Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,032 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Behind the Candelabra
Lowest review score: 0 The Real Wedding Crashers: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 498
  2. Negative: 0 out of 498
498 tv reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The film, directed by Nelson George, is extraordinary as the basketball player and the man himself.
  1. The episode, written by series creator Matthew Weiner, is a model of efficiency and nuance.
  2. Unlike some of the more uneven odd-couple series that have premiered in recent years, Apartment 23 could turn into a trustworthy address for laughs.
  3. Dunham manages to ties the grimaces and grins together with a comedic sensibility that allows you to see these characters as they are with all their irritating and contradictory behavior, but still root for them as they feel their way into adulthood.
  4. Fans of Sorkin's work, especially his previous shows "Sports Night," "The West Wing," and "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip," will be pleased to see The Newsroom has all the hallmarks of its predecessors.
  5. It's a nicely assembled, topical film that gives us both a sweeping view of gay rights across almost 30 years, as well as an intimate look at an extraordinary person swept up in those times.
  6. Those [dialogue] imperfections never jolted me out of the spell Copper casts.
  7. There are a few revelations in this rich adaptation, concisely written for the screen by Lucinda Coxon.
  8. All of the material crammed into tonight's episode is both intriguing and tensely directed (by Martin Campbell, "Casino Royale"), raising a host of strong possibilities for the show's future.
  9. Despite the blood and the labor, Call the Midwife is filled with heart.
  10. As far as revisiting a tearjerker goes, Steel Magnolias reliably hits the funny bone and will assuredly send you to the tissue box
  11. Nashville falls somewhere in between the two extremes, a story that thrives on heightened melodrama and big twists but gives its characters more depth than you generally find in network lather-fests.
  12. Despite the occasional artificial reality flourish, Catfish: The TV Show is a timely, engaging, and often poignant addition to MTV's lineup.
  13. It's a more visceral impression of a band on fire, and as such it offers plenty of satisfaction.
  14. As a filmmaker, Burns brings to bear a special vividness of scrutiny. No matter how familiar the material, he makes it seem as though he's discovering it afresh--so the viewer feels that way, too.
  15. Fellowes does a good job of keeping all of his players engaged while introducing fresh faces and bringing back old friends.
  16. In the first four new episodes, her characters remain in their self-contained cultural warp, still only just beginning to mingle with hipsters and hard drugs and cold, careering artists, and, yes, black people.
  17. The show has a scruffy, adolescent sweetness with a seeming insensitivity to people with physical disabilities that ultimately feels quite sensitive.
  18. The series is gripping, nicely styled, and smartly written, with a solid leading performance by Matthew Macfadyen as Inspector Edmund Reid, the head of H Division.
  19. By episode 2, though, after the crammed (and super-sized) premiere, [creator] Weisberg reveals a sure sense of detail that bodes well for the future of the series.
  20. It's beautifully filmed in and around Washington, D.C., it's well-acted, and it's cleverly written by Beau Willimon.
  21. Plenty of ground goes unplowed, both personal (there is almost no discussion of wives or family), and business (including the era of exorbitant ticket pricing they helped to usher in), but there’s enough here to give Eagles fans a captivating History lesson.
  22. The only objection to this well-made comedy is overfamiliarity. [10 Mar 1997, p.C10]
    • Boston Globe
  23. What a treat it is to find a medical show that doesn't turn its talented MDs into bedside saints in order to calm viewers' fears about mechanical HMO factories.
  24. After the forced setup, evolves into a rich portrait of hard lives and the possibility of healing. By episode 3, the miniseries feels like a smart crime novel, steeped in very specific locales and individuals.
  25. Angel the WB's new child of "Buffy," is no ordinary spinoff, and it has the potential to become a witty hour of unearthly allegory in its own right. If it can maintain a sense of humor about itself, Angel, which stars David Boreanaz as Buffy's brooding former beau, may become one of those rare spinoffs that isn't merely a flat-out cash-in. [5 Oct 1999, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
  26. Orphan Black has the potential to be memorable entertainment, if they [creators Graeme Manson and John Fawcett] can continue to deliver each and every plot development with a human touch.
  27. It’s honest, credible, trustworthy storytelling.
  28. The Wire is a cop drama from top to bottom. It does take a systemic view of the issue, like "Traffic," Steven Soderbergh's drug-trade saga. But it never sacrifices drama and character for lecture. [31 May 2002, p.E14]
    • Boston Globe
  29. For a new series, Sports Night already has a nicely developed sense of ensemble and texture. Charles and Krause show a natural chemistry as anchors and friends, and Robert Guillaume has strong presence as the imposing executive producer. The most appealing actor, though, is Huffman, who is dynamic as the committed producer who lives only for airtime. She's got caffeine running through her veins. [22 Sept 1998, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe

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