Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Georgia
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
5885 movie reviews
  1. The best film of 2001 was made in 1979.
  2. This is a movie whose power comes from the alignment both of Mija's discovery with ours and of a tremendous writer and director with his star.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If Leviathan takes the Academy Award on the 22nd — and it’s considered the front-runner by some — it’ll be a win for great filmmaking and a loss for the Putin government.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The results bear witness to a time when sacrifice was bleached of everything but itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Elegantly depraved and immaculately degenerate, Park Chan Wook’s The Handmaiden is an astonishment. The filmmaking is masterful, very near to Hitchcock in its sly, controlled teasing of the audience.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You could argue that Gandolfini doesn’t have enough screen time, but what’s there is, as they say, cherce. The scenes in which Albert and Eva get to know each other are delightful miniatures of emotional intimacy, two bruised romantics amazed to find someone still on their wavelength.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A handcrafted jewel of a movie, The Illusionist understands the illusions that sustain us in youth and that we have to let slip in the end. It's the rare work of art that cherishes both the magic and the trick.
  3. Badlands is one of the great banality-of-evil films. [29 May 1998, p.C9]
    • Boston Globe
  4. Offers a surprising and revealing look at Russia's past and present.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Michael Hazanavicius's love letter to classic cinema isn't perfect but it's close enough to make just about anyone who sees it ridiculously happy - and that includes children and grown-ups who have never come across a silent film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    No matter their wealth or social status, these people share disappointments and elations and a sense that life, in the end, may be what life is about.
  5. A masterpiece.
  6. Not only exhilarating and cathartic. It's too funny to be ignored.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The heroine’s voice-overs, delivered into the microphone of a Bell & Howell tape recorder in Minnie’s bedroom, are the movie’s motor. They’re proud and insecure, profanely comic, dripping with adolescent wisdom and self-absorption.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Implicitly acknowledges and celebrates the glorious chicanery and self-delusion of this most American of businesses, and for that reason it may be the most oddly honest Hollywood document of all.
  7. A milestone of eloquent understatement that captures the daily life of have-nots as few American movies have.
  8. By nearly every measure, Milk is a beautifully made, far less conventional movie biography than most.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A subtle, often very funny, ultimately touching tragedy of royal manners and meaning.
  9. With Carrey hitting a career peak, this Grinch doesn't steal Christmas; it restores the season by helping energize us enough to make it through the whole thing.
    • Boston Globe
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Battle of Algiers is a thinking person's action film in which there are winners -- but no heroes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the kind of film that reminds you of what movies, at their best, are capable of.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The impact of this stunning film - and the lessons to be learned from it - are as remarkable as when it was first released 30 years ago.
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The documentary any American with an opinion on our involvement in Iraq owes it to his or her conscience to see.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s about spycraft, but it goes to the source. If for no other reason, it deserves to be seen for arranging decades of events in the Middle East into a chronology that, to an outsider, makes dreadful sense.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When all is said and done, Goodbye to Language may simply be about Jean-Luc Godard exploring 3-D filmmaking, in the same way “The Shining” is really just about Stanley Kubrick wanting to fart around with a Steadicam. Which, honestly, is fine. Great artists use new tools to discover new vehicles for seeing, understanding, living. Be thankful we get to come along for the ride.
  10. It isn't often that lives of quiet desperation are served up with such pearly restraint.
  11. The story is spun forth ravishingly, tenderly, and urgently, with a captivating mix of beauty, spare sophistication, and profound humanity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is something that feels fresh, even revelatory — a work of elegiac bio-doc impressionism. Listen to Me Marlon gets under the skin of the most mysterious performer of the 20th century and forces us to recalibrate all our feelings about him.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Here are great swaths of Baldwin’s prose, read by Samuel L. Jackson in a vocal impersonation that is actually a rather brilliant piece of acting — he convinces you it’s the writer you’re hearing.
  12. It's terse, atmospheric, fatalistic, with vertiginous camera angles and edits offsetting its gray documentary flatness.

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