Boston Globe's Scores

For 2,011 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 City of Refuge
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
2011 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Jamey Johnson's sterling tribute to the late, great country music tunesmith Hank Cochran will either provide solace or send you to Costco to buy Kleenex in bulk.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Some of the band’s unique flavor still remains, as in the collaboration between Albarn, Pusha T, and Mavis Staples on “Let Me Out,” an unlikely match that wonderfully locks together. But without a unified sound or story to focus on, the album sometimes falls into the modern sinkhole of too many options presented at once.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While there are a few standard contemporary country tracks included in the mix--including a serviceable cover of Gavin DeGraw’s “Not Over You,” featuring DeGraw on harmony vocals--the tracks that stand out have a fresh appeal.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    By unshackling its adventurous side, the band helps Line soar gracefully, at least in part.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You’ll find oblique references [to the departure of producer Chris Walla and frontman Ben Gibbard’s divorce from actress Zooey Deschanel], but it’s just as easy to find yourself in these 11 tracks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Of course, substance is in the eye of the beholder, and the lyrics don’t much stray from Kiss standbys such as partying, sex and, naturally, rock ’n’ roll. The results are appropriately direct and unambiguous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What works as therapeutic psychodrama for the singer doesn't always work quite as well as pop music, which, from the shiny surfaces, it's clear everyone here is still striving for.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Lucky 7 is a bit too comfortable; despite consistently solid returns, it would be nice to see Statik raise the stakes the next time he’s up to bet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Buckingham needs the tension of Fleetwood Mac to bring out his best work. He can get too quirkily self-indulgent on his own, but this new solo album, Seeds We Sow, has moments of considerable beauty.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He's at his best when he slips into his expressive falsetto, but Miguel frequently comes off too remote for a true soul singer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Depending on your susceptibility to this cut-and-paste style (and probably your age), it could be either the best thing, or the worst, you've heard all year.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yes
    Pet Shop Boys have been deeply entrenched in their sound for several albums now. They're practically a genre unto themselves; not many bands, much less American ones, are still making the sweeping, orchestral dance pop that PSB pioneered.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album was recorded on a 4-track in the singer’s basement, and the lo-fi treatment certainly suits his grizzly voice. In fact, the downtrodden lyrics on the yelping stomper “Paradise Blues’’ and the jangly “Gone Man’’ are more or less redeemed by the songs’ sparsely elegant arrangements.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The variations will be more palpable to longtime fans--a bit more chunky, melodic rock, a little less alt-country--than to anyone just discovering this rousing band.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [The music] gurgles gradually into consciousness like the titular binary, the colors of sunrise and sunset enveloping in the electronically rooted compositions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The songs are less oblique than their last couple of albums, almost to a fault.... But their lyrical theme of being embattled with themselves remains.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s not easy packing so many different styles of music into one song--especially ones that don’t stray too far from home in terms of baseline mood--but it certainly helps when so many of them fall between the five-and seven-minute mark, as on the sixth album from British act Elbow.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It would be nice to see him move beyond his content comfort zone, but Cam'ron's virtuoso verbal onslaught pays off frequently enough to take this disc to a higher level.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is among his most overtly jazz-tinged work, produced by Morrison and recorded in his native Belfast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Jim
    Old is made new again in the best possible way on what could surely be the perfect soundtrack for a sultry, soulful summer.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Nothing here is quite as instantly engaging as MS MR’s breakthrough single, “Hurricane,” but the duo’s gaze remains trained on both the expanse of the horizon and the insularity of the internal drama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It confirms that the group's sudden success wasn't overnight, but rather overdue.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    More fascinating than strictly enjoyable, All Days is the sound of an artist shaking his thoughts out onto paper to see what they look like and get his hands around them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Working from a songbook he's been crafting over many years, Robbins wears his influences with pride.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mudvayne used to be viewed as somewhat of a joke band with its costumes and makeup, but they're more out front and naked now, with markedly more genuine results.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Banks’s debut solo outing is a leap forward--and notably away - from his band’s rigid blueprint that hinges on cold calculation and angular rhythm.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Certainly an orchestra is a big enough umbrella, but some of the songs--from both the Police and Sting's solo career--definitely end up getting wet.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Maybe that's why Aphrodite is such a letdown -- there's nothing nuanced or even catchy about the material. It's a perfectly serviceable soundtrack to a thumping Friday night, but it's also a flat listen.
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He wonders aloud what happens to ageing punk rockers on “Rumble at the Rainbo” and waxes nostalgic on “Lariat.” “Independence Street” summons his reverence for Lou Reed with lyrics so wry and a vocal delivery so laconic that Reed himself would have approved.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Pixies sound like a band again on Indie Cindy. From time to time, they even sound like the Pixies.