Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,346 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
5,346 movie reviews
  1. Like no movie before it, Adaptation risks everything -- its cool, its credibility, its very soul -- to expose the horror of making art for the business of entertainment.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Up
    On the most basic level the new film is pure vaudeville: a loopy flyaway fantasy that's hysterically funny if only to keep the darkness at bay.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With at least nine primary characters and running two and a half hours, it's a big, fat novel of a movie - a domestic epic that fuses bitterness and forgiveness in completely satisfying ways.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For a film about a gaggle of slackers, Beautiful Losers is remarkably polished; with its quicksilver editing and fastidious mise-en-scene, it's as tight as the artists are slack.
  2. The result is a masterpiece of investigative nonfiction moviemaking - a scathing, outrageous, depressing, comical, horrifying report on what and who brought on the crisis.
  3. It's a thrill to watch Posey incorporate, at last, some true emotion into her exuberant screwball wit.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Murderball is a paradox: a movie about quadriplegics that insists we look beyond their disability.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's one of the small, pitch-perfect treasures of the movie year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the transporting film experiences of this or any other year.
  4. Bizarre, shadowy, enticingly eerie...more poetic, more tantalizingly original.
  5. Not since the original ''Star Wars'' trilogy has film dipped into myth and emerged with the kind of weight and heft seen in Peter Jackson's first installment of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy.
    • Boston Globe
  6. A marvelous, uncommonly observant, and unexpectedly rousing group portrait.
  7. I was much more disheartened leaving the movie the first time I saw it than I was the second. Its richness resides in its apparent objectivity. Without sacrificing a sense of hope, Cantet suggests that the school system is just like a certain vexing grammatical tense: imperfect but still fighting against irrelevance.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That rose in the desert, a sequel that improves in every way upon its beloved predecessor and a romance that slowly builds a fire from embers thought dead.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie, a simple yet immensely pleasurable tale of a little boy and his undead dog, is good enough on its own. If you know the back story, it's even better.
  8. The immediacy and caprice of violence in The Interrupters are just as strong as in nearly every documentary I've seen about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  9. Farnsworth's embodiment of old American values, with their combination of delicacy, reserve, and stand-alone independence, is a one-of-a-kind treasure.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It is harrowing, heartbreaking, cheering, and unforgettable.
  10. Fast Food Nation has the dramatic flatness and willful lack of personality of some documentaries -- or at least how Linklater thinks a documentary should be. The movie nonetheless feels like both a work of investigative journalism and an immense human-interest story, veering into muckraking, horror, teen comedy, and what passes for "Twilight Zone" science fiction.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ghobadi shows us a world where a village pond can hold both rare goldfish and unforgivable evil, and where every step is onto booby-trapped terrain.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an account of what helplessness does to a man whose philosophy of life has been founded on decisive action.
  11. Moonrise Kingdom is Anderson's seventh movie, and it's the first since "Rushmore" that works from the opening shot to the final image.
  12. Riveting tale of family dynamics packed with as much drama, conflict, and poignancy as the best feature film.
    • Boston Globe
  13. It rates a resounding yes because it doesn't insult our emotional intelligence. [23 Nov 1983]
    • Boston Globe
  14. Intriguing, arresting, delightfully refusing to be pigeonholed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The movie masterfully evokes, through stunning direction and magnificent performances, the heat and passion of desperate people living in desperate times. [18 Feb 1983]
    • Boston Globe
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The best mainstream film since "E.T.," is an uplifting reminder that Hollywood can still produce truly great entertainment...The plot is so exquisitely developed that divulging anything beyond the basic outline might diminish the joyous surprises that await an audience thirsting for originality in a reactionary medium. [03 July 1985, p.57]
    • Boston Globe
  15. This movie catalogs a wealth of human ugliness. It’s even been made to look ugly, presumably to underscore the horror movie that is Precious’s life.
  16. The entire movie is pitched at a scream. But the screaming is more Janis Joplin, Axl Rose, or Mary J. Blige than Jamie Lee Curtis. All the tears I shed were hard-earned. So were all the laughing and clapping and eye-covering. In each case, it was involuntary.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A life is not plot; plot is not life. By scrupulously sticking not just to the accuracies of Turner’s life as we know them but to the tiniest of details, the chipped mugs on kitchen tables, the pantaloons on a passing merchant, the spray of storm surf across the bow of a ship, Leigh wants us to truly see the world Turner moved through. Only by seeing that world can we see how he saw and painted it.

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