Boston Globe's Scores

For 991 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Friday Night Lights: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Unan1mous: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 474
  2. Negative: 0 out of 474
474 tv reviews
  1. This promising series is really about a failed optimist, driven by the recession and his own midlife depression to sell his body to rich ladies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As Deb-inside-Jane, Elliott does a great job portraying pathos, absurd disappointment, and wide-eyed discovery. She’s far more interesting to watch than the other characters.
  2. Rest assured, the show itself hasn’t changed. Producers know better than to violate certain television principles, and what makes this contest work is what always has: that hostess Tyra Banks is one fabulous brand of crazy.
  3. Stargate Universe isn’t quite so ambitious [as "Lost"], but it’s intriguing in its way, down to the ship, bathed in blue light, that emerges as a character in its own right. The ship is more interesting thus far, alas, than any of the female characters, but perhaps that will change over time.
  4. It is a treat, if not a revelation, for fans. This is very well plowed ground, after all. As for the as yet uninitiated, what they don’t find baffling they’ll likely find excessive.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The creative team did not find the right chemistry until the second episode. But Men of a Certain Age does settle into a groove, and it’s a good one.
  5. It’s a coming of age comedy that’s raunchy and sophomoric, but, as is typical with Apatow products, it’s also character-based and at times kind of touching.
  6. You feel as if you're right there in the room with the characters for a time, during which their true selves emerge slowly but surely.
  7. It never quite dazzles, even as it impresses, and it misses some of Austen's ironic turns. But this is certainly a worthy adaptation, summoning all that is enduring about Austen.
  8. Lie to Me, based on the real-life lie-detection work of Dr. Paul Ekman, doesn't extend much beyond its genre's borders. But if you're fascinated by the poker-game elements of crime-solving and a man obsessed with "tells," you may connect with this show.
  9. The new ABC show is significantly better than its corny title promises.
  10. Little Dorrit has so many virtues--indelible performances, stirring pathos, and an emotional and psychological heft unusual for Dickens--that you can forgive its one significant flaw.
  11. The show is what it is--no surprises, no disappointments.
  12. Parks and Recreation has many distinctions, not least of all the hugely talented Poehler from "Saturday Night Live," who promises to develop Leslie slowly, without the haste required in sketch comedy. And the show has the potential to become a flip, witty political allegory.
  13. The pieces don't tend to add up to much; the suspects and victims often slip out of custody too easily; and each episode's crimes dovetail with some predictability. These aren't brain teasers. Still, the series has great hypnotic allure, as the murders and deaths drive Wallander further into himself.
  14. The one-liners are broad, the plots preposterous. And yet it all works in a lighthearted-summer-fare kind of way, helped along with almost pornographic images of Hamptons wealth.
  15. If there's a glaring flaw, it's in the character of Dr. Eleanor O'Hara (Eve Best). As comic relief, she's far too thin. Nurse Jackie has much richer, darker comedy to offer.
  16. Ruby & the Rockits has no right to be as likable as it is ... But “Ruby & the Rockits’’ turns out to be a warm intergenerational comedy that never pushes life lessons in your face.
  17. It’s the grade of funny this show seems to have accepted - cute, giggle-worthy, and only a smidgen dangerous.
  18. Househusbands of Hollywood is a lot more real than I expected it to be.
  19. So I "like" the new Melrose Place, in that I think it has the potential to be as addictive, and phony, as a can of Pringles potato crisps.
  20. The show is overstuffed with political and pop culture jokes about everything from 9/11 to “The Breakfast Club,’’ but they’re always secondary to the warm ensemble character comedy. The free-floating irony isn’t terminal.
  21. It’s all about the crimes, the technology, the guns, and, mostly about not having--or wanting--to think too much.
  22. Over the course of the premiere episode, [Paul] Gross grew on me, as did the show itself.
  23. FlashForward is a good idea, and while that’s no guarantee of a good series, the first hour gives us reason to hope.
  24. Lock ’n Load treats Wayne and many fellow customers as curiosities, and occasionally smacks of condescension. (The “Amazing Grace’’ sequence, in particular, crosses a line.) But the series also takes pains to avoid making judgments, and offers a parade of gun owners so vast that we end up with a broad view.
  25. A week between each episode is highly recommended. But in small doses, his shamelessness, persistence, and humor are remarkable.
  26. I think How to Make It in America has a lot going for it, if show creator Ian Edelman can keep from indulging in New York hipster cliches.
  27. This farcical new sitcom won’t blow you away so much as keep you lightly amused.
  28. Even as you may be tempted on occasion to roll (or close) your eyes, it’s hard not to be drawn in at least partway.

Top Trailers