Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,075 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Rescue Me: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Twenty Good Years: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 524
  2. Negative: 0 out of 524
524 tv reviews
  1. For fans of expertly hammy acting and heated-up supernatural doings, it’s a lot of fun. But if Logan wants to elevate Penny Dreadful from an entertaining and overdone lark to something richer and more thematic, he will need to keep changing things up.... With a bit of clever revisionism and an infusion of our current anxieties into these dated tropes, the show could become something a bit more interesting and dread-filled.
  2. Winfrey had said that she wanted O'Donnell to be herself, and her new hire lived up to that expectation with perfectly familiar results.
  3. The Office is less breezy and more warped than almost any sitcom on the American networks. For viewers accustomed to shiny, happy escapism, NBC's The Office speaks a new comic language of glum realism. Like the original, which was co-created by Stephen Merchant and the show's star, Ricky Gervais, it is a queasy portrait of corporate depression, characters who rarely smile, and bleak irony. It is funny, but slowly and painfully so.
  4. What distinguishes the good ones are colorful performances, scandalous twists, and the age-old reminder that money and power can't buy love--all of which Political Animals has.
  5. It's supposed to be a story of New York and its many demons, but it works best as a tale of loud, proud, surprisingly brittle men.
  6. Haynes takes a few melodramatic moments too many feet over the top--the injuring of Veda's throat, for example, which rises into an almost laughable delirium. But those excesses are forgivable in this otherwise masterful, faithful, and deluxe adaptation.
  7. If you approach The Girl as a sliver, and don't expect a full serving, you are more apt to appreciate it.
  8. So I "like" the new Melrose Place, in that I think it has the potential to be as addictive, and phony, as a can of Pringles potato crisps.
  9. ''Rollergirls" is a colorful piece of reality TV.
  10. Boston’s Finest is refreshingly free of reality TV’s more insipid and manipulative dramatic tricks.... [But] It can be a little dull over the long haul, perhaps because the action we see isn’t particularly interesting and the family lives of the cops are relatively incident-free.
  11. No, it's not "quality cable TV" or Top 10 list material, and it's marred by lapses into character cutesiness. But still, I liked it. It's likable.
  12. An intriguing though uneven mixture of "Miami Vice," "Less than Zero" and, most of all, an extended 501 Jeans ad. [21 May 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  13. Wisely, show creator Sean Jablonski does not cast blame on either of the Trumans for their marital mess. That makes the characters more interesting and sympathetic, rather than merely a victim and an offender.
  14. We know the end point for these two; they’re made for each other. But the writing makes the bumpy journey nonetheless entertaining.
  15. The show doesn't pretend to be anything more than what it is--a violent, sexy, somewhat cheesy, but generally entertaining genre drama--and that makes it easier to like.
  16. With only three one-hour episodes, screenwriter Heidi Thomas needed more time to do full justice to the large cast of characters and the many historical and melodramatic story lines she set up.
  17. The show has a nice sense of innocence, thanks to Wood's gentle performance and the theme of personal transformation; but it is also filled with uneven sexual and scatological jokes, delivered with a dog-like lack of modesty, so viewer be warned. For some, that level of humor is a deal breaker.
  18. If this “Battleship” meets “Contagion,” tension plus ick factor, hazmat-suits-for-all! kind of tale is your bag of summer escapism, then by all means climb aboard The Last Ship. It may be all formula and archetypes, but that’s Bay’s bread and butter, and the first two hours pack enough oomph to make you want to see what happens when the Ship finally pulls into port.
  19. This season is very good, but it’s only four episodes, and they’ve been tragically whittled down by BBC America to make room for commercials. The result is choppy, with a few critical connections missing in the investigation of Luther and in the progress of Luther’s relationship with Mary.
  20. Grantchester makes for very easy viewing, in the manner of so many of the “Masterpiece” mysteries. The murder plots are extremely light and undemanding, without being insulting.
  21. This is still not conventional TV, but season three gets closer, and that’s not an entirely bad thing. The cringe ratio is down--slightly--and characters begin to emerge in unexpected ways.
  22. It’s all about the crimes, the technology, the guns, and, mostly about not having--or wanting--to think too much.
  23. The CBS show has very little dramatic heft or distinction, but it's wily and brisk enough to engage you for an hour.
  24. Coughlan smartly underplays Jenny's reaction to the thought of losing her friend. But Nagle and her writers plug a farcical charge into the show that is quickly annoying.
  25. Stargate Universe isn’t quite so ambitious [as "Lost"], but it’s intriguing in its way, down to the ship, bathed in blue light, that emerges as a character in its own right. The ship is more interesting thus far, alas, than any of the female characters, but perhaps that will change over time.
  26. The high and witty style of Ian Richardson and the production team headed by Ken Riddington will have you coming back for more, even though there's really much less going on here than meets the eye. [20 Mar 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  27. The Red Road, created by Aaron Guzikowski and produced by Sarah Condon, will likely be a little too downbeat and leisurely for some viewers. But based on the first few episodes, it may be a path worth traveling down.
  28. Like "Knots Landing" and "Falcon Crest," it relies on the familiar romantic tangles and corporate scheming of a TV family business. But unlike anything TV has seen, it infuses an Aaron Spelling-identified genre with a large cast of black characters, a hip-hop soundtrack, lots of street vernacular, and a boldly rhythmic editing style. [14 Apr 2003]
    • Boston Globe
  29. It’s binge-worthy, make no mistake. But still, a few well-placed casual moments among family members would help, so that the story can breathe a bit, and so can we.
  30. A sleekly engaging pilot that, with the right character development, could turn into a sleekly engaging series.

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