Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,308 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Master of None: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Sons Of Hollywood: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 663
  2. Negative: 0 out of 663
663 tv reviews
  1. What’s different about the second season of Master of None is a greater sense of auteurish confidence--a willingness to allude to movies, to toy with linear storytelling, and to artfully frame shots. ... That kind of playfulness and risk-taking wends in and out of the season with the kind of assurance usually seen in the work of more experienced TV and movie makers.
  2. Based on the first three episodes, I'm thinking season 2 is going to be even better and certainly more consistent.
  3. The first few episodes of this import promise no slack--and plenty of poignancy--as the story line moves closer to the truth of the matter.
  4. By making seemingly real people do bad things, 'Larry Sanders' becomes an adept satire of corporate and human behavior as well as a delicious satire of a specific industry. [19 Sep 1992]
    • Boston Globe
  5. The show beautifully depicts a massive game of musical chairs, a world at war with doom ever present just across the border.
  6. This extraordinary upstairs-downstairs drama, written by Oscar-winning "Gosford Park" screenwriter Julian Fellowes, is a dramatic, intelligent, soapy, comic, and wise piece of work, one that explores social shifts on the eve of World War I while delivering a remarkably engaging cast of characters.
  7. Looks as though the TV drama of the summer, perhaps of the year, has finally arrived. The Night Of is a remarkable piece of work, restoring meaning to overused adjectives such as “gripping” and “powerful.”
  8. It’s melancholy, amusing, clever, insightful, humane, and, with its beautifully shot Atlanta location, steeped in local specificity. There are a few moments in the four episodes sent to critics when the emotional beats are hazy, the ideas vague, the vibe too meditative; but there are many, many more points when the show blows you away with its intelligence, humanity, and unwillingness to rush or telegraph any of its jokes or misfortunes.
  9. While The Corner may sound like just more preachy TV cliches about drug abuse and African-American self-destruction, it is so much more than that. It is about the life and death forces at war in that inner-city staple, The Corner, and it is a jarring introduction to the people behind the statistics and the cliches. I hope it finds an audience, despite its rawness. No one ever said great drama had to be pretty. [14 Apr 2000, p.D1]
    • Boston Globe
  10. Rescue Me isn't for everyone, particularly those who find Leary's fuming a little too convincing. But it's certainly a TV gem, rough but gleaming. [30 May 2006, p.E1]
    • Boston Globe
  11. FX’s 10-part series The People V. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story" is a superior effort, a successful attempt both to vividly re-create the original case and to intelligently reframe it from a more knowing 2016 perspective.
  12. "Be prepared to weep." Those words also apply to the experience of watching these 18 hours. That is no small tribute to Burns and Novick--and a reminder of how much the war remains with us.
  13. The writing strikes a masterful balance between the general issues afflicting America and the individual characters, each so specific and relatable.
  14. When people ask me to recommend good TV, they never seem to have heard about it. Yup, Breaking Bad is that series.
  15. I just may need to put the show at the top of this year’s list, too. It’s as confidently filmed as season 2, with witty musical choices and a falling-air-conditioner-cam, and the plotting promises all kinds of the cosmic surprises that have become a “Fargo” trademark. And then the script is a model of tonal elasticity and a gift bag of twisted and comic pieces of wisdom.
  16. Like the extraordinary Elizabeth Strout novel-in-stories that it’s based on, HBO’s Olive Kitteridge accumulates with steady, earned drama into a searing portrait of quiet desperation. It’s sad, unsentimental, and lovely.
  17. Amazing. [20 June 2005, p.B7]
    • Boston Globe
  18. ''24" is still an addictive amusement park ride of a show.
  19. The episode, written by series creator Matthew Weiner, is a model of efficiency and nuance.
  20. Why watch The Wire if it's such tough-going--so difficult to follow and then, once followed, so pessimistic? Because it offers the kind of earned understanding that leads to progress.
  21. If Rock and co-creator Ali LeRoi can continue to bring depth to the characters without succumbing to cliche or sentiment, they will be on a promising path.
  22. The new layout of the action - Coach Eric Taylor lives in Austin, coaching college football, while Tami Taylor is at home in Dillon on maternity leave - doesn't make the story any less cohesive or satisfying. [5 Oct 2007, p.D2]
    • Boston Globe
  23. The show isn't easy to warm up to, to be honest; it's draped in--and at times stifled by--meticulous period detail and too-perfect lighting, especially in Scorsese's premiere. But in episode two, the characters and the script begin to prevail, and the drama becomes more emotionally distinct and fascinating.
  24. These lives are familiar to us the way that folk tales are, which is to say that no matter how well we already know them they remain vivid and exciting and moving when told well, as they are here.
  25. The show falls somewhere between Woody Allen's film about the '40s, "Radio Days," and TV's version of the '60s, "The Wonder Years," both in time and sensibility. It doesn't have Allen's visual or verbal wit and it doesn't have the polish of "The Wonder Years." But it does have an honesty that "Wonder Years" lost when it ran away from sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll. [20 Sep 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  26. The future of TV comedy is a sick one, my friends. A gloriously, brilliantly, deliriously sick one, where a desperate housewife wears a "SLUT" T-shirt on a prison visit, a businessman sells prefab homes to Saddam Hussein, and a pudgy teen lusts after his first cousin. It's a ferociously Freudian future, replete with a pent-up mama's boy, a family-run banana stand, and a disbarred psychiatrist who wears cutoffs beneath his underwear because he's a "Never-nude." That's a phobia about nakedness he's trying to make into a nationally recognized condition...In short, it's Arrested Development. [7 Nov 2004, p.N4]
    • Boston Globe
  27. Riveting, gripping, and altogether compelling ... An innovative and expertly executed hour of suspense, '24' is without question the best premiere of the fall season. [6 Nov 2001]
    • Boston Globe
  28. In its own affectionate way, Freaks and Geeks puts a pimple into the TV-ized approach to adolescence. This delightfully observed 1980s-set dramedy is high school as many of us remember it, with Twinkie-pounding bullies and Army-jacket wearing druggies and pale nerds with speech impediments and "Star Trek" fixations. It's high school unplugged, a sort of "Dazed and Confused" for the small screen, and it is one of the fall season's most likable new shows. That NBC has thrown "Freaks and Geeks" into the wilds of Saturday night - it premieres tonight at 8 on Ch. 7 - is only further evidence of network nitwitness. [25 Sept 1999, p.C1]
    • Boston Globe
  29. This is cringe comedy at its giddiest best. [2 Jan 2004]
    • Boston Globe
  30. Montage of Heck is dizzyingly impressionistic and dense with information: snippets of recordings Cobain made, interview excerpts, and images that, in some cases literally, animate his life story.

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