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    King George isn't breaking new ground, but Here for a Good Time doesn't threaten his crown.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It adds up to a record that's full of charm, but you wonder about its sticking power. Asa still feels like a tremendous talent who could stand to take more risks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The mastermind behind many hits, including Black Eyed Peas' "I Gotta Feeling,'' doesn't break new ground on his fourth album. Instead, he brings together many of today's pop superstars and offers a platform as swooshes, squiggles, and propulsive beats elevate them to club heaven.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An impressive array of musicians - Chris Isaak, Brian Setzer, Billy Corgan, Dick Dale - help make it a fitting tribute to Campbell's accomplishments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are spots that are curiously flat, which feels illogical given how much Flea's bass bubbles, Chad Smith's drums skitter and thump, and how captivating Klinghoffer's left-turn fillips can be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Tassili, Tinariwen reasserts its leadership through a return to roots - setting aside electric guitars and leaving off the female singers who added drive and bustle to previous albums, and going lean and acoustic in sessions recorded under a tent in the Algerian desert.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Because of the jail time, Tha Carter IV feels like a comeback album when it shouldn't. Regardless, it comes off monotonous and redundant but, more than that, uninspired.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hatfield has again delivered a crisp collection of tunes that mostly succeeds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Streisand, who produced it herself, has a soft spot for orchestrations that are just a little too sweet, languid piano balladry, and lilting, midtempo cocktail-hour ambience that would be more fun if it had some swing.