Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,403 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Spellbound
Lowest review score: 0 Uncommon Valor
Score distribution:
5,403 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is a revenge thriller that's too taken with its own ambience to actually thrill.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The dialogue is brightly self-conscious, and sometimes it clicks. Just as often it curdles into an entitled whining.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Highly formulaic, make-'em-laugh-then-make-'em-cry comedy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are about 15 minutes of genuine, bust-a-gut comedy in Bringing Down the House, and, surprisingly, they belong to Steve Martin, who hasn't been funny on film in years.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One doesn’t really want to beat up on Girl Most Likely, because it means well and everyone in it appears to be having a good time. But so many things are wrong with the film, from a script that’s bright but never sharp to the editing that leaves scenes hanging flaccidly in the breeze.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Speaking as both a parent and a critic, I do believe I'd rather drive rusty railroad spikes through my eyes than have to sit through one more computer generated family film about talking animals. The bad news for Hollywood is that after seeing Barnyard my kids feel the same way.
  1. This movie doesn’t make the case. In fact, had they upped the absurdity a notch, it would rival the comedy of Christopher Guest’s let’s-put-on-a-show mockumentary, “Waiting for Guffman” (1996). As it stands, it plays like an infomercial.
  2. In fairness, putting holiness onscreen is an enormous challenge. It can be done, as several directors have shown, most notably Dreyer and Bresson. Bad enough that Joffe is the poor man's Lean. He's also the nonbelieving man's Dreyer and Bresson.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Bacon makes an appropriately detestable villain; unfortunately, he's the most interesting character here. As for Love, well, this puts her one career rung closer to ''Hollywood Squares.''
  3. This is an inept and unsubtle romantic fantasy about how black people and white people don't mix.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If anything, Burke & Hare is a slaphappy mess that recalls Landis's earliest work on 1970s midnight movies like "Schlock'' and "The Kentucky Fried Movie.''
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s a somber affair, but if you see it in the right frame of mind, it’s the guilty-pleasure hoot of the season.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    And that dog -- or, rather, that digitally enhanced replicant -- is just plain creepy.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This third go-round for the "Wolf Pack" doesn't bother to Xerox the original 2009 hit comedy, as 2011's witless "Hangover 2" did. Instead, the new movie heads in different, if utterly formulaic, directions. So it's not terrible. It's just bad.
  4. Unofficially, You, Me and Dupree is a companion piece to last summer's "Wedding Crashers," a movie whose lunacy is desperately needed this summer.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is movie goulash: made with love, impossible to digest.
  5. For most of the movie, however, Halle sprints, Halle swims (55 laps!), and Halle screams. It's a two-hour fitness video -- a portrait of the Oscar winner as personal trainer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is low budget but puffed with self-importance, and it offers proof that Hollywood filmmakers should probably steer clear of topics that actually matter.
  6. No doubt a labor of love, the result is just plain laborious for the audience.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Any good will the movie generates, though, is grated right back off by Black, whose obnoxiousness has lost whatever charm it once possessed.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sanctimonious claptrap -- an inert pageant of waxen figures that fails completely as drama even as it insults the sensibilities of anyone not clinging to rosy memories of the slave-era South.
  7. Hop
    Hop may have taken years to design and animate, but it feels as if minutes were required to compose it.
  8. It touches on universal themes of love, friendship, and family. Suffice to say it falls dreadfully short.
  9. It's not that Jenna Fischer is miscast in A Little Help. It's that she's mis-everything else: misused, misdirected, misanthropic.
  10. The movie has elements of road picture, social satire, and odd-couple romance, but mostly it's about lack of pacing and tone. Somewhere very (very) deep in here is a whiff of "Citizen Ruth," and who knows what Alexander Payne might have done with this material. Instead we know what writer-director Robbie Pickering has done with it, and that ain't much.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    ''Health Inspector" hopes to do for Larry what ''Ace Ventura: Pet Detective" did for Jim Carrey, who in this context looks like Noel Coward.
  11. The film's centerpiece is a massacre at a wet T-shirt contest, which the horror director Alexandre Aja has a good time staging (yes, Eli Roth, we see you with the water gun). But it feels like an imitation of B-movie beach schlock and John Waters. The visual humor lacks wit or nerve.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    What a disaster -- a dog.
  12. Might as well have been written by a rushed piece of software. The program calls for a surprise engagement, a street fight complete with crotch punches, an apartment eviction, and a runaway child - all in about five minutes. As an obstacle course, this is mighty efficient. As comic storytelling, it's painful, not too far from being socked in the crotch.
  13. Back to the Future III has no future. The reason is that it never works up much of a past as it sends its gull-winged DeLorean time machine back to the Old West. In effect, it goes back to the Age of Steam and runs out of gas. [25 May 1990, p.45]
    • Boston Globe

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