Boston Globe's Scores

For 1,295 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Tuesday Night Book Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 655
  2. Negative: 0 out of 655
655 tv reviews
  1. The Middleman is so light as to feel almost weightless, and compared to much TV, that comes as a relief. If comic books are meant to be escape, there are far worse worlds to camp in for the summer.
  2. The action is intense in "Sleeper Cell," and each episode includes at least one stunning moment of violence or betrayal. But character depth isn't sacrificed to keep the pace moving, and there are valuable calms between the storms.
  3. The show is mildly entertaining at best, with a few pluses--unusual story lines, particularly the one set after World War II, some gorgeous scenery, and one or two likable performances--counterbalanced by a few negatives. Least tolerable among the negatives: the occasional Harlequin Romance moments that have you waiting for the lass to shed her corset while the evening wind blows through Fabio’s hair.
  4. Shrek the Halls isn't much more than an extended skit: loud, hectic, unfocused.
  5. While it succeeds nicely on some of these fronts, at times managing to be gripping and thought provoking, it fails to cohere on other fronts, as writer Jack Thorne crams too many characters and too much story into a half-dozen hours.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like Mary Tyler Moore and even the master, Bob Newhart, [Flockhart is] great at reacting to what happens around her. But right now, the characters around her aren't very interesting. [8 Sep 1997]
    • Boston Globe
  6. The problem with the miniseries, written by Peter Harness and directed by Toby Haynes, is its lack of emotional potency, at least in the first two episodes. At moments, the amazingly constructed magical set pieces threaten to overwhelm both the fine points of the plot and the wonderful performances.
  7. What I like about Lone Star, what could make it the strongest TV newcomer of the season, is the ways in which it differs from classic nighttime melodramas. The show is as much a bittersweet character study of con man Bob Allen as it is a new spin on the Ewings.
  8. The gang of five -- star Vince, brother Johnny Drama, dude-in-waiting Turtle, manager Eric, and agent Ari -- has jelled into a dynamic unit.
  9. Collision is a satisfying emotional journey through the twists, turns, and overpasses of a dozen or so lives.
  10. It continues to be to Fellowes’s credit that he manages to write for such a large number and wide array of characters and yet makes viewers know and care about each one. None is purely hissable nor heroic, intentions are murky, and impulsive choices have major consequences, keeping the enjoyable soap at full lather.
  11. The series as a whole has a much better sense of itself, and a more confident tone, since Eli, his colleagues, and the viewers all understand that the guy is in fact a visionary. The coyness of season one is gone. The show, cocreated by Greg Berlanti, nonetheless falls short of being destination television.
  12. Iannucci and his cast are as deft with a wonky policy joke as they are with good old-fashioned bathroom humor and Louis-Dreyfus shines, throwing herself, as she so often did on "Seinfeld" and "The New Adventures of Old Christine," physically into the role.
  13. It’s a sly, low-key comedy, one that makes affectionate fun of Americans and Swedes with equal vigor.
  14. Compared to the original, it's slicker, brighter, more obviously produced, and a smidgen less fun.
  15. It’s such a lovely thing--Cher helping her mother realize her dream after all these years--that I was able to let go of the special’s ulterior motive.
  16. Washington provides a strong sense of the woman and her complex reactions. Pierce, too, is just right here, with his bottled-up anger. Around them are many small but fine portraits--Alison Wright (Martha on “The Americans”) as Thomas’s supportive wife, Bill Irwin as a nasty Danforth, and Treat Williams as Kennedy, hobbled by his own past. Like Confirmation, they’re sharply etched.
  17. The series is gripping, nicely styled, and smartly written, with a solid leading performance by Matthew Macfadyen as Inspector Edmund Reid, the head of H Division.
  18. The movie is so carefully stylized, any and all emotional import has been sucked out of it.
  19. These episodes of Banana are lovely self-standing short stories that build to revelatory moments, but then they also add scope and layers of depth to “Cucumber.”
  20. Like the epic Jenga tower that Phil is constructing, the show is really quite impressive, but it could all fall down just a little too easily.
  21. The world is well-constructed, down to the details: By the third episode this season, Ulrich's hair has grown into a messy and convincing frontier mullet. And the characters are intriguing; Esai Morales is notable as an Allied States Army major who might soon be convinced that his superiors are up to no good.
  22. The show needs some sharpening, but "Murphy Brown" looks like a winner. [14 Nov 1988]
    • Boston Globe
  23. The actors aren’t bad at all, but the script seems to block them from deepening their performances and coloring in the gray along the way.
  24. It's not quite the revelation that "The Simpsons" was, but "Futurama" contains enough inventiveness and heart to make it a worthy follow-up. [26 Mar 1999]
    • Boston Globe
  25. The VH1 series is slight, but it has a certain charm and the potential to grow into a harmless, soapy amusement.
  26. Michael Gambon plays Churchill. The supporting cast is filled with British actors you may have admired before without knowing their names.
  27. It’s gently funny, but also endearing.
  28. 24 makes a feint toward change, before getting back on the same old mechanical cowboy ride.
  29. "Mad About You" isn't devoid of humor, but it's pretty lackluster after "Seinfeld." [16 Sep 1992]
    • Boston Globe

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