Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,862 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Hugo
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
5862 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An eloquent ecological warning.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A heart-rending account of people trying to dodge the hurdles that politics puts in front of them. By the end of this humanist epic, some are ennobled by their struggle. Most are exhausted.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The sight is magical and heartbreaking in equal measure. Look, the movie says: Where so many would fall, a man walks on air.
  1. This is a love letter from one auteur to another that doesn't feel like a term paper. Instead, Far From Heaven is an honest-to-God drama with resonance all its own.
  2. Simple, but loaded. It celebrates the humanity and humanism at the heart of Iran's remarkable flow of films, but it's also more of a rebuke to materialistic values than any ideologue could ever hope to be.
  3. A watchful, winding-down tragedy of a movie that delivers what it promises. As commentary, it's grim. As filmmaking, it's a powerfully disturbing odyssey through the Bucharest health care system.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What's most shocking about The Passenger 30 years later? Seeing Jack Nicholson at the lean, sardonic height of his youthful powers? Finding a Michelangelo Antonioni movie with an actual plot?
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Longer on atmosphere and observation than on story, but you don't mind: Coppola maintains her quietly charged tone with a certainty that would be unbelievable in a second film if you didn't suspect genetics had a hand.
  4. The movie is also more extraordinary than a mere scenic slideshow.
  5. Maurice Bénichou does the most heartbreaking work in the movie, playing a friend of Georges's. It's a character and a performance I'll have a tough time getting out of my dreams.
  6. An invigoratingly mordant comedy that proves that Alexander Payne's rambunctious debut, "Citizen Ruth," was no fluke.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Once is the first rock musical that actually makes sense. People don't burst into song in this movie because the orchestra's swelling out of nowhere. The guy and the girl are working musicians -- or they'd like to be, if they could make a living at it -- and they're played by working musicians.
  7. First and foremost, Good Will Hunting is a film riding young, exuberant energies.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Broadcast News grows in your memory. It recalls an era when movies were made by, for and with three-dimensional characters you cared about. Let's hope it doesn't take James L. Brooks another four years to make another one. We can't wait that long. [25 Dec 1987, p.53]
    • Boston Globe
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a small, compassionate gem of a movie, one that’s rooted in details of people and place but that keeps opening up onto the universal.
  8. Roberts and Erin Brockovich have Oscar contender written all over them.
  9. Mesmerizing and unforgettable.
  10. Takes one man, his children, their spouses and babies, his ex-wife, his girlfriend, her daughter, and his friends and turns it all into a masterpiece about the strange power of food - to heal, unite, exasperate.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A strange and very beautiful documentary about the gray area between obsession and art.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Reflective, haunting, hilarious documentary.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What happens between two people? Only the chemistry that keeps us from stumbling through the chaos by ourselves. Is that an illusion, too? Amour says it doesn't much matter. There is no dignity in life except love.
  11. A civilized delight.
    • Boston Globe
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    More than "Unforgiven," more than "Mystic River," it is Clint Eastwood's autumnal masterpiece.
  12. In short, A Christmas Story isn't just about Christmas; it's about childhood and it recaptures a time and place with love and wonder. It seems an instant classic, a film that will give pleasure to people not only this Christmas, but for many Christmases to come. [19 Nov 1983, p.1]
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At its most unsettling level, Spellbound asks us to consider what words are for and what childhood should be. It's as profound as anything you'll see this year, and, yes, it should have won the Oscar.
  13. Who most of these exquisitely costumed people are I have no idea, but they brush past the camera in such rapids of jubilation it's a wonder they don't knock the thing over. I watched most of the film exhilarated, but depressed that I'm not a big Russophile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The filmmaking team of director James Ivory, screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala and producer Ismail Merchant, remained loyal to James, assembled a brilliant cast and created one of the best films of the year. [10 Aug 1984]
    • Boston Globe
  14. The worst thing about the first Quentin Tarantino picture in five years is that after 93 minutes of some of the most luscious violence and spellbinding storytelling you're likely to see this year, Kill Bill ends.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The strangest thing about Todd Haynes's new movie isn't that he cast six actors to play the various faces and phases of Bob Dylan. It's that he needed only six.
  15. It's all we ask of a film but almost never get, as it first makes us squirm, then makes us cheer.

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