Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,308 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Tuesday Night Book Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 663
  2. Negative: 0 out of 663
663 tv reviews
  1. I want to like the show, but it’s going to be difficult.
  2. The procedural, case-a-week format is filled with legal cliches, and Weatherly’s know-it-all character, aptly named Jason Bull, is tiring.
  3. This is the sleeper series of the year. It's a witty knockoff of 'Something Wild' with Tea Leoni a terrific variation of Melanie Griffith's psychotically sexy free spirit luring a straitlaced young man into a life without boundaries. Unfortunately, the young man is Corey Parker, who's about as funny as gefilte fish. [19 Sep 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  4. It all felt safe and predictable, a warm goodnight salvo without any of the tartness or twistedness of Ferguson or of the show’s lead-in host, David Letterman.
  5. Human Target is perfectly adequate action fluff. It’s fast-paced, chock full of fight choreography, and filled with gimmicks including an out-of-control train and an upside-down airplane.
  6. 41 is less an example of close and personal than up-close and fawning.
  7. It won't insult your intelligence, and it has a completely likable lead actor in Kyle Bornheimer; but Worst Week is nevertheless completely predictable and unambitious.
  8. Critics have been trashing this sitcom for weeks, singling it out as the season's first likely casualty. I have to admit I got a modest kick out of the first episode. [6 Oct 2000, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
  9. "Lovespring International" is a lively little cable exercise in over-the-top characters, bad taste, satire, and political incorrectness.
  10. For the most part, the show is content to be another study in the effects of fashion on self-esteem.
  11. Walters makes the movie seem like more than it is. She gives us a fully dimensional woman--an art teacher--who is idealistic, self-righteous, humorless, God-fearing, affectionate toward her students, driven, and not any one of those qualities to a great extreme.
  12. Based on a preview of two episodes, Idiotsitter is fairly amusing.
  13. It's a plot-driven, multi-generational melodrama, which feels particularly shallow at a time when shows such as "Friday Night Lights," "Mad Men," "Dexter," and "Nip/Tuck" are pushing their narrative reach.
  14. A slight but appealing mix of old-school Saturday morning cartoons from the early 1970s along with happy hip-hop tunes.
  15. The J.R. one-liners tend to satisfy, but everything else is boilerplate, which hampers the younger cast.
  16. It's worth keeping an eye on the show, in case it finds somewhere to go that's both intricate and unusual.
  17. Television dramas rarely get therapy right, and State of Mind only adds to that reputation.
  18. The couples are ordinary, and so are their issues. That’s part of the goal of the show--to dissect the mundanity of love and anger. But making a developing story out of these tangles and skirmishes is extremely difficult, and Tell Me You Love Me doesn’t quite pull it off.
  19. As it explores the efficacy of varying business tactics, "The Apprentice" actually has a hint of promise. [8 Jan 2004]
    • Boston Globe
  20. Despite the ambitious effort to show these women as individuals, to explore the ways the men hold them back and the ways they hold themselves back, the show feels generic.
  21. It's just a thoroughly conventional multi-camera sitcom rooted in familiar Felix-Oscar shtick and that tried-and-true comic standby, a cute kid. It's old school...And happy to be that way. [22 Sept 2003, p.B7]
    • Boston Globe
  22. The pop allusions (to Carson Daly, Alfred Hitchcock) and the fog-machine-based production design are flat and unambitious. But “The Vampire Diaries’’ nonetheless satisfactorily opens up yet another TV world of heightened youth, where blood-sucking is a metaphor for a whole range of fears and desires.
  23. The TV equivalent of a murder-mystery novel, the kind you can read in between swims and nods on the beach. You know it’s going to be predictable, illogical, and a little trashy, and you don’t mind if the book jacket gets wet or torn, and if the book got stolen you’d forget about it almost instantly, but still, you kind of want to find out who done it.
  24. The VH1 series is slight, but it has a certain charm and the potential to grow into a harmless, soapy amusement.
  25. If only the endeavor felt more worthy, and less prefabricated at some offshore factory where workers in mouse ears plug in the parts: the underconfident girl with a surprisingly pretty voice, the semi-bad boy with a sensitive side, the meticulously choreographed musical numbers, the heartfelt Disney lessons about self-love and self-expression.
  26. Will is fun, like a supercharged “Shakespeare in Love,” but the regalia, pacing, and dazzling colors often seem like compensations for a somewhat obvious and awkwardly expository script.
  27. The debut isn't disastrous by any means, it just doesn't crackle.
  28. Tim Allen proved at the Emmys just how tired his shtick has become. [16 Sep 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  29. It’s an ambitious work that is always fascinating, if not always successful. When all is said and done, Boardwalk Empire may be TV’s best uneven series.
  30. While it pales next to the original movie, it is an enjoyable Saturday-matinee-styled Western show with a charismatic cast and the potential for savvy plots reflecting the complications of race and violence in the post-Civil War West. [3 Jan 1998]
    • Boston Globe

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