Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,165 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Sons Of Hollywood: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 573
  2. Negative: 0 out of 573
573 tv reviews
  1. The rebooted Homeland promises to be an engaging, streamlined CIA thriller with a few big ideas about America and the war on terrorism.
  2. It's one thing to look like you have no sense of reality. It's quite another to look like you have no sense of humor. [17 July 2004, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
  3. There were quibbles to be had with some of the casting--um, Mario Lopez?--some flat punch lines, one major sound glitch, a bizarrely haphazard approach to sanitizing the racier bits, and uneven pacing and tone. But, the frothy ’50s-set high school musical was so expertly executed and choreographed visually and exuberantly performed by most of the actors that it more than compensated for its flaws.
  4. It was vintage Conan stuff, proof that his absurdist sense of humor won't change much on the West Coast. And yet last night also contained some grand nods to O'Brien's fancy new home.
  5. All of the material crammed into tonight's episode is both intriguing and tensely directed (by Martin Campbell, "Casino Royale"), raising a host of strong possibilities for the show's future.
  6. If Rock and co-creator Ali LeRoi can continue to bring depth to the characters without succumbing to cliche or sentiment, they will be on a promising path.
  7. Despite the occasional artificial reality flourish, Catfish: The TV Show is a timely, engaging, and often poignant addition to MTV's lineup.
  8. To embrace "Knights," you have to have a taste for the kind of comedy that teases because it loves.
  9. It’s thoroughly transporting.
  10. But the real question is: Will Dharma & Greg be able to expand its central, single joke into an entire series? An entertaining premiere, yes, but there may be a finite number of laughs to be had over those wacky hippies and the cold-hearted WASPs. [24 Sept 1997, p.C6]
    • Boston Globe
  11. At points, the new episodes strain to link past and present, with Thackery launching into didacticism about how addiction needs to be viewed as an illness, and not a moral failing. His argument seems a bit too forward-thinking, and it threatens the show’s hard-earned period authenticity. But generally, the writing pulls in still-festering themes effortlessly, blending them with plotlines that are never less than engaging.
  12. Tonight's premiere isn't one of the series' most cleverly wrought scripts; it's more of a welcome-back party than a gem.
  13. It’s a bit of a rarity, an intimate, sprawling, and at times touching procedural that makes the networks’ versions of the genre look like simple board games.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ABC drama starring Annie Potts is not only a vast improvement on the film, but also restores some of the integrity of Johnson's book. [30 Sept 1996, p.C10]
    • Boston Globe
  14. The show seems to have a light step this season without the heavy-duty silliness of Kim ... And it is refreshing to see many new faces at CTU. [8 Jan 2005]
    • Boston Globe
  15. This kind of material would wear thin after a while if the characters weren't as distinct and endearing as they are. [30 Apr 2005]
    • Boston Globe
  16. As much as this is a story of the pressures facing teenage girls, it's also a striking, honest look at the parent-child relationship, with its ebbs and flows of communication and trust.
  17. The feverish action is as tantalizing as ever, and so is the script.
  18. Halter is also the most heartless of the principals, in a tough-love sort of way.... [But] Most of the time, though, this show makes you wish that the principals had sharper teeth.
  19. The Affair is still going to be a melodrama with pretty people having big feelings, but the potential to transcend that genre is happily in play. The first two episodes of Season 2 are rich, as series creators Sarah Treem and Hagai Levi expand the points of view to include those of Alison’s ex, Cole (Joshua Jackson), and Noah’s ex, Helen (Maura Tierney).
  20. Burns and Novick know that what happens on the field makes baseball interesting--and what happens in the hearts and minds of its followers is what makes it great. That mingling of action and ardor (technical expertise, too) is what makes The Tenth Inning such fine viewing.
  21. The show needs some sharpening, but "Murphy Brown" looks like a winner. [14 Nov 1988]
    • Boston Globe
  22. By making seemingly real people do bad things, 'Larry Sanders' becomes an adept satire of corporate and human behavior as well as a delicious satire of a specific industry. [19 Sep 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  23. I want to be [hooked], because the actors are so charismatic. Remember Ehle with Colin Firth in PBS's 1995 "Pride & Prejudice"? But the New Agey ghost-as-conscience thing--done better with so much crazy verve in the hallucinatory "Eli Stone"--is strained by the end of the first episode
  24. This is a million miles from PBS and Mirren, but it works because of Bello's visceral energy.
  25. The first episode of Grandfathered is amusing and shows promise.
  26. The romance and the attractively stylized innocence of the era is addictive, but the espionage plot, with its link to political history, is absurd.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's a deliciously post-modern and surreal sitcom that succeeds both on a silly and an intellectual level. [2 Oct 2001, p.46]
    • Boston Globe
  27. The show falls somewhere between Woody Allen's film about the '40s, "Radio Days," and TV's version of the '60s, "The Wonder Years," both in time and sensibility. It doesn't have Allen's visual or verbal wit and it doesn't have the polish of "The Wonder Years." But it does have an honesty that "Wonder Years" lost when it ran away from sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll. [20 Sep 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  28. The most interesting feature of the program is how it stays specific to Smith's underclass style while fashioning a story that the whitest of white people can easily relate to. That's achieved, in part, by making Smith's relatives unbelievably broad. You've never met Boston Brahmins as preppy as these people. It's the weakest part of the program, but it allows Smith to have a great time playing Groucho Marx to his family's Margaret Dumont. [10 Sept 1990, p.35]
    • Boston Globe

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